Child, Family, and School Psychology (CFSP)

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Child, Family, and School Psychology (CFSP)

SchoolPsy_400Is your goal to have a career that helps meet the educational and mental health needs of students and families? Our Child, Family and School Psychology (CFSP) program will provide you with the knowledge and skills relevant for collaboration with diverse families, students, educators and professionals within a rapidly changing global society.

Based on a strong understanding of the interrelationship between environmental, neurobiological and cultural influences on development, you will be prepared to solve problems and share decision-making with others to optimize social-emotional, cognitive, academic and behavioral outcomes for typically and atypically developing children from birth to age 21.

Our goal is to help you become a highly competent, collaborative, ethical and self-reflective scientist-practitioner as you work on behalf of individuals, families, schools and communities.

Why  should you choose Morgridge?

Our program is structured to provide you with integrated and well-supervised field experiences which we believe are an integral part of training you to become a school psychologist or child and family professional. Field coursework experiences are designed as a developmental Chain of Relevant Experiences (CoRE) where you will progress during coursework and through supervised field placements, initially as a Critical Observer, then as a Directed Participant, then as an Active Contributor, and finally as an Independent Practitioner, giving you opportunities to build and reflect upon professional roles and competencies and to master critical professional skills.

With our Counseling and Educational Services Clinic, a unique training and research facility located in the Morgridge College of Education, you will have opportunities for hands-on learning through participation in research, psychoeducational assessment and consultation for infants, children, adolescents and young adults (aged birth through 21 years old).

Because practice is an important part of learning, our program provides you with InContext experiences so you can apply what you are learning to real-world settings and issues:

  • Administer a comprehensive battery of psychoeducational assessments for elementary students at the Counseling and Educational Services Clinic
  • Conduct a refugee student art group at South High School in Denver Public Schools
  • Create a visual imagery assessment scale to identify reading comprehension difficulties in students with Autism Spectrum Disorders
  • Coordinate “Night Owls”–a community respite program offered once a month at the Fisher Early Learning Center
  • Evaluate needs and develop proactive intervention strategies at the College’s Ricks Center for Gifted Children

Complete part of your practicum with a partner school in China

Master of Arts in Child, Family and School Psychology

If you are interested in working in community agencies or educational settings that emphasize policy as it relates to direct service to young children and families, the Master’s of Arts in Child, Family and School Psychology is a good path for you. The MA courses are aligned with the CFSP School Psychology Doctoral degree and prepare students for further study.

Licensure as a school psychologist is not available with the MA in CFSP degree.

Graduation Requirements: This program requires successful completion of 45 quarter credit hours and an applied capstone project.

Approximate Completion Time: Less than two years

Tuition Cost: $1,104 per quarter credit hour for the 2013-2014 academic year (scholarships available)

Apply for CFSP MA

Education Specialist in Child, Family and School Psychology

Accredited by the National Association of School Psychologists (NASP),  the Child, Family and School Psychology Education Specialist (EdS) degree program helps prepare you for in all aspects of School Psychology services to work with children and families from birth to age 21 in school or community settings.

Upon completion of the program coursework and passing the Praxis II/National Association of School Psychology licensing exam, you are eligible for a Colorado Department of Education School Psychologist license and the National Association of School Psychologist’s National Certification (NCSP).

Optional Early Childhood School Psychology Concentration

By taking an additional 13 hours of integrated core and practical coursework, beyond that required for the EdS degree, you can earn a concentration in Early Childhood School Psychology.

Graduation Requirements: The EdS requires a minimum of 90 quarter credit hours and a 1,200 hour full-time internship. The EdS with the Early Childhood School Psychology Concentration requires a minimum of 103 quarter credit hours and a 1,200 hour full-time internship.

