2020-2021 Faculty Publications

Our faculty have published more than 200 articles, books, chapters, and other resources recently. The list below is organized by department, author (last name, first name), and publication type. If you are looking for a specific author, topic, or resource:

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If you are a faculty member and have a publication to share that is not included below, please send details to mce.marketing@du.edu.

Counseling Psychology

Blueford, Jillian M. 

  • Book Chapter 
    • Adams, C. R., & Blueford, J. M. (2021). Children and adolescents in disrupted family systems. In R. Byrd (Ed.), Counseling children and adolescents: Cultivating empathic connection. New York: Routledge. 
  • Newsletter 
    • Blueford, J. M.-L., & Pinto, S. A. (2020). How social media can retraumatize Black students. Rocky Mountain Association for Counselor Education and Supervision (RMACES) Summer Newsletter. 

Brownstone, Lisa M. 

  • Journal Article, Academic Journal 
    • Brownstone, L. M., & Bardone-Cone, A. M. (2020). Subjective binge eating: A marker of disordered eating and broader psychological distress. Eating and Weight Disorders: Studies on Anorexia, Bulimia, and Obesity. 
    • Brownstone, L. M., DeRieux, J., Kelly, D. A., Sumlin, L. J., & Gaudiani, J. L. (2020). Body mass index requirements for gender-affirming surgeries are not empirically based. Transgender Health. 
    • Brownstone, L. M., Kelly, D. A., Ko, S., Jasper, M. L., Sumlin, L. J., Hall, J., . . . & Goffredi, A. R. (2021). Dismantling weight stigma: A group intervention in a partial hospitalization and intensive outpatient eating disorder treatment program. Psychotherapy. 

Garriott, Pat O. 

  • Journal Article, Academic Journal 
    • Garriott, P. O., Hunt, H., Navarro, R. L., Flores, L. Y., Lee, B. H., Suh, H. N., Brionez, J., Slivensky, D., & Lee, H.-S. (2021). Development and initial validation of the Engineering Learning Experiences Scale. Journal of Vocational Behavior, 124. 
    • Duffy, R. D., Kim, H. J., Gensmer, N. P., Pendleton, L. H., Boren, S., & Garriott, P. O. (2021). Testing a critical cultural wealth model of well-being among first-generation students. Journal of Counseling Psychology, 67(2), 103516. https://doi.org/10.1037/cou0000388. 0022-0167. 
    • Garriott, P. O., Chao, H. I., Jessen, M., Jordan, R. A., Galluzzo, J. A., Hadjeasgari, C., . . . & Allan, B. A. (2020). Development and validation of the College Social-Emotional Crossroads Inventory. Journal of Career Assessment, 28(3), 496-511. 
    • Raque-Bogdan, T., Ratchford, J., Garriott, P. O., Borges, N., & Duffy, R. (2020). Counseling psychologists in medical education in the United States: Career development, professional identity, and training implications. Counselling Psychology Quarterly, 33(2), 218-244. 

O’Malley, John A. 

  • Journal Article, Academic Journal 
    • O’Malley, J. A., Teman, E. D., & Dzik, P. W. (2020). Discovering islands of competence through play: Experiences of individuals with a learning disability. Journal of Creativity in Mental Health. 

Owen, Jesse J. 

