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The Marsico Institute for Early Learning and Literacy in the University of Denver’s Morgridge College of Education was recently awarded the Central Regional Educational Laboratory (REL) along with four other partners, led by Marzano Research Laboratory. The award for $181,000 spans the next year with opportunities for additional funding over the next five years.

The REL program is sponsored by the U.S. Department of Education’s Institute of Education Sciences and serves the United States through ten designated regions. Each REL supports state and local agencies in its region and provides technical assistance, research assistance, and resources to introduce best and proven practices into the nation’s schools. Specifically, REL Central supports these efforts in Colorado, Kansas, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, South Dakota, and Wyoming.

Marsico’s focus for this year will be on early childhood education in rural areas. Although Marsico resides in an urban setting at the Morgridge College of Education, the Institute and College are committed to educational equality across the age span and across the region. This includes a focus on the children and families that reside in the region’s rural communities. Across all levels of the College, researchers are pioneering innovative solutions to ensure that rural school districts have access to the best practices and resources in the field. Additionally, faculty are collaborating with rural school districts to improve student outcomes in areas ranging from early learning, to physical activity, to college access.

Led by Dr. Douglas Clements and Dr. Julie Sarama, who are national experts in the field of early childhood education, Marsico identifies the best in early learning research, practice and policy and delivers this information to academics, practitioners, policymakers, and parents.

“We connect with the people who can create and implement changes to improve the lives of young children,” said Sarama.

Dr. Carrie Germeroth, assistant director of research at Marsico, has previously worked with several states involved with REL Central and said, “Being awarded the Central REL will allow us to further our reach with communities who may otherwise not have access to these resources. Everyone at Marsico is thrilled to work with Marzano Research Laboratory to enact change and bring education to everyone.”

Morgridge College of Education Dean Karen Riley, is delighted to see the Institute continue to grow and believes being awarded REL Central highlights the great work being done by the entire College regarding education expansion to rural areas.

“We have several programs within Morgridge that allow us to work with educators in rural districts,” said Riley. “From our top-ranked educational leadership program to teacher preparation and piloting new approaches to distance learning, we are committed to working with rural partners across the region. For the University, being awarded the Central REL shows our dedication to the community beyond its campus borders and allows us to live up to our pledge to be a great, private University dedicated to the public good.”

Substance abuse and addiction is an issue that affects nearly 12% of the US population directly, with over 21 million adults battling substance use disorders each year according to American Addiction Centers. That figure doesn’t account for family members and friends of addicts that are indirectly affected. Counseling Psychology Master’s student, and NAADAC fellow, Elizabeth Kidd, put it well: “When you are counseling someone with an addiction, you are also touching the lives of their friends, family members, and community. Addiction harms not only the person who is struggling, but also the people who surround them.”

Heroin use is at an all-time high, with rates of use tripling from 2002 to 2014. According to a CBS News report, current rates of overdose deaths are at 5 times what they were in 2000. The Surgeon General recently released its first ever report on alcohol, drugs, and health, titled “Facing Addiction in America.” Amongst the report’s key findings are figures representing the financial impact of addiction and substance abuse: It is estimated that the yearly economic impact of substance misuse is $249 billion for alcohol misuse and $193 billion for illicit drug use”.

These figures are scary, but with adequate funding and services, and appropriate training for medical and therapeutic professionals, it can get better. This year, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services awarded $53 million in funding to 44 states to help address the opioid and heroin epidemic through prevention efforts, making treatment more readily available, and multiple other support services. There is also a growing amount of funding available to students wishing to learn about and work in the field of addictions counseling. Several of our Master’s students were awarded substantial fellowships through NAADAC this year, totaling over $90,000 in scholarships awarded to students in the addictions specialization. One of those students, Riley Cochran, said this about the field: “Especially in today’s world where substances are more readily available than help, it is imperative that those interested in the field of addiction counseling make significant efforts to reduce the stigmas of addiction and make treatment more readily available.”

The projected rate of growth in employment for Substance Abuse Counselors is 22%, making it one of the fastest growing career paths in the country. This means that over the next few years there will be more jobs in the field of addictions counseling than there are professionals to fill those jobs.