Approximate Completion Time: 2 years of coursework with a third year of a 1,200 hour full-time internship

Tuition Cost: $1,104 per quarter credit hour for the 2013-2014 academic year (scholarships available)

Apply for CFSP EdS

PhD in Child, Family and School Psychology

Our Child, Family and School Psychology doctoral program offers two tracks: one for students who are not licensed school psychologists (but wish to become licensed) and one for students who are currently licensed school psychologists.

In either track, you will take advanced classes in assessment, clinical practice, supervision and research methods that lead to concentrated expertise in the field.

If you are not a licensed school psychologist, the School Psychology PhD is the right option for you. The program prepares you in all aspects of doctoral-level school psychology services.

Upon completion of the program coursework and passing the Praxis II/National Association of School Psychology licensing exam, you are eligible for a Colorado Department of Education School Psychologist license and the National Association of School Psychologist’s National Certification (NCSP).

If you are currently a licensed school psychologist, the Pathway to PhD for EdS Professionals is a unique PhD program designed for EdS professionals like you who wish to deepen their expertise in the dynamic field of education and school psychology. This degree program meets the needs of experienced professionals and recent graduates with an EdS from a NASP approved program interested in enhancing their careers through the development of applied research and leadership skills.

Our program links professional knowledge and research with the world of practice in your chosen specialty area of study. You will take a flexible array of advanced courses in child and family studies, family and systems service delivery, organizational management, research and program evaluation and policy development that are designed to develop expertise matched to individual interests and proficiency.

Upon completion of the program coursework and passing the Praxis II/National Association of School Psychology licensing exam, you are eligible for a Colorado Department of Education School Psychologist license and the National Association of School Psychologist’s National Certification (NCSP).

Graduation Requirements: The PhD requires a minimum of 135 quarter credit hours, a supervised 1,500 hour full-time internship, comprehensive exam and a dissertation. The Pathways to PhD for EdS Professionals requires a minimum of 52 quarter credit hours in advanced coursework, comprehensive exam and a dissertation.

Approximate Completion Time:  The PhD takes approximately 3 to 4 years of full-time coursework and a final year of a 1,500 hour full-time internship. The Pathway to PhD for EdS Professionals takes approximately 2 years with full-time study or 3 years plus summers with part-time enrollment.

Tuition Cost: $1,104 per quarter credit hour for the 2013-2014 academic year (scholarships available)

Apply for CFSP PhD

Admissions Contact:

