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Campus Conversations is a monthly, student-led group that discusses issues of identity, oppression, and privilege. The group was founded by Grace-Ellen Mahoney, a first-year graduate student at the Morgridge College of Education (MCE). Mahoney’s efforts are supported by MCE Faculty members Andi Pusavat, Ph.D, a Clinical Assistant Professor, and Patton Garriot, Ph.D, an Assistant Professor, of the Counseling Psychology (CP) Department.

The first meeting took place on April 7, with a great turn out by faculty and students from a variety of different programs across campus. The meeting focused on what goals Campus Conversations should pursue, as well as setting group norms for future meetings.

Mahoney is a first year CP graduate student at MCE. She graduated from the University of Oregon in 2014 with a degree in Family and Human Services. Her academic and professional interests include providing culturally responsive mental health services to marginalized and under-served populations. Mahoney began Campus Conversations because she believes that an important aspect of graduate school is learning from others and having one’s beliefs challenged. This belief fueled an interest in providing students with a space to openly discuss issues of identity and social justice outside of the classroom.

Andi Pusavat, Ph.D., is a Clinical Assistant Professor and Counseling Services Clinic Director in the Counseling Psychology Department at the University of Denver. Dr. Pusavat’s clinical interests are in the intersections of identities and her research interests focus on emotional abuse. She is very excited to be a faculty sponsor of Campus Conversations and she is a current member of the Counseling Psychology Diversity Task Force and Morgridge College of Education Inclusive Excellence Committee at the University of Denver. Dr. Pusavat feels very fortunate to have participated in the first Campus Conversations meeting and looks forward to supporting the program as it continues to address issues of identity, oppression, and privilege. She espouses that transformational conversations about diversity and privilege require honest, respectful dialogue that both empowers and challenges participants to think and feel within the context of brave spaces. “It is never too late to give up our prejudices.” ~Henry David Thoreau

Dr. Garriott’s work focuses on the intersections of race, class, and vocational psychology with an emphasis on issues of access and equity. He is a member of the Counseling Psychology Diversity Task Force and proud faculty sponsor of the Campus Conversations program at DU. Dr. Garriott believes that Campus Conversations offers students, staff, and faculty the opportunity engage with one another on issues of privilege, oppression, and equity. He believes open dialogues on issues of diversity help us check our own biases and communicate at a broader level that the university community is invested in creating an environment that is truly inclusive.

The next Campus Conversations meeting will take place on May 12, from 4:00pm – 5:00pm in Katherine Ruffatto Hall Room 105. Campus Conversations is open to all DU students, faculty, and staff.

Interested in getting involved? Email Mahoney at Grace.Mahoney@du.edu.

“It is surprising how deep and broad children’s thinking can be about mathematics” said Douglas Clements, Ph.D, to a packed White House Press room this morning, April 21, 2016. Dr. Clements, who is a faculty member at the Morgridge College of Education (MCE), the Kennedy Endowed chair in Early Childhood Learning, and the Co-Director of the Marsico Institute for Early Learning and Literacy alongside his Colleague Julie Sarama, Ph.D, is a nationally renowned expert in early childhood math education. He was invited to the White House to participate in the panel discussion “What does the research say about Early STEM” a part of the Early Learning STEM Symposium which was hosted by the White House, U.S. department of Education, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, and Invest in US.

The Early Learning STEM Symposium highlights the important role science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) have in preparing our nation’s youngest children for the future. The Marsico and Kennedy Institutes at the Morgridge College of Education are making a significant impact in the field of early childhood math. “We know so much already about how children learn math. Our work on learning trajectories needs to continue and be more widely disseminated,” Dr. Clements told the crowded audience of early childhood STEM experts.

For the full video visit the White House Briefing Room.

As part of MCE’s ongoing initiative to make a positive impact on the Denver community, the Marsico Institute for Early Learning and Literacy is proud to announce their significant contribution to the Jeffco Prosperity Project (JPP), a major collaboration between local educational, business, non-profit and government agencies aimed at tackling poverty in the greater Denver area.

Under a three-year contract, Marsico’s Assistant Director of Research Dr. Carrie Germeroth and Research Project Director Dr. Crystal Day-Hess will be evaluating the project and providing strategic feedback in an effort to maximize the JPP’s positive impact on the local community.

