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The NY Times has recently published an article discussing professional struggles getting into the fields of Law, Business, Medicine, Dentistry, Education, Engineering. The highlight on the education profession features the TPP (Teacher Preparation Program) we participate in at MCE such as DTR and TPP.

Article Education Snippet from : Going Professional: The Ins and Outs: Law, Business, Medicine, Dentistry, Education, Engineering (2014 Aug 1)

EDUCATION | New Standards Coming

Getting in: Fair or not, education schools have a bad reputation. Their admission standards are too low, critics say, their curriculum out of touch. But there is promise of a new era. Recently, the Council for the Accreditation of Educator Preparation introduced new standards that will require entering cohorts to have at least a 3.0 grade-point average and test scores in the top 50 percent nationally by 2016-17. Once students graduate, they are likely to see tougher preparation and licensing requirements as well.

And out: Many education schools have been trying to do more to help students hone the skills they will need on the job. “There’s this idea that teacher prep has not been preparing students for the classroom,” says Ann Nutter Coffman, a senior policy analyst at the National Education Association. “So rather than focusing on theory, there’s a movement to have more clinically based preparation.”

That means future teachers are spending more time in front of students. Innovative teacher-residence programs, such as those offered by the University of Denver and University of Washington, allow participants to teach alongside a mentor in urban public schools while earning a master’s in education — a degree that puts teachers on a higher salary scale and opens up administrative job opportunities down the line.

As for shortages, the nation’s schools have many, especially in math, physics and chemistry. Special-education instructors and middle-school teachers are in high demand. But K-6 teachers are more plentiful, and there’s a surplus of biology teachers. Getting certified in more than one subject can help applicants secure a position, which is why Ms. Coffman says prospective teachers should not put all their eggs in one basket. “Maybe you want to be an elementary schoolteacher,” she says, “but adding special education to that makes it more likely you’ll find a job.”

To view the full article, CLICK HERE.

From: Gregg Kvistad, Provost and Executive Vice Chancellor

It is with great pleasure that I share the news that Dr. Karen Riley has been named dean of the Morgridge College of Education. Chancellor Emeritus Robert Coombe and I launched the search for the permanent dean of the College in late spring. A search committee was formed and very ably led by Dr. Shelly Smith-Acuna, dean of the Graduate School of Professional Psychology. After meeting with the committee last week, the position was offered to Karen, and she enthusiastically accepted.

As many of you know, Karen served as interim dean of the College for the last year. She is an associate professor with tenure, in the area of Child, Family, and School Psychology. From 2011 until 2013, she was the department chair of the Educational Research Policy and Practice program. Between 2010 and 2012, Karen put her leadership skills to work as faculty director of the Fisher Early Learning Center at the University. Karen joined the University as an assistant professor in 2004. She received her master’s degree from DU in 1986 in early childhood special education, and her Ph.D. in 1998 in child and family studies.

Between 1986 and 1997, Karen served as an education practitioner, working as an early childhood specialist and special education preschool coordinator for Adams County School District #12. After completing her Ph.D., Karen shifted gears and embarked on a very productive research career that has won her international acclaim. Working on Fragile X Syndrome, Karen has been funded by the National Institute of Health, the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, the U.S. Department of Education, Novartis Pharmaceutical, the Colorado Department of Education, and other agencies and foundations.

In short, Karen Riley has excellent credentials and an impressive track-record of teaching and research distinction as well as academic leadership. Her candidacy received extraordinarily strong support from her colleagues at the College, other faculty members across the institution, and the many University administrators with whom a dean interacts at the University.

Please join me in warmly welcoming Dr. Karen Riley to the position of dean of the Morgridge College of Education.

Our Ryan Evely Gildersleeve , an associate professor of higher education at Morgridge College of Education at the University of Denver was recently interviewed by Matthew Lynch from Diverse Education. Ryan discusses the current and possible future trends of higher education and why they are so important to higher education professionals.

To view Article, view here: http://diverseeducation.com/article/66148/


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