Sarah Blizzard
Sarah.Blizzard@du.edu
303-871-2503

Program FAQ

What does a school psychologist do?
  • There are a variety of ways to get more information on the profession of school psychology. Interested individuals can read about the profession by visiting the National Association of School Psychologists website. It is also helpful to read the prominent journals in the field including School Psychology Review, School Psychology Quarterly, Journal of School Psychology, and Psychology in the Schools. Another great way to understand the role of a school psychologist is to contact a practitioner in your community and ask to meet with him or her.
I am interested in counseling children and would like to apply to a program that will best prepare me. Can I receive an LPC in this program, or would it be more beneficial to apply to the general counseling program?
  • It is possible to receive an LPC in addition to your CFSP degree; however, it does add additional coursework and practica to your coursework plan, and will most likely take additional time to receive your degree. To coordinate this, contact Dr. Cindy McRae in the Counseling Psychology program at 303-871-2475. However, if you want to be a school counselor, you should apply to the Counseling Psychology master’s program.
Will I be able to work as a school psychologist in other states if I leave Colorado?
  • Most likely. Colorado has very stringent licensing requirements, thus students generally do not have a difficult time practicing in other states. Contact the Department of Education in the state you wish to practice in order to find out the necessary licensing qualifications.
What is an EdS degree?
  • The EdS degree is a very well established, high-level degree within the field. It is the basic practicing degree for School Psychology practitioners in Colorado and most other states. You can get more information on the EdS degree by contacting the National Association of School Psychologists. The EdS at DU is approved by NASP.
What criteria are considered for acceptance to the CFSP program?
  • The CFSP program takes a “whole person” philosophy when accepting students. Thus, in addition to looking at your scores on the GRE and transcripts, the admissions committee will also examine your letters of recommendation, statement of intent, and any prior experience that is applicable to the program to which you are applying.
If I have a degree from outside of psychology, will that reduce my chance of being accepted?
  • No. The CFSP program welcomes individuals with unique backgrounds to bring different perspectives to the program. However, depending on the degree you hold, you may have to take some additional coursework. Even with a degree outside of psychology, many students find that they have prior experiences that relate to the field they are pursuing.
When does the program start? Can I begin anytime?
  • The program begins each year in Fall Quarter which is typically the first or second week of September. On rare occasions, students can begin their studies in a different quarter. However, this is arranged on a case-by-case basis only. Students should contact the Office of Admissions and Enrollment Services to explore this option.
How many students will you be accepting and do you have an estimate of how many people will be applying?
  • The number of applications we receive from year to year varies; however, on average we typically receive 60 to 70 applications per year between the MA, EdS and PhD programs. From this, 20 to 22 students are elected for spots in the three different degree programs.
I would love to set up an appointment with someone in your department who could provide me with a better understanding of the CFSP program at DU and be able to discuss my options. Is that possible?
  • Yes. Although not mandatory, we encourage prospective students to see the campus, meet current students and faculty, and attend classes. Again, this is part of the onsite interview day and probably your best means of getting a feel for our program. If that is not an option, call the Morgridge College of Education Office of Admissions and Enrollment Services at 303-871-2509 or 800-835-1607, or email at edinfo@du.edu, and they will help you plan your visit. It is preferable if you would arrange for visits through the Admissions Office and not through individual faculty.
Does every student get a paid internship?
  • Yes. Program faculty will work with you to set up a paid internship in the community of your choice. All internship sites must meet all Program and national accreditation standards and must be approved officially by the Program Chair.
Can I take an internship out of state?
  • Yes. It is possible to complete your internship in another state; however it does require extra work and planning to ensure that the internship site and supervisor meet our internship requirements.
Does the program arrange for the internship placements?
  • Program faculty help mentor and facilitate the internship placement process, but students are hired by districts as interns. Students are required to actively pursue particular internships they desire and complete the interviewing process. All internships must be approved by the program director prior to the beginning of the internship year.
What kinds of internship placements are there?
  • There are internship placements available in public and private school settings, alternative school settings, community agencies and home-based agencies. Specific sites must be approved by the program director prior to the internship year.
What funding or assistantships are there for graduate students?
  • A variety of types of aid are available for graduate students in the CFSP program. A select number of stipends are available for incoming students who are paired with a faculty mentor to conduct research in their area of interest. Advanced students often have the opportunity to obtain stipends for similar work. There are a limited number of Graduate Teaching Assistantships and Graduate Research Assistantships also available to advanced students in the program that provide some tuition reimbursement as well as monthly stipends. Scholarship money is also available on a yearly basis to students in the program that apply and have a Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) form on file. Lastly, federal financial aid is available. For information on financial aid, visit the Office of Financial Aid.
Do I have to come as a full-time student?
  • For the EdS degrees and PhD in School Psychology, it highly advised to be a full-time student to follow the coursework sequence. Additionally, much of the financial aid offered to graduate students stipulates full-time enrollment.
What does full-time enrollment mean?
  • Full-time enrollment status in a graduate program is achieved by taking a minimum of 8 credit hours per quarter. However, specific fellowships may require a student to complete 9 credit hours per quarter.
If I come to get my MA or EdS in your program, will I be able to go on for a doctorate?
  • MA or EdS students in the CFSP program cannot automatically transfer into the PhD program. However, students who show interest in pursuing a PhD, demonstrate success in their coursework, and are engaged in scholarly and research pursuits, are encouraged to apply.
How can I be involved in faculty research?
  • All CFSP program faculty are very active in their research interests. For a description of faculty members and their research interests, see the Faculty section. Faculty always welcome student interest and participation, and are often looking for members of ongoing research discussion groups.
Is your program approved by NASP or accredited by APA?

