MCE’s Drs. Doug Clements and Julie Sarama, have been awarded a $3.5 million grant to study learning trajectories in early childhood mathematics instruction. Drs. Clements and Sarama, both Kennedy Endowed Chairs at the Kennedy Institute for Educational Success, have been funded through the U.S. Department of Education’s Institute of Education Sciences for their research. The project, which evaluates the effect of learning trajectories used in early childhood mathematics instruction, looks specifically at whether learning trajectories are better than other approaches in the support of young children’s learning.

Drs. Sarama and Clements will be working with colleagues Art Baroody and David Purpura, conducting research out of the Marsico Institute for Early Learning and Literacy and the Kennedy Institute. By conducting eight experiments in local schools, they will investigate the efficacy of learning trajectories. Their results will impact the ways in which learning trajectories are used across a variety of subject fields, but the implications for mathematics is particularly important. Mathematics is a strong predictor of later school success in mathematics, but also for overall school achievement, graduation, and even college entry.

Career OPPORTUNITIES with RMS

A degree in Research Methods and Statistics from the Morgridge College of Education provides access to a variety of career opportunities. Hands-on learning experiences embedded in the program prepare our graduates to apply their skills in the fields of higher education, government, health, and beyond. Many of our graduates have excelled in their careers and now stand as leaders in their field.

FeatureD Alumni

Research Methods and Statistics Alumni. Where Are they Now_4Assistant Professor – Philip Osteen, Ph.D is currently employed by the Florida State University (FSU) College of Social Work. At FSU Dr. Osteen teaches general linear modeling in the College’s Ph.D program. Dr. Osteen, who has a background in Social Work, focuses his research on crisis intervention, culturally competent practice, LGBTQ, measurement development, mental health, Social Work education, and suicide prevention.

Research Methods and Statistics Alumni. Where Are they Now_1Director, Accountability & Research – Mya L. Martin-Glenn, Ph.D is responsible for District and state level assessments within Aurora Public Schools. She supervises educational research meets by meeting with district and building administrators on assessment issues, designing and conducting evaluations, developing assessment reports, and sharing assessment results.

Research Methods and Statistics Alumni. Where Are they Now_3Research Manager – Veronica A. Gardner, Ph.D works at D3, an international research firm where she leads, trains, and mentors a team of research analysts that manage public opinion surveys, monitor and evaluate projects, and monitor media research in various countries. Dr. Gardner oversees projects throughout the full research cycle, from contracting to research design.

Research Methods and Statistics Alumni. Where Are they Now_5Clinical Assistant Professor – Jini Puma, Ph.D teaches Research and Evaluation Methods courses at the University of Colorado Denver, Colorado School of Public Health. Dr. Puma also writes grants to fund her Culture of Wellness in Preschools (COWP) public health intervention program, oversees the implementation of the COWP intervention, advises students, and writes manuscripts.

Research Methods and Statistics Alumni. Where Are they Now_4 ( Michelle Vanchu_Orosco)Post-Doctoral Research Associate – Michelle Vanchu-Orosco, Ph.D, coordinates and runs activities necessary for the successful completion of the SSHRC-funded Partnership Grant. The project, entitled Digitizing the Wisdom of Our Elders: From Digital Storytelling to Life Learning Project, received the 1st Place Exhibits Session Award at Postdoctoral Research Day.

Research Methods and Statistics Alumni. Where Are they Now_2 (Morgan earp)Research Statistician – Morgan S. Earp, Ph.D works as a government employee for the Bureau of Labor Statistics Office of Survey Methods Research where she assesses non-response bias and measurement error. She also teaches courses in statistical analysis and quantitative research methods at George Washington University. Dr. Earp is an active member of the American Association for Public Opinion Research.

On May 13, 2015, the Morgridge College of Education (MCE) Early Childhood Special Education (ECED) Certificate program received an endorsement as an Approved Educator Preparation Program by the Colorado Department of Education (CDE).

MCE’s ECED Certificate is a 24-credit hour program that aligns with the Masters of Arts in Early Childhood Special Education. The endorsement includes an additional set of courses, knowledge, and skills that will be attached to the CDE Teacher’s License. Candidates of the ECED Certificate program are required to complete 600 hours of practicum over three age-levels (infant-toddler, preschool, and school-age), pass the ECSE Place test or Praxis II, and apply to the state for the Early Childhood Special Education Specialist Endorsement. Additionally, candidates who wish to complete the ECED Certificate program must already hold a Colorado Teacher’s License.

Doctors Julie Sarama and Doug Clements’ pre-K math curriculum, Building Blocks, is being implemented throughout New York City, following successful results seen in Boston, Buffalo, and Nashville. This roll out is part of the New York City Department of Education initiative, “NYC Pre-K Explore,” which also promotes improved literacy and science programs. Deputy Chancellor, Josh Wallack, expects the Building Blocks curriculum will be used by 13,500 children in 750 district and community-based classrooms by fall 2015, and by the vast majority of New York City children within the next three years.

Early math skills are seen as a strong predictor of success in school and later in life; however, preschools across the country tend to ignore anything beyond basic counting games. Dr. Clements says that many preschool teachers aren’t comfortable with numbers because they went through the U.S. education system, which “is just not very good about teaching math and making it fascinating.”

With the implementation of the Building Blocks curriculum, preschool teachers will have the opportunity to use puzzles, games, art projects, and songs to help children learn more about numbers, shapes, and patterns. Those who volunteer to adopt Building Blocks will receive the books, related games, seven days of training, and coaching for one year to help facilitate successful outcomes.

