Now Recruiting Research Participants

Are you or your son/daughter between the ages of 6 and 25 years old? Do you like playing computer games? Your participation in this study could help us learn more about thinking and reasoning in individuals with intellectual disability.

The purpose of this research is to evaluate specialized tests for tracking cognitive changes.

wHO cAN pARICIPATE?1-29-16 MCE Research Measuring Cognitive Development in Individuals with Intellectual Disabilities Photo 2

  • Individuals with a confirmed diagnosis of intellectual disability caused by Down syndrome, fragile X syndrome, or another cause.
  • Males and females, between 6 – 25 years old
wHAT dOES THE sTUDY iNVOLVE

  • Cognitive and behavioral evaluations during 2-­‐3 visits. These visits typically last about 4-­‐4.5 hours scheduled over a two-day period.
wHAT wILL i RECEIVE?

  • The study will provide $30 compensation for your time and effort for the 1st study visit, $20 for the 2nd study visit, and $50 for the 3rd study visit.
  • One of our research psychologists will provide feedback on cognitive assessment results.
  • We can offer reimbursement for lodging and travel to the University of Denver from your home
aDDITIONAL iNFORMATION

The University of Denver is a private university dedicated to the public good.

All studies take place at the Morgridge College of Education which is located at 1999 E. Evans Ave. Denver, CO 80210.

Sign Up for rESEARCH

To learn more about participating in research, call Jeanine Coleman at 303-­‐871-­‐2496 or email
Jeanine.coleman@du.edu.

The Morgridge College of Education at the University of Denver hosted a screening of the Rocky Mountain PBS (RMPBS) film, Standing in the Gap, on Thursday, January 21. Over 250 attendees joined a welcome reception at Katherine Ruffatto Hall followed by a viewing of the documentary at Davis Auditorium.

The event featured a panel discussion moderated by Maria del Carmen Salazar, PhD, Associate Professor, Curriculum Studies & Teaching, Morgridge College of Education.

Panelists included:

  • Antonio Esquibel, Executive Director of West Denver Network Schools, Denver Public Schools
  • Burt Hubbard, Reporter, Rocky Mountain PBS News
  • Karen Riley, PhD, Dean, Morgridge College of Education
  • Julie Speer, Senior Executive Producer, RMPBS

Standing in the Gap explores the impact of federally mandated busing for Denver Public Schools, as well as the re-segregation that occurred when busing ended in the 1990s. During the film, students, parents, faculty, and administrators describe the challenges they face with segregation and the achievement gaps that continue to exist between white students and students of color.

The panelists stressed the importance of funding for schools, early childhood education, evidence-based best practices, and community and family involvement. The panel discussion was lively with a clear sense that there is not one magic bullet, but that there are strategies that schools, districts, and institutions of higher education are – and can — employ immediately.

The screening was included as part of the University of Denver’s annual Diversity Summit on Inclusive Excellence which is hosted by the Center for Multicultural Excellence. The theme of this year’s summit is “Beyond Good Intentions: Confronting My Bias to Change Our Community”. The documentary is part of RMPBS’s Race in Colorado initiative, produced with the goal to create a new vision for living in diverse communities and to demonstrate how systemic change will benefit communities.

Students in the Morgridge College of Education’s Library & Information Science program have been involved in a collaborative project with students from École Nationale Supérieure des Sciences de l’Information et des Bibliothèques (ENSSIB) in Lyon. LIS faculty member Krystyna Matusiak and ENSSIB’s Raphaëlle Bats – two members of the International Federation of Library Associations (IFLA) Library Theory and Research (LTR) Committee – created an international communication team to support IFLA in 2011, and the MCE students joined in 2014. The collaborative work supports communication activities of IFLA LTR as well as monitoring and distributing information, and includes translating the LTR newsletter for global audiences. The projects allow LIS students to learn more about, and participate in, international librarianship.

View the article here (page 7).

The International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions (IFLA) is the leading international body representing the interests of library and information services and their users. It is the global voice of the library and information profession. Founded in Edinburgh, Scotland, in 1927 at an international conference, they celebrated their 75th birthday at their conference in Glasgow, Scotland in 2002. They now have over 1500 Members in approximately 150 countries around the world. IFLA was registered in the Netherlands in 1971. The Royal Library, the national library of the Netherlands, in The Hague, generously provides the facilities for their headquarters.