General FAQ

General Questions
When does the program start? Can I begin anytime?
  • Most programs begin each year in Fall Quarter which is typically the first or second week of September. Some programs, such as the Teacher Preparation Programs and the Some programs, such as the Teacher Preparation Programs and the Educational Leadership and Policy Studies Programs, begin in the Summer Quarter (early June). On rare occasions, students can begin their studies in a different quarter, however, this is arranged on a case-by-case basis only. Students should contact the Morgridge Office of Admissions at edinfo@du.edu to explore this option.
What does full-time enrollment mean?
  • Full-time enrollment status in a graduate program is achieved by taking a minimum of 8 credit hours per quarter. However, specific funding may require a student to complete 9 credit hours per quarter.
Are classes offered online?
  • The majority of our classes are offered on campus, however, there are a few courses that are offered either in a blended format (online with some on-campus meeting times) or online. Blackboard is an online tool used by most faculty at DU to provide access to selected course materials, no matter the setting of the class meetings.
How many students are in a typical class?
  • Our average class size is generally between 20 and 25 students, but many classes will have 8 to 10 students.

 

Learning More About Programs and DU

Can I set up an appointment to visit the campus and discuss program options?
  • Yes. Although not mandatory, we encourage prospective students to see the campus, meet current students, and attend classes. This is probably your best means of getting a feel for our program. To set up a campus visit call the Morgridge College of Education Office of Admissions and Enrollment Services at (303) 871-2509 or (800) 835-1607, or email at edinfo@du.edu. It is preferable if you would arrange for visits through the Admissions Office and not through individual faculty.
Can I talk to a student from the program?
  • Yes. We encourage prospective students to communicate with current students in order to get the clearest possible picture of graduate life at the University of Denver. We have current Student Ambassadors on hand to meet with prospective students to share their experiences and speak to life in the Morgridge culture.  Contact the Morgridge College of Education Office of Admissions at edinfo@du.eduto be connected to a Student Ambassador or another current student in your program of interest.

 

Application and Admissions

How important are my GRE scores for admission?
  • Not all programs require a GRE score. In most programs, GRE scores are not the deciding factor for admittance; they are only one of many criteria used for admissions evaluation.
What if I do not have GRE scores? Can I use another test I took?
  • When required for admissions consideration, the GRE is the only test accepted. Regardless of the requirement to submit GRE scores, all international applicants/non-native English speakers are required to submit an official, valid TOEFL score.
From whom should I get letters of recommendation?
  • It is best to obtain letters of recommendation from professors or professionals who know you well. For recent graduates, ask for recommendation letters from former professors that can speak to your academic abilities as well as your character. For individuals entering the program with years of work experience, letters of recommendation from professionals who have seen your ability to work with children, adolescents and/or families are recommended.Most importantly, choose individuals that are knowledgeable about your past experiences as well as your goals for the future, and who know you well enough to adequately discuss your accomplishments and potential.
Is an interview required for admission?
  • Yes, interviews are required as part of the admissions process. If you are selected for an interview, you will be notified of the interview dates and location details. If you are unable to come to your in-person interview, you may complete your interview via Skype or phone.  We strongly encourage you to attend the on-campus interview day as it will provide the best opportunity for you to learn about the program, see the campus, meet current students and experience the Morgridge culture for yourself.
What is required for application to Morgridge College of Education?
  • The application materials may include: a completed online application, a 2 to 3 page statement of goals, resume, official transcripts from every higher education institution attended, letters of recommendation (2 for MA, 2 or 3 for PhD, depending upon the program), a $65 application fee, and GRE scores for specific programs (which should be sent directly to the university).
When will I hear about the status of my application?
  • Applicants will receive an email that their application was received by the DU Graduate Studies Admissions Office and will be notified if there is any missing information. Students are encouraged to check on the status of their application materials by emailing gradinfo@du.edu. Once an application file is complete, the file is sent to the Morgridge College of Education Office of Admissions to be reviewed by program faculty. Typically, decisions about acceptance into a program are made two to three weeks following the on-campus interview day. To check on admission decisions, you may contact the Morgridge College of Education Admissions office at (303) 871-2509 or (800) 835-1607 or email at edinfo@du.edu.
Can I defer my admissions or change my entry term if necessary?
  • Some graduate programs allow deposited students to request a one-time change of admit term to indicate a start term one quarter early or a deferment to the date of his/her intended enrollment for up to one academic year. Contact the Morgridge Office of Admissions at edinfo@du.edu for more information about changing your admissions term.
 