Drs. Germeroth and Day-Hess will be collecting data from a variety of sources including JPP participants, coaches, and administrators, as well as surveying key JPP partners to assess the project’s effectiveness. Based on their evaluations, they will be providing recommendations to JPP administrators on any programmatic changes that should be made to improve family services and support systems.

Jeffco Prosperity Project Model

Jeffco Prosperity Project Model

Initiated in 2010, “The Jeffco Prosperity Project will change the way human services and education services are provided to low-income families in Jefferson County.” The project aims to reduce generational poverty by providing vital support services for families, including those that focus on school readiness, family self-sufficiency, and health/mental health well-being.

The Marsico Institute was given $156,976 in funding for the three-year contract, part of a $1.6 million dollar award from the Daniels Fund to The Action Center, the JPPs primary funder. Other key partners include the Jeffco Schools Foundation, which is supporting the project’s implementation, as well as the Jefferson County Department of Human Services, Jeffco Public Schools, and Arvada Head Start.

Since its conception in 2010, the JPP has gone through vital early planning stages and launched what is now an innovative, implementation-ready program that aims to see tangible improvements by the end of the 2017-2018 school year. According to one JPP parent, “This program is a gift for a lifetime. My kids will have more opportunities for a better future than I had.”

Be sure to stay tuned for more updates from the Morgridge College of Education and the Marsico Institute on their involvement in this important collaboration.

Aesthetic learning and arts curricula are a key component in the development of young minds. The Morgridge College of Education (MCE) and its faculty, students, and alumni are making an impact across the nation in the world of arts education.

Bruce Uhrmacher, Ph.D

Bruce Uhrmacher, Ph.D

P. Bruce Uhrmacher, Ph.D and MCE faculty member, leads teachers in incorporating the arts in their daily lives and work. Dr. Uhrmacher is a proponent for aesthetic learning experiences and advocates that all educators can enhance their teaching by bringing creativity in to the classroom. Dr. Uhrmacher has been working with Think 360 Arts since 1993 to promote the creative arts in Colorado.

MCE and Think 360 Arts recently co-sponsored a training program where teachers engaged in art-making projects designed to teach them creative problem solving and inspire them to use similar practices in the classroom. In a Rocky Mountain Public Broadcasting (RMPBS) feature documenting the event, Program Director Caitlin Lindquist states that the organization brings in “artists that are really adept at working with a wide variety of student populations and skilled in developing curriculum.” The artists inspire teachers to bring art to life in their teaching and classrooms.

MCE Alumni Make an Impact in Art Education

MCE alumni are also making an impact in education as they utilize skills learned at MCE to implement the arts and aesthetics in their own work.

Curriculum and Instruction (CI) alumna Michelle Mandico is a practicing artist who incorporates her love of art into her teaching. Her art includes influences from her work in early childhood education, higher education, and residential education.

David Kennedy is a CI alumnus who taught middle and high school prior to enrolling at MCE. He recently developed a series of videos as a student addressing the use of arts—in particular, music—as a way for minority students to engage with curricula

MCE Faculty, students, and alumni create and participate in projects that support creativity in effective learning. Our programs aim to empower graduates to make a lasting impact in their communities.

RMPBS Feature on Think 360 Art

The Morgridge College of Education (MCE) is proud to recognize the faculty and students participating at the 2016 AERA Annual Meeting: “Public Scholarship to Educate Diverse Democracies.” If you would like to find out more about the sessions being presented by MCE faculty, students and alumni then review the list below.

The Roles of Transfer and Forgetting in the Persistence and Fadeout of Early Childhood Mathematics Interventions 
Douglas H. Clements, PhD; Julie Sarama, PhD
Sat, April 9: 10:35am-12:05pm, Convention Center, Level Two, Exhibit Hall D

Drs. Clements and Sarama will present their research on how the fadeout effect can be explained by a treatment-control difference during the forgetting of mathematics knowledge. They will present their findings on the fadeout of academic intervention impacts using the OLS probability regression analysis. Results indicate that while it is not the primary contributor of the fadeout, it is a significant contributor. It was found that the magnitude of this treatment-control difference in forgetting accounts for about 28% of the size of the fadeout effect of an early mathematics intervention.

Evaluating a Revised Developmental Progression for Volume Measurement—Kindergarten Through Grade 2
Douglas W. Van Dine, PhD
Sat, April 9: 10:35am-12:05pm, Convention Center, Level Two, Exhibit Hall D

Dr. Van Dine will present his research, which used Rasch modeling, on developmental progressions for filling, packing, building, and comparing volume measurement for Kindergarten through Grade 2. Van Dine will also present results, which indicate support that the developmental progressions are valid.