Here in the Counseling Psychology program, we offer Master’s students the opportunity to pursue a specialization in addictions counseling that covers timely and practical content that prepares students for jobs in the addictions counseling field. For students who wish to work in the state of Colorado, the specialization provides the coursework required for certification as a Colorado Addiction Counselor II (CAC II), making students especially qualified and hireable in a wide variety of mental health and school settings. Our program has a memorandum of understanding (MOU) with the Office of Behavioral Health, making the application process for certification simple and straight-forward. According to Master’s student and NAADAC fellow, Demi Folds, “This program enables me to take what is discussed in class and apply it to my work with clients almost immediately.” If you feel passionate about helping people, especially those suffering from substance abuse disorders, a Master of Arts in Clinical Mental Health Counseling with a specialization in addictions counseling might be for you. Check out our website for more information on the program.

FEBRUARY 8, 2017

Amidst all of the turmoil related to the President’s pick for Secretary of Education there are still many who are unclear as to what the role of the Secretary of Education is. To help provide clarity Denver’s 9 News asked Karen Riley, Ph.D. and Dean of the Morgridge College of Education, to explain a little about the Secretary’s position.

“Was it race that drove the results of the 2016 presidential election?” In his recent article for the American Psychological Association (APA) Patton O. Garriott, Assistant Professor of Counseling Psychology, addressed this important question. Dr. Garriott, an active member of both the APA and the Society for Vocational Psychology, weighed in on some of the psychology behind the election results specifically focusing on the way individual class and race effected voting trends.

Dr. Garriott ends the article by calling his peers to focus more on intersectional social class research. He states that, “extending intersectionality-focused scholarship devoted to social class will be critical to expanding our understanding of the complexities of individuals and systems to benefit future psychological science and practice.”

To read the full article visit the APA website.

The CASE Winter Leadership Conference, taking place Feb. 2-3, 2017, has a significant presence from students, faculty, and alumni from the Educational Leadership and Policy Studies (ELPS) department. Additionally, the Morgridge College of Education is a Bronze-level sponsor of the conference.

Congratulations to all ELPS faculty, students, and alumni presenting!

Faculty

Ellen Miller-Brown, Assistant Professor
Title:
Lessons from the Field: Fresh Research from Doctoral Candidates

Alumni

Dr. Tricia Johnson, Ed.D. Graduate, Vice President, Academic Affairs, Community College of Aurora
Title: Leading for Change: Developing Equitable College and Career Guidance Systems

Dr. Danny Medved, Ed.D. Graduate, Principal and Lead School Designer, Denver School of Innovation and Design, Denver Public Schools
Title: Enacting Vision and Navigating Change Case Study: A Technical Report to New School Designers and Stakeholders

Dr. Matthew Weyer, Ph.D. Graduate, Senior Policy Specialist, National Conference of State Legislatures
Title: The Every Student Succeeds Act and Redesignation: Implications for School Leaders

Students

Rana Razzaque, Ed.D. Student, Learning Partner, Social and Emotional Learning, Denver Public Schools
Title: The Enlightened Educator: Exploring the Influence of Mindful Self-Awareness on the Culturally Responsive Practices of Teachers

Lorna Beckett, Graduate Assistant and Ph.D. Candidate, University of Denver
Title: Predictors of Colorado Urban Principal Turnover

Co-Presentations

Rana Razzaque, Ed.D. Student, Learning Partner, Social and Emotional Learning, Denver Public Schools
Dr. Ellen Miller-Brown, Assistant Professor
Title: Leadership Matters: Leading for Civility, Cultural Responsiveness and Community Engagement


Dr. Doris Candelarie
, Clinical Assistant Professor
CJ Cain, M.A. Student
Theresa Gilbreath, M.A. Student
Title: Design Thinking for School Leaders

Higher Education Ph.D. candidate Varaxy Yi Borromeo has been recognized as the Asian Pacific American Network’s Outstanding Graduate Student of 2017. The award is presented by the American College Personnel Association (ACPA) Coalition for Multicultural Affairs (CMA). The CMA works to promote diversity within ACPA and addresses the changing cultural dynamics within higher education.

Yi joined the the Morgridge College of Education (MCE) community in 2013 and has had an “overwhelmingly positive experience.” She attributes her academic success to strong faculty support, opportunities to contribute to impactful projects, and a close-knit doctoral cohort. Yi is passionate about inclusive excellence, equity, inclusion, diversity, culturally engaging campus environments, and critical race theory, all of which are topics she has infused into coursework, research, and impact projects. Her research connects her to programs, organizations, and individuals whose experiences help to inform transformations in campus environments. One such organization is the Culturally Engaging Campus Environments (CECE) Project, where she currently serves as a Research Associate.