Waivers and Transfer Credits

Can I transfer credit from an undergraduate class?
  • No, only graduate-level courses can be transferred and the course must have been taken within the last five years and from an accredited program. Transfer credits cannot have been used toward another degree. There is a limit to the number of graduate credits you can transfer into DU based on the degree you are applying to (see below). If it is appropriate to waive a course (e.g. similar course already taken, content knowledge demonstrated, or successful test-out for certain research courses) the course credit hours must still be utilized for another course. A waived course does not mean a reduction in credit hours required. If your undergraduate work is similar in content to a required graduate course, you may be able to waive a required course after a review of the content with your advisor. A waived course allows you to take another graduate course in place of the one we require if you have already taken a course with very similar content. Transfer courses are different than waived courses since they reduce the number of credits you take at DU.
What graduate coursework is accepted as transfer credit?
  • Transferring graduate coursework into DU is discussed on an individual basis with your advisor. If you wish to transfer in comparable graduate-level coursework, you will need to bring in the syllabus, text, other course materials, and you must have an official transcript on file from the institution. The transfer must be initiated through your advisor in the first quarter of your program. The graduate coursework you wish to transfer must be no more than five years old, cannot have been counted toward another degree, and must be transferred in your first quarter of enrollment at the University of Denver. A maximum of 10 quarter hour credits may be transferred into the MA and a maximum of 15 quarter hour credits may be transferred into the EdS, PhD and EdD programs. Graduate coursework that is transferred in will reduce the total number of DU credits you will need to graduate.
Will my graduate coursework for my previous graduate degree count?
  • Credits that have already been applied to a degree cannot be counted again toward another degree. If the credit was not used toward another degree, see above for information on transfer credits. For more information or to discuss your specific situation, contact the Morgridge Office of Admissions at edinfo@du.edu.

 

Internships and Assistantships

Does every student get a paid internship?
  • No, not all internships are paid.  Program faculty will work with you to set up an internship in the community or school of your choice. Some internships are paid and some are not.  All internship sites must meet all program standards and must be approved officially by the Program Chair or designee.
Can I take an internship out of state?
  • Yes. It is possible to complete your internship in another state for most programs; however it does require extra work and planning to ensure that the internship site and supervisor meet our internship requirements. To determine if this is an option for your program, contact the Morgridge Office of Admissions at edinfo@du.edu.
Does the program arrange for the internship placements?
  • Program faculty help mentor and facilitate the internship placement process, but students generally must apply and be selectedby the organization as interns. Students are required to actively pursue particular internships they desire and complete the interviewing process. All internships must be approved by the program director or designee prior to the beginning of the internship year.
What funding or assistantships are there for graduate students?
  • A variety of types of aid are available for graduate students. A select number of stipends are available for incoming students who are paired with a faculty mentor to conduct research in their area of interest. Advanced students often have the opportunity to obtain stipends for similar work. There are a limited number of Graduate Teaching Assistantships and Graduate Research Assistantships also available to advanced students in the program that provide some tuition reimbursement as well as monthly stipends.