Academics in the Earliest Years of Formal Schooling: Building Evidence for Policy and Practice
Douglas H. Clements, PhD; Julie Sarama, PhD
Sat, April 9: 2:15-3:45pm, Convention Center, Level One, Room 146 A

This session explores a range of policy questions related to preschool and kindergarten. Faculty will present papers which explore questions related to academic and non-academic time in the earliest years of school as well as the effects of policy changes and interventions on a range of important student outcomes.

Technology & Transformation: Two Professors’ Experience Teaching Online for the First Time
Norma Hafenstein, PhD; Nicole Joseph, PhD
Saturday, April 9: 4:05-5:35pm, Convention Center Level Two, Exhibit Hall B

Drs. Hafenstein and Joseph will report the findings of a faculty self-study research they conducted to document and analyze their first-time experiences teaching in a virtual environment, including prior expectations, professional development, and the transferability of face-to-face pedagogical techniques and strategies.

Elliot Eisner SIG Business Meeting
P. Bruce Uhrmacher, PhD (Meeting Chair)
Saturday, April 9: 6:15-7:45pm, Convention Center Room 159A

In this meeting—chaired by Dr. Uhrmacher—Dr. Joel Westheimer will discuss the relationships between the work of Elliot Eisner and the 2016 Annual Meeting theme, “Public Scholarship to Educate Diverse Democracies.” Attendees will have input into the direction of the SIG as we discuss a variety of business matters.

Eisner in Mind: Fresh Perspectives on Inquiry and Education
P. Bruce Uhrmacher, PhD (Session Chair)
Sunday, April 10: 10:35am-12:05pm, Convention Center Room 153

Assessing and Increasing Novice Teachers’ Efficacy in Working with Families
Kirsten Hermanutz; Gloria Miller, PhD
Monday, April 11: 7:45-9:15am, Convention Center Room 141

Hermanutz and Dr. Miller will share their recently completed study to examine novice teachers’ self-reported efficacy, a factor affecting the attrition rate of novice teachers. Results are tied to specific field experiences enhancing novice educators’ efficacy about working with families and lessen the likelihood of leaving the field.

Discovery-Based STEM Learning 2.0: Are We There Yet?
Douglas H. Clements, PhD (Presentation Chair)
Monday, April 11: 7:45-9:45am, Marriott Marquis Level Two Salon 12

Approaching the centennial of Dewey’s ‘Democracy and Learning,’ presenters will appraise whether the field has realized John Dewey’s vision of meaningfully situated learning by establishing their contribution in a design study of STEM cognition and instruction.

A Rasch Analysis of the Current Opioid Misuse Measure for Chronic Pain Patients
Lilian Chimuma; Kathy E. Green, PhD; Courtney Morris
Monday, April 11: 11:45am-1:15pm, Marriott Marquis Level Two Salon Four

Chimuma, Dr. Green, and Morris will present results of using the Current Opioid Misuse Measure—used by clinicians—to monitor patients on long-term opioid therapy, using the Rasch model for dimensionality and scale use. They will discuss the results in detail, including suggestions for measure revision and future research.

Many-Faceted Rasch Measurement: Assessing Rater Errors in Performance Assessment
Priyalatha Govindasamy; Kathy Green, PhD; Jessica Lerner, EdS; Maria del Carmen Salazar, PhD
Monday, April 11: 2:45-4:15pm, Marriott Marquis Level Two Salon Four

The presentation of this paper will address the teacher supervisors (raters) potential errors through Many Faceted Rasch Measurement (MFRM), a complex process in which raters tend to introduce errors that are not attributed to the actual ratees’ performance.

The Design & Implementation of an Evaluation Model for Equitable & Effective Teaching
Priyalatha Govindasamy; Kathy Green, PhD; Jessica Lerner, EdS; Maria del Carmen Salazar, PhD
Tuesday, April 12: 12:25-1:55pm, Convention Center Level Three Ballroom B

Govindasamy, Dr. Green, Lerner, and Dr. Salazar will describe the development, implementation, analysis, and results of a research study to design a preservice teacher evaluation tool known as the Framework for Equitable and Effective Teaching (FEET), and will assess rater bias, analyze measures of reliability and validity, and identify implications for revising the evaluation model and training for supervisors.


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