  • Journal Article, Academic Journal 
    • Cross, W. E., Drinane, J. M., Owen, J. J., Schmidt, C. K., Raque-Bogdan, T., Hook, J. N., . . . & Ajibade, A. (2020). Uncovering alternate ethnic identity trajectories: A cluster analysis of the MEIM and psychological well-being. Race and Social Problems, 12, 103-111. 
    • Raque-Bogdan, T., Ash-Lee, S., Mitchell, J., Joseph, E. C., Ross, K. V., Solberg, M. E., & Owen, J. J. (2020). A group positive psychology intervention for cancer survivors and caregivers: A pilot study of Activating Happiness©. Journal of Psychosocial Oncology, 38(6), 649-669. 
    • Kivlighan, D. M., Owen, J., & Antle, B. (2020). Do racial/ethnic disparities differ between groups? Testing the cultural effectiveness of racially diverse relationship education groups. Couple and Family Psychology: Research and Practice, 9, 1-12. 
    • Quirk, K., Owen, J., Reese, R. J., Babins-Wagner, R., & Berzins, S. (2020). Benchmarking community-based couple therapy: Considering measurement reactivity. Family Process, 59, 1423-1433.  
    • Jankowski, P., Sandage, S., Bell, C., Davis, D., Porter, E., Jessen, M., Motzny, C., Ross, K., Owen, J. (2020). Virtue, flourishing and positive psychology in psychotherapy: An overview and research prospectus. Psychotherapy, 57, 291-309. 
    • Palmer, R., Owen, J., & Frazier, P. (2021). Trajectories of changes in distress in counseling center clients: A replication study. Psychotherapy Research, 31, 289-301. 
    • Roncoroni, J., Dong, Y., Owen, J., Wippold, G. (2021). The association of sleep duration and feeling rested with health in US Hispanic women. Sleep Medicine, 83, 54-62. 
    • Coleman, J. J., Drinane, J. M., Owen, J., & Kopta, S. M. (2021). Establishing expectations: Exploring session limits in university counseling centers. Journal of College Student Psychotherapy, 35(2) 103-117.  
    • Pace, B. T., Kuo, P., Tao, K., Owen, J., Van Epps, J., Davies, R., Imel, Z. E. (2021). Determining the therapist’s contribution in therapist multicultural competence process and outcome. Journal of Counseling Psychology, 68, 149-155.  
    • Anders, C., Kivlighan III, D. M., Porter, E., Lee, D. L., & Owen, J.  (2021). Attending to the intersectionality and saliency of clients’ identities: A further investigation of therapists’ multicultural orientation. Journal of Counseling Psychology, 68, 139-148. 
    • Dolgin, R., Riva, M. T., & Owen, J. J. (2020). Clinical congruence of cohesion in group psychotherapy. Professional Psychology: Research and Practice, 51(6), 598-605. 
  • Book 
    • Davis, D., DeBlaere, C., Hook, J., & Owen, J. (2020). Mindfulness-based practices in therapy: A cultural humility approach. American Psychological Association: Washington, DC.  
  • Book Chapter 
    • Captari, Laura E.; Nyiransekuye, Hadidja; Zaremba, Jolie Shelton; Gerber, Monica; Hook, Joshua N.; Davis, Don E.; Owen, Jesse; Van Tongeren, Daryl R.; In: Refugee mental health. Aten, Jamie D. (Ed); Hwang, Jenny (Ed); Publisher: American Psychological Association; 2021, pp. 45-75.   

Pinto, Stacy A. 

  • Journal Article, Academic Journal 
    • Lardier, Jr., D. T., Opara, I., Brammer, M. K., Pinto, S. A., Garcia-Reid, P., & Reid, R. J. (2021). Psychological sense of community, community civic participation, and ethnic identity on social justice orientation and psychological empowerment between LGBQ and non-LGBQ youth of color. Journal of LGBT Youth. 
  • Newsletter 
    • Blueford, J. M.-L., & Pinto, S. A. How social media can retraumatize Black students. Rocky Mountain Association for Counselor Education and Supervision (RMACES) Summer Newsletter. 

Raque-Bogdan, Trisha 

  • Journal Article, Academic Journal 
    • Cross, W. E., Drinane, J. M., Owen, J. J., Raque-Bogdan, T., Schmidt, C. K., Hook, J. N., . . . & Ajibade, A. (2020). Uncovering alternate ethnic identity trajectories: A cluster analysis of the MEIM and psychological well-being. Race and Social Problems, 12, 103-111.  
    • Duffy, R., Prieto, C. G., Kim, H. J., Raque-Bogdan, T., & Duffy, N. O. (2021). Decent work and physical health: A multi-wave investigation. Journal of Vocational Behavior, 127, 103544. 
    • Raque-Bogdan, T., Ash-Lee, S., Mitchell, J., Joseph, E. C., Ross, K. V., Solberg, M. E., & Owen, J. J. (2020). A group positive psychology intervention for cancer survivors and caregivers: A pilot study of Activating Happiness©. Journal of Psychosocial Oncology, 38(6), 649-669. 
    • Raque-Bogdan, T., Nellis, R., Becker, R., Solberg, M. E., & Zech, O. (2021). Walking on thin ice: How cancer survivors manage disclosure at work. Journal of Psychosocial Oncology, 39(2), 252-267. 
    • Raque-Bogdan, T., Ratchford, J., Garriott, P. O., Borges, N., & Duffy, R. (2020). Counseling psychologists in medical education in the United States: Career development, professional identity, and training implications. Counselling Psychology Quarterly, 33(2), 218-244.  