If you have a Wall Street Journal account, you can read more about the New York City Building Blocks implementation here.

 

Morgridge Curriculum and Instruction professors and Kennedy Institute staff, Dr. Julie Sarama and Dr. Doug Clements, are a part of a team working to advance math and science skills in early childhood learning. With support from the National Science Foundation (NSF), Dr. Sarama and Dr. Clements have developed the Connect4Learning (C4L) curriculum. Through C4L, preschool students are getting the opportunity to spend more time engaging in fun activities that promote science and math. C4L aims to educate pre-K students with a holistic approach that integrates academics, social and emotional development, and play in the classroom.  A key element to their research is video analysis of the program in action; this allows for program growth and provides ways to create better support for diverse student bodies.

Dr. Sarama and Dr. Clement’s work on C4L has been showcased in a new Science Nation video created by NSF. The video features their work at the All Souls School in Englewood, CO, which has adopted the C4L project. Through the use of sea creatures, pre-K students at All Souls School are learning their numbers and shapes. The highly engaging activities not only promote science and math-based learning, but are also fun for the students.

The C4L author team includes experts in all four domains. Nell K. Duke is a professor of literacy, language, and culture and a faculty affiliate in the combined program in education and psychology at the University of Michigan. She studies early literacy development, particularly among children living in poverty. Kimberly Brenneman is Program Officer for Education at the Heising-Simons Foundation. Prior to joining the Foundation, Kimberly was research faculty at Rutgers University’s National Institute for Early Education Research where she led projects focused on curricular and instructional practices to foster science, technology, engineering, and mathematics learning for young children in school and home settings. Mary Louise Hemmeter is a professor in the Department of Special Education at Peabody College of Vanderbilt University and is a co-faculty director of the Susan Gray School for Children. She studies professional development, strategies for preventing and addressing challenging behavior, and instructional approaches for young children with disabilities.

iwishmyteacherknew

#iwishmyteacherknew

#iwishmyteacherknew (I Wish My Teacher Knew) has become a nationally trending hashtag on twitter and other social media platforms. Kyle Schwartz (@kylemschwartz), a graduate of the Morgridge College of Education’s Denver Teacher Residency program, and third grade teacher, started the Twitter sensation. What began as a simple assignment where students were asked to finish the sentence “I wish my teacher knew…” has garnered the attention of both educators and the national media.

Schwartz’s students at Doull Elementary in Denver wrote such insightful and heartbreaking responses to her question that she began sharing some of them on Twitter. Since the initial posts the hashtag has gone viral and enormous support has been pouring into Denver area schools. The phenomenon has been featured on ABC NewsThe Today ShowThe Washington Post, and many other major media outlets.

There are a number of ways you can help support Denver area schools. Please check out Schwartz’s DonorsChoose.org page, below. You can also visit Denver area Goodwill locations and drop off books for 7News’ Books for Kids initiative.

The Morgridge College of Education (MCE) Alumni Board and College of Education Student Association (COESA) hosted the Spring Signature Event on Tuesday, May 5th. The event, which focused on the release of Carrie Morgridge’s new book Every Gift Matters, included a book signing, interview, and student Q&A session.

Carrie Morgridge, Vice President of the Morgridge Family Foundation, sat down with DU Chancellor Rebecca Chopp to discuss the purpose of the book. In Every Gift Matters, Carrie shares stories about the act of giving as a vehicle for positive change. A well-known philanthropist, student advocate, and creator of innovative professional development for teachers, Carrie is a firm believer that “teachers deserve to be treated as professionals.” Her book explains the importance of the phrase “every gift matters” and that teachers can be empowered through small and large donations alike.

The evening included a chance for MCE students to have an intimate discussion with Carrie and Bob Sheets, MCE Alumni board member. During this unique opportunity, students learned about foundation giving and fundraising as they reflected on their own community participation.

The evening concluded with Carrie empowering participants to give back. The Morgridge Family Foundation handed out gift cards to DonorsChoose.org; a site where the donor gets to identify a project that speaks to them and donate to it.

On Friday, May 1st, the Queer & Straight Student Alliance (QSSA) held an official Coming Out celebration at Morgridge, with lots of student support, food, and games.

QSSA is a new student organization established by students for students. The organization has a primary audience of students who identify as Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Intersex, Queer/Questioning, and/or Ally (LGBTIQA), but also welcomes all students from the Morgridge College of Education and other DU graduate programs. The student group was initially formed during the 2013-2014 academic year, when then-students Jenna Brownfield, Counseling Psychology graduate, and Nick Ota-Wang, Higher Education graduate, and current Higher Education student Sarah Blizzard, identified the need for a student group within the Morgridge College of Education.

The purpose of QSSA is to help create a space for LGBTIQA identified students to meet and connect within the college and have an avenue for dialogue. If you’re interested in attending a QSSA meeting, they will continue to be held every two weeks during the remainder of the Spring Quarter. To learn more about QSSA visit their Facebook page and join the QSSA Facebook group. If you’d like to be in the know about the happenings of QSSA and other LGBITQA student organizations at DU, subscribe to their listserv. QSSA can also be reached via email at mceqssa@gmail.com.

QSSA will soon be recruiting for leadership positions for the 2015-2016 academic year. If you would like to learn more send QSSA an email.


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