Assistant Professor Trisha Raque-Bogdan, Ph.D. has been awarded the inaugural Bruce and Jane Walsh Grant to study the effect that one’s work – and the meaning ascribed to that work – has on cancer survivors. Dr. Raque-Bogdan noticed a gap in research on the topic during her graduate studies, and began to work with cancer support organizations to learn more. The grant-funded study will be conducted in collaboration with Ryan Duffy, Ph.D. of the University of Florida’s Department of Psychology.

Drs. Raque-Bogdan and Duffy will fund a longitudinal study involving over 650 participants that collects and analyzes information on the level of meaning that cancer survivors placed on their work and how it affects their sense of purpose and mental, emotional, and physical health. They recruited study participants from the Rocky Mountain Cancer Center, the Young Survivors’ Coalition, and the CO Breast Cancer Coalition. Once awareness of the study spread, it “took on a life of its own” according to Dr. Raque-Bogdan, and filled up very quickly with cancer survivors who felt invested in helping others to understand the role of work in finding purpose. Dr. Raque-Bogdan said that “no research to date has examined how experiencing meaning at work relates to physical health…to both mental and physical health over time, or the personal and environmental conditions that impact the relation between the experience of meaningful work and health.”

In the United States, the lifetime risk of developing cancer is – according to the American Cancer Society – slightly less than one in two for men and slightly more than one in three for women. With the prevalence of cancer in society and the understanding that many cancer survivors are employed full time, it is increasingly important to understand how work, an integral part of many lives and identities, contributes to finding meaning and supports the well-being of cancer survivors. At this time, the researchers have finished collecting one set of data from the participants, and will collect additional data in six months and one year in order to form a comprehensive picture. Dr. Raque-Bogdan is a first-year Assistant Professor at Morgridge and she looks forward to pursuing this unique research opportunity to develop her career and establish partnerships with the cancer community.

Nicolle Ingui Davies has been named the 2016 Library Journal Librarian of the Year, marking the first time a Colorado librarian has been recognized for the honor. Davies became the Executive Director for Arapahoe Library District in 2012. A District which runs eight libraries and recently received a budgetary increase of $6 million, bringing the total annual budget to $30 million. She began teaching at MCE for the Library and Information Science Program in 2015; Davies taught the Public Libraries course and is scheduled to do so again in the near future.

After becoming ALD’s Executive Director, Davies worked with the library board and staff to create a strategic plan and rebrand the library’s operations by establishing four pillars – deliver very important patron experiences, surprise and delight, make every experience matter, and strive for simplicity – to move ALD from “nice to essential” as a community resource and to ensure memorable experiences for every patron.

In addition to prioritizing high-quality patron interactions, Davies’ transformation of Arapahoe Libraries into essential community centers has included access to technology. Under her leadership, ALD is a local leader by taking on the costs, risks, and rewards of adopting and providing access to products in early development – sharing technology that is in its beta phase has proven to be extremely popular with patrons. Notable products ALD has procured include Google Glass, Go Pro camera, and 3-D printers.

MCE extends its congratulations to Nicolle and the Arapahoe Library District in obtaining national recognition for providing exemplary community leadership and resources. Read the full article here.

About Library Journal
Founded in 1876, Library Journal (LJ) is one of the oldest and most respected publications covering the library field. Over 75,000 library directors, administrators, and staff in public, academic, and special libraries read LJ. Library Journal reviews over 8000 books, audiobooks, videos, databases, and web sites annually, and provides coverage of technology, management, policy, and other professional concerns. For more information, visit
www.libraryjournal.com. Library Journal is a publication of Media Source Inc., which also owns School Library Journal, The Horn Book publications, and Junior Library Guild.

About Arapahoe Libraries
Arapahoe Libraries serve 250,000 patrons and include eight community libraries, a jail library and a Library on Wheels in Arapahoe County, Colorado. For more information, visit arapahoelibraries.org.


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