Rian, Sage 

  • Peer Reviewed Journal Article 
    • Rian, S. W. (2021). Increased exposure to nature reduces elementary students’ anxiety.  Ecopsychology. 
  • Book Chapter (in my birth name)  
    • Sheridan, B. (2020). Skipping stones In M. E. Delaney (Ed.), Nature is nurture: Counseling  and the natural world (pp. 94-98). New York, NY: Oxford University Press.  

Riva, Maria 

  • Journal Article, Academic Journal 
    • De La Rosa, S., & Riva, M.T. (2020, November). Relationship Variables in Group Psychotherapy for Women Sexual Trauma Survivors, International Journal of Group Psychotherapy. Special Issue on Groups for Women. 1-36. 
    • Cornish, J.E., Smith, R.D, & Riva, M.T. (2020). In defense of the Ethics Code: A comment on O’Donohue (2019). Ethics & Behavior, 30, 299-302.  
    • Dolgin, R., Riva, M. T., & Owen, J. (2020, March 26). Clinical Congruence of Cohesion in Group Psychotherapy. Professional Psychology: Research and PracticeProfessional Psychology: Research and Practice, 51(6), 598-605 

Roncoroni, Julia 

  • Journal Article, Academic Journal 
    • Roncoroni, J., Dong, Y., Owen, J., Wippold, G. The association of sleep duration and feeling  rested with health in U.S. adult Latinas. (In Press). Sleep Medicine 
    • Roncoroni, J., Frank, M. G., Hudson, A. L., Wu Whitaker, S., Edelman, A. K., Garcia, P., . . . & Ratchford, J. L. (2021). Latinx patients’ perception of culturally sensitive health care and their association with patient satisfaction, patient-provider communication, and therapeutic alliance. Journal of Racial and Ethnic Health Disparities. 
    • Roncoroni, J., Hernandez-Julian, R., Hendrix, T., & Whitaker, S. W. (2021). Breaking barriers: Evaluating a pilot STEM Intervention for Latinx children of Spanish-speaking families. Journal of Science Education and Technology. 
    • Tucker, C.M., Roncoroni, J., Klein, K.G., Derias, T.O., Ateyah, W., Williams, J., Nmezi, N.A., Shah, N.A., Bilello, L.A., Anton, S. Views of Black Women Patients with Obesity on Desired and Undesired Weight Focused Clinical Encounters. (In Press). Clinical Obesity. 
    • Wippold, G. M., Tucker, M., Roncoroni, J., & Henry, M. A. (2020). Impact of stress and loneliness on health-related quality of life among low income senior African Americans. Journal of Racial and Ethnic Health Disparities.  

Educational Leadership & Policy Studies

Anderson, Erin 

  • Brief 
    • Anderson, E., Hayes, S., & Carpenter, B. (2020). Principal as the caretaker of all: Responding to needs of others and self. CPRE Policy Briefs, 92. Philadelphia, PA: Consortium for Policy Research in Education. 
    • Banwo, B., Anderson, E., Childs, J., & Stone-Johnson, C. (2020). An examination of challenges educators and families faced in the aftermath of COVID-19. Philadelphia, PA: Consortium for Policy Research in Education. 
  • Journal Article, Academic Journal 
    • Anderson, E., Budhwani, S., & Perone, F. (2020). State of states: Landscape of university-based pathways to the principalship. Journal of School Leadership. 
    • Davis, B. W., & Anderson, E. (2020). The potential of alluvial diagrams for advancing educational research. Teachers College Record, July 2. 
  • Other Publications 
    • Young, M., & Anderson, E. (2020). The research base for the National Educational Leadership Preparation (NELP) standards: Building level. Washington, DC: National Policy Board for Educational Administration (NPBEA). 

Hesbol, Kristina A. 

  • Academic/Professional Blog Contributor 
  • Journal Article, Academic Journal 
    • Hesbol, K., Bartee, J. S., & Amiri, F. (2020). Activism in practice: The influence of a rural school leader’s beliefs and practices in disrupting historical patterns of underachievement in traditionally marginalized students. Impacting Education, 5(2), 33-42. 

Richardson, Jayson W. 