 

Tuition and Financial Aid

What is the cost of tuition?
Will I need to pay out-of-state tuition, or how do I get in-state tuition?
  • The University of Denver is a private institution, thus tuition is the same for both in-state and out-of-state students. For an estimate of yearly costs, visit the Office of Financial Aid.
Are scholarships available?
Is financial aid available?
  • In order to apply for financial aid at the University of Denver, and be considered for federal grants and scholarships, you must have a current Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) form on file. Federal financial aid is available to qualified students. For information on financial aid, visit the Office of Financial Aid.Student employment may also be available for graduate students. Financial Aid requires students to be enrolled in a minimum of 4 quarter credit hours in a term.

 

Insurance, Immunizations and Housing

What kinds of insurance coverage do graduate students receive?
  • Graduate students have the option of obtaining their own private health insurance or using the health insurance provided by the University of Denver. For specific information regarding the coverage under the University of Denver’s plan, visit the Health and Counseling Center.
What immunizations are required for students?
  • All students must show proof of MMR (measles, mumps, rubella) immunization. (CO Revised Statuses 25-4-901 to 909) Students will NOT be able to register for classes without providing this information. Exemptions for medical, religious or personal reasons may be submitted. See the Health and Counseling Center website for more information on immunizations and a link to the Certificate of Immunization form.
What is the cost of housing?
  • Graduate students have the choice to live on or off the University of Denver campus. Information regarding on-campus housing can be found at Housing and Residential Educationand includes information about building options, dining plans, parking and other related information. Off-campus housing information includes links to nearby apartment complexes as well as information about how to find roommates, transportation, childcare, banks and other information regarding living in the area.
Dittrick-Nathan, Karin, PhD : Assistant Clinical Professor

Dittrick-Nathan, Karin, PhD

Assistant Clinical Professor

303-871-2838, KRH 146
kdittric@du.edu

Dr. Dittrick-Nathan received her PhD from the University of Denver. She has worked extensively serving students from preschool through young adulthood with learning and developmental disabilities in public school and clinical settings. As Coordinator for Rocky Mountain Talent Search, she was responsible for programming for gifted and talented middle school students. Dr. Dittrick-Nathan worked as an Academic Counselor at the Learning Effectiveness Program on the University campus, advising and tutoring students with diagnosed learning disabilities. Prior to teaching at the University, she worked as a school psychologist in Jefferson County. Dr. Dittrick-Nathan holds current Colorado licenses in Counseling Psychology and School Psychology. Dr. Dittrick-Nathan served as the Co-Director of the Counseling and Educational Services Clinic from 2000-2004, where she supervised students taking their Clinic Practicum. Her research interests include working effectively with adolescents and families, problem gambling in adolescents, and process addiction. Dr. Dittrick-Nathan enjoys her family, travel, and watercolor painting.

Portfolio

Hazel, Cynthia E, PhD : Associate Professor and Program Coordinator

Hazel, Cynthia E, PhD

Associate Professor and Program Coordinator

303-871-2961, KRH 256
chazel@du.edu

Dr. Hazel received her PhD from the University of Northern Colorado.  She has coordinated arts-based after-school programs for urban youth, served as the Behavior Evaluation and Support Teams Coordinator for the Colorado Department of Education, and practiced as a school psychologist in communities of predominately poor, Latino families from preschool through secondary levels.  Dr. Hazel is also a Nationally Certified School Psychologist through the National Association of School Psychologists and the President of the Trainers of School Psychologists.  Her research interests include student school engagement, data-driven decision making, supporting students to graduate from high school with their cohort, preventing bullying, and consulting.  Dr. Hazel has one daughter and likes to raft with her family in the summer and ski with them in the winter.