In addition to her studies, Yi participated in and led a number of research projects that contributed to a greater impact in her community. Most notably, as a Graduate Fellow for the University of Denver’s (DU) Interdisciplinary Research Incubator for the Study of (In)Equality (IRISE), Yi developed the Roger Salters Writing Institute in partnership with Anthea Johnson Rooen, Director of Graduate Student Success at the Center for Multicultural Excellence, and with support from the Writing Center and English department faculty to create a writing program for doctoral students from historically underrepresented communities. According to Yi, the Institute creates a cohort-based learning community in a collaborative, supportive environment to not only provide tips and strategies for productive writing but to address the vulnerabilities inherent in the writing process and to combat feelings of isolation in students’ programs. She considers the project to be one of her most significant accomplishments at DU.

Yi is expected to complete her studies in the Fall of 2017. She is honored to receive the award, and credits her success to her research team and community at MCE, saying that “similar to many other doctoral students of color, I face daily feelings of inadequacy and anxiety about the relevance and quality of my work…this recognition tells me that I am seen, my contributions are important, and I must continue my work to ensure that academia is a more equitable and inclusive space.”

Students from the Ricks Center for Gifted Children—a University of Denver model demonstration school which is a part of the Morgridge College of Education—are enrolled in the inaugural year of the Lamont Piano Preparatory Program, run by the Lamont School of Music at the University of Denver. Established by M.M. Piano Pedagogy program chair Chee-Hwa Tan, the preparatory program is designed to provide graduate students enrolled in Lamont’s M.M. Piano Pedagogy degree program with opportunities to gain practical teaching experience in both group and individual formats.

The preparatory program’s approach is experiential and immerses the Ricks students in an all-encompassing musical education through listening activities, interactive games, and reading exercises. Additionally, Ricks students are given an introduction to music history surrounding the pieces they learn. They participate in performances as part of the curriculum, and gave an inaugural public recital in January 2017. The preparatory program is designed to be a three-year experience for Ricks students; in the 2017-2018 academic year, the current first-year cohort will begin their second year, and a new cohort of students will enroll. Mary Beth Shaffer, coordinator for the preparatory program, says of the Ricks students that they are “a model group to work with.”

About the Ricks Center

The Ricks Center for Gifted Children was founded in 1984 by Norma Hafenstein, Ph.D., Morgridge College of Education (MCE) Clinical Professor & Daniel L. Ritchie Endowed Chair in Gifted Education. Furthermore, Dr. Hafenstein leads the Gifted Education Ed.D. Specialization in MCE’s Curriculum & Instruction program. Ricks current director Anne Sweet is thrilled with the Lamont partnership, saying that the preparatory program is a “wonderful opportunity” for the students to engage in higher-level creative learning.  The partnership exemplifies the One DU philosophy of the Chancellor’s strategic plan Impact 2025, benefitting the Ricks students and their families while providing a unique experiential opportunity for the students of the Lamont School.

Alumna Chloe Campbell (MLIS ’13) is finishing up work with the Peace Corps in Kyrgyzstan to share skill-building and resources on librarianship and information sciences. During a two-year residency in the country, Campbell has served as a Teaching English as a Second Language (TEFL) volunteer at a local state school, where she works with a Kyrgyz national English teacher to help build English language learning resources for the students and build professional skills for the teachers.

Campbell teaches classes with her Kyrgyz counterpart and works to integrate herself into the community. Additionally, she has undertaken a number of secondary projects in the region, including writing a grant to fund a girls’ leadership summer camp, teaching photography at a local youth organization, and creating a four-month library training program with American Corners—special libraries focusing on English language and American culture—in Kyrgyzstan’s capital city, Bishkek.

Chloe Campbell always wanted to be a librarian. She attended DU as an undergraduate, double-majoring in English Language and Literature and Italian Language with the long term goal of enrolling in the Morgridge College of Education’s Library and Information Science program as a graduate student. Furthermore, she specialized in archives and special libraries, and worked with a number of high-profile organizations including the National Archives and Glacier National Park.

After completing her MLIS degree, Campbell joined the Peace Corps because the values of the Corps align strongly with her personal values regarding serving communities, and she feels the experience will help advance her career in librarianship and information science after her tenure is complete in approximately four months. Her goals were to learn a new language, facilitate cultural exchange, and help the community fulfill their skill and resource needs. The benefits of her residency are mutual; the cultural exchange exposes American culture to her Kyrgyz community and teaches fellow Americans about a “kind, hospitable people.” Campbell says that “Both my personal goals and the goals set by Peace Corps go hand in hand making for an interesting, life-changing, and eye-opening two years of service.”


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