  • Book Chapter 
    • Brantmeier, E., Richardson, J. W., Xharra, B., & Brantmeier, N. (2021). From head to hand to global community: Social media, digital diplomacy, and post-conflict peacebuilding in Kosovo. In M. A. Naseem, & A. Arshad-Ayaz, Social media as a space for peace education (pp. 61-81). Cham, Switzerland: Palgrave Macmillan. 
    • Horsford, S. D., Mountford, M., & Richardson, J. W. (2021). Community relationships. In C. H. Tienken (Ed.), The American superintendent 2020 decennial study (pp. 65-78). Lanham, MD: Rowman and Littlefield. 
    • Richardson, J. W. (2020). Introduction: Innovative leadership practices in international school. In J. W. Richardson (Ed.), Bringing innovative practices to your school: Lessons from international schools (pp. xviii-xi). New York: Routledge. 
  • Editor, Book 
    • Richardson, J. W. (2020). Bringing innovative practices to your school: Lessons from international schools. New York, NY: Routledge. 
  • Journal Article, Academic Journal 
    • Dexter, S., & Richardson, J. W. (2020). What does the technology integration research tell us about the leadership of technology? Journal of Research on Technology in Education, 52(1), 17-36. 
    • Mahfouz, J., & Richardson, J. W. (2020). At the crossroads: Well-being and principal preparation. Journal of Research on Leadership Education. https://doi.org/10.1177/1942775120933914 
    • Richardson, J. W., Carr, M., & Watts, J. (2020). A case study of educational leadership doctoral students: Developing culturally competent school leadership through study abroad. International Journal of Doctoral Studies, 15, 541-558. 
    • Richardson, J. W., Hollis, E., Pritchard, M., & Novosel-Lingat, J. E. M. (2020). Shifting teaching and learning in online learning spaces: An investigation of a faculty online teaching and learning initiative. Online Learning Journal, 24(1), 67-91. 
    • Richardson, J. W., Sterrett, W., & Clemens, J. (2020). Technology and stakeholder engagement: Perspectives from the top. Research in Educational Administration and Leadership, 5(4), 954-988. 
    • Sindhvad, S., Richardson, J. W., Evanov, A., & Lingat, J. E. M. (2020). Predictors of public school leadership capacity in Bishkek. FIRE: Forum for International Research in Education, 6(2), 22-44. 
    • Sterrett, W., & Richardson, J. W. (2020). Leading a tech-savvy school: Reinventing learning through collaboration and innovation. Kappa Delta Pi Record, 56(3), 100-104. 
    • Sterrett, W., & Richardson, J. W. (2020). Supporting professional development through digital principal leadership. Journal of Organizational & Educational Leadership, 5(2), 1-19. 
    • Watts, D. S., & Richardson, J. W. (2020). Leveraging professional development to build professional capital in international schools in Asia. Journal of Professional Capital and Community, 5(2). 

Tabron, Lolita A. 

  • Book Chapter 
    • Tabron, L.A., *Hunt-Khabir, K., *Thomas, A.K. (2020). Disrupting Whiteness in Introductory Statistics Course Design: Implications for Educational Leadership. In C. Mullen (Ed.), Handbook of Social Justice Interventions in Education. Springer 
  • Technical Report
    • Tabron, L.A., Thomas, A.K., Reynolds, A.L., Korach, S., (2021). Cultivating and Sustaining a Diverse Principal Pipeline. Completed for the Denver Public School District. 
  • Podcast

Higher Education

Gildersleeve, Ryan E. 

  • Editorial 
    • Gildersleeve, R. E. (2020). Higher education in times of crisis and disaster, part one. About Campus, 25(3), 3-4. 
    • Gildersleeve, R. E. (2020). Redefining community. About Campus, 25(2), 3. 
  • Journal Article, Academic Journal 
    • Gildersleeve, R. E., & Sifuentez, B. J. (2021). Border U. Policy Futures in Education. 
    • Orphan, C. M., Laderman, S., & Gildersleeve, R. E. (2021). Advocates or honest information brokers? Examining the higher education public policy agenda setting processes of intermediary organizations. Review of Higher Education, 44(3), 325-355. 
  • Technical Report  
    • Gildersleeve, R. E. (2020). Evaluation of fund sueños: Qualitative findings. Colorado Mountain College.  

Hurtado, Sarah S. 

  • Journal Article, Academic Journal 
    • Hurtado, S. S. (2020). How Neoliberalism Shapes the Role and Responsibility of Faculty Members for Eliminating Sexual Violence. The Journal of Higher Education, 1-24. 
  • Professional Organization Position Statement 
    • Marine, S., & Hurtado, S. S. Association for the Study of Higher Education (ASHE) response to the Department of Education’s May 2020 regulations on Title IX of the Higher Education Act of 1972 (Nondiscrimination on the Basis of Sex in Education Programs or Activities Receiving Federal Financial Assistance). Las Vegas, NV: Association for the Study of Higher Education. 

Nelson, Chris A. 

  • Journal Article, Academic Journal 
    • Garcia-Olp, G., Nelson, C. A., Hinzo, A., & Young, D. A. (2020). Indigenous epistemologies: Implementing indigenous practices and perceptions to the area of STEM. Curriculum and Teaching Dialogue, 22(1-2), 197-215. 
    • Nelson, C. A. (2021). Unapologetically indigenous: Understanding the (colonial) doctoral process through self-reflexivity. Geneology, 5, 7. 
  • Technical Report 
    • Nelson, C. A., Jordan, S., & Thomas Pitts, R. (2020). Native language revitalization grantee narratives. Native language revitalization grant-making in New Mexico. Battle Creek, MI: W. K. Kellogg Foundation. 
    • Nelson, C. A., Tachine, A. R., & Lopez, J. D. (2021). Recognize it’s our land and honor the treaties. In Changing the narrative on student borrowers of color (pp. 16-22). Indianapolis, IN: Lumina Foundation. 
    • Thomas Pitts, R., Nelson, C. A., & Jordan, S. (2020). Methodology, references, and appendices. Native language revitalization grant-making in New Mexico. Battle Creek, MI: W. K. Kellogg Foundation. 
    • Thomas Pitts, R., Nelson, C. A., Gorman, B., & Poblete, M. (2020). Strategic success indicator (SSI) analysis & exemplar knowledge products (KPs). Native language revitalization grant-making in New Mexico. Battle Creek, MI: W. K. Kellogg Foundation.  

Nguyen, Mike Hoa T. 

  • Amicus Brief 
    • Poon, O., Garces, L., Wong, J., & Nguyen, M. H. T. (2020). Brief for 678 social scientists and scholars on college access, Asian American studies, and race as amici curiae supporting defendant-appellee. SFFA, Inc. v. President and Fellows of Harvard College, No. 19-2005. 
  • Book Chapter 
    • Chan, J., Nguyen, M. H., Thaviseth, L., & Chang, M. (2021). Forced migration and forged memories: Acts of remembrance and identity development among Southeast Asian American college students. In F. A. Bonner II, R. M. Banda, S. L. Smith, & a. f. marble (Eds.), Square pegs and round holes: Alternative approaches to diverse college student development theory (pp. 114-125). Sterling, VA: Stylus. 
  • Journal Article, Academic Journal 
    • Nguyen, M. H. T. (2020). Asian American and Native American Pacific Islander serving institutions (AANAPISIs): Serving and advocating for the educational needs of Southeast Asian American students. Journal of Southeast Asian American Education and Advancement, 15(2), 1-12. 
    • Nguyen, M. H., Chang, C. Y., Kim, V., Gutierrez, R. A. E., Le, A., Dumas, D. G., & Teranishi, R. T. (2020). Asian Americans, admissions, and college choice: An empirical test of claims of harm used in federal investigations. Educational Researcher, 49(8), 579-594. 
    • Nguyen, M. H. T., Espinoza, K. J., Gogue, D., & Dinh, D. T.-L. (2021). AANAPISIs in context  and practice: Strategies for serving Asian Pacific Islander Desi American students. About Campus, 26(1), 5-9. 
  • Research Report 
    • Nguyen, M. H. T., Espinoza, K. J., Gogue, D., & Dinh, D. (2020). Looking to the next  decade: Strengthening Asian American and Native American Pacific Islander serving institutions through policy and practice. Washington, DC: National Council of Asian Pacific Americans. 

Orphan, Cecilia M. 

  • Brief 
    • Tandberg, D. A., Orphan, C. M., & Fryar, A. H. (2021). Stimulating regional economic development through public universities. Boulder, CO: State Higher Education Executive Officers Association and Alliance for Research on Regional Colleges. 
  • Journal Article, Academic Journal 
    • Diaz Solodukhin, L., & Orphan, C. M. (2020). Operationalizing funds of knowledge: Examining a reciprocal research relationship between a White faculty member and a Latino student. Journal of Diversity in Higher Education. 
    • Orphan, C. M. (2020). Not all regional public universities strive for prestige: Examining and strengthening mission-centeredness within a vital sector. New Directions for Higher Education, 2020(190), 9-24. 
    • Orphan, C. M., & Broom, S. (2021). Life at the ‘people’s universities’: Organizational identification and commitment among regional comprehensive university faculty members in the USA. Higher Education. 
    • Orphan, C. M., Laderman, S., & Gildersleeve, R. E. (2021). Advocates or honest information brokers? Examining the higher education public policy agenda setting processes of intermediary organizations. Review of Higher Education, 44(3), 325-355. 
  • Newspaper 
    • McClure, K., Orphan, C. M., Fryar, H., & Koricich, A. (2021). Regional public universities don’t need rescuing. (13th ed., vol. 67, pp. 36). The Chronicle of Higher Education, February 21. 
  • Research Report 
    • McClure, K. R., Orphan, C. M., Fryar, A. H., & Koricich, A. (2021). Strengthening rural anchor institutions: Federal policy solutions for rural public colleges and the communities they serve. Alliance for Research on Regional Colleges. 
    • Orphan, C. M. (2020). Why regional public universities are vulnerable during recessions and must be protected. Washington, DC: Third Way. 

Sponsler, Laura E. 

Tyson, Michele 

  • Journal Article, Academic Journal 
    • Tyson, M. A. (2020). Perspectives of adult undergraduate women working towards a degree. Journal of Adult and Continuing Education. 

Research Methods and Information Science

Acadia, Spencer 

  • Book 
    • Acadia, S., & Fjellestad, M. T. (Eds.) (2020). Library and information studies for Arctic social sciences and humanities. New York: Routledge. 
  • Book Chapter 
    • Acadia, S., & Fjellestad, M. T. (2020). Introduction: Why this book and why the Arctic? In S. Acadia & M. T. Fjellestad (Eds.), Library and information studies for Arctic social sciences and humanities (pp. 1-65). New York: Routledge. 

Cutforth, Nick J. 

  • Journal Article, Academic Journal
    • Belansky, E. S., Lohmiller, K., Ingman, B. C., Cutforth, N., Scarbro, S., & Borley, L. (2020). Creating healthy schools with middle school students as change makers. Health Behavior and Policy Review, 7(3), 260-270.
    • Smith, N., Belansky, E. S., & Cutforth, N. J. (2020). The Southeast Colorado PE academy: Implementation and outcomes in rural elementary schools, 2014-16. Advances in Physical Education, 10(4), 436-458. 
  • Journal Article, Professional Journal 
    • Wright, P., Fuerniss, K., & Cutforth, N. J. (2020). Don Hellison’s scholarship reconsidered. Journal of Teaching Physical Education, 39(3), 311-320. 

Dali, Keren 

  • Book 
    • Dali, K., & Caidi, N. (Eds.). (2021). Humanizing LIS education and practice: Diversity by design. New York: Routledge.  
  • Book Chapter 
    • Dali, K., & Caidi, N. (2020). Introduction: Looking beyond the “us versus them” and retrofitting. In K. Dali & N. Caidi (Eds.), Humanizing LIS education and practice: Diversity by design (pp. 1-10). New York: Routledge. 
  • Journal Article, Academic Journal 
    • Dali, K. (2021). Fostering the reading experience for Spanish-speaking readers: Post-migration changes in reading practices and the implication for libraries. The Reference Librarian62(1), 34-58. 
    • Dali, K. (2021). The image of the library through the eyes of immigrant and migrant readers. Journal of Documentation. 
    • Dali, K. (2021). Reading practices of Spanish-speaking readers in the United States and Canada. Journal of Librarianship and Information Science. 
    • Dali, K. (2021). Ruminations on peer review in the time of social change. Journal of Documentation. 
    • Dali, K., & Brochu, L. The right to listen: A not so simple matter of audiobooks. American Library Association, 64(3), 109-116. 
    • Dali, K., Vannier, C., & Douglass, L. (2021). Reading experience librarianship: Working with readers in the 21st century. Journal of Documentation, 77(1), 259-283. 

Dumas, Denis G. 

  • Book Chapter 
    • Dumas, D. G. (2020). Logic and reasoning. In M. A. Runco & S. R. Pritzker (Eds.), Encyclopedia of creativity (pp. 45-49). Amsterdam: Academic Press. 
    • Dumas, D. G. (2020). Processing within and across domains of learning. In D. L. Dinsmore, L. K. Fryer, & M. M. Parkinson (Eds.), Handbook of strategies and strategic processing. New York: Routledge. 
  • Journal Article, Academic Journal 
    • Coleman, J. J., Dong, Y., Dumas, D. G., Owen, J., & Kopta, M. (2020). Longitudinal measurement invariance of the Behavioral Health Measure in a clinical sample. Journal of Counseling Psychology. 
    • Dong, Y., Clements, D. H., Sarama, J., Dumas, D. G., Banse, H. W., & Day-Hess, C. A. (2