Portfolio

Miller, Gloria E, PhD : Professor

Miller, Gloria E, PhD

Professor

303-871-3340, KRH 254
Gloria.Miller@du.edu

Dr. Miller received her PhD from the University of Wisconsin-Madison.  After graduation, she took a position in the Department of Psychology at the University of South Carolina where she taught undergraduate and graduate students for 11 years, practiced as a school psychologist, served as the undergraduate program director, and co-directed the Child and Family Studies Center, a NIMH research project investigating family-based treatment to prevent aggressive and challenging behaviors in young children. Dr. Miller’s publications include articles, chapters, and books on home and school prevention and intervention strategies to enhance early literacy, self-regulation and social emotional development. Her personal interests include reading, hiking, skiing, tennis, gardening, traveling, and "playing" with her husband of over 35 years and her daughter.

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Pollard-Durodola, Sharolyn, EdD : Morgridge Endowed Associate Professor in Literacy, Child, Family, & School Psychology and Curriculum Studies Teaching

Pollard-Durodola, Sharolyn, EdD

Morgridge Endowed Associate Professor in Literacy, Child, Family, & School Psychology and Curriculum Studies Teaching

303-871-3352, KRH 255
Sharolyn.Pollard-Durodola@du.edu

Dr. Pollard-Durodola received her EdD from the University of Houston.  She has 14 years of school-based experiences (school administrator, reading specialist and teacher) in high-poverty settings, and prior to joining the University of Denver, Dr. Pollard-Durodola served as Associate Professor of the Bilingual Education Program in the Department of Educational Psychology at Texas A&M University.  Central to her scholarship is an interest in developing intervention curricula that build on validated instructional design principles, evaluating their impact on the language and reading development of struggling readers (Spanish/English), and investigating how to improve the teaching quality of language/literacy practices of teachers of young English Language Learners (ELLs) and non-ELLs who are at risk for reading difficulties.  Dr. Pollard-Durodola enjoys photography and visiting lighthouses.

Portfolio site coming soon!

Riley, Karen S, PhD : Interim Dean and Associate Professor

Riley, Karen S, PhD

Interim Dean and Associate Professor

303-871-3665, KRH 326
Karen.Riley@du.edu

Dr. Riley received her PhD from the University of Denver.  She worked as a special education preschool teacher and administrator for many years. Dr. Riley currently works with several organizations that serve children with neurodevelopmental disorders and their families.  Her research interests are early childhood intervention and assessment, neurodevelopmental disorders (specifically Fragile X Syndrome and XXYY Disorder), and effective identification and intervention for children and families with other low incidence disabilities. Dr. Riley is married and has two teen-aged children. When she's not working, she enjoys traveling, hiking, running, and reading.

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Child, Family and School Psychology Important Dates:
  • Application Deadline – MA, EdS and PhD with Licensure: We will continue to accept and review well-qualified applicants for the Fall 2014 class until the remaining space has been filled.
  • Application Deadline – PhD Pathways for EdS Professionals: We will continue to accept and review well-qualified applicants for the Fall 2014 class until the remaining space has been filled.
  • Meet Us @ Morgridge Visit Day:  Thanks for your interest in the Child, Family and School Psychology program. Please visit us again for upcoming dates and times!

Please RSVP at least one week prior by sending an email to edinfo@du.edu or at 303-871-2509. Once you have indicated you will attend, you will receive a confirmation and more information about the event. If you are unable to attend this event, contact the Morgridge Office of Admissions at edinfo@du.edu to schedule a visit or learn more about the program.

Graduates from the CFSP program have expanded career opportunities in schools and in the community and are able to work in a broad range of educational, medical, research or treatment-oriented environments at the local, state and national levels. Additionally, PhD students are prepared for administrative, supervisory, teaching and research positions in institutions of higher education.

In Colorado, the average starting salary for a school psychologist ranges from $40,000 to $50,000 per school year. Nationally, the average starting salary is even higher, especially if you are bilingual.

All graduates of the CFSP program that seek jobs gain employment after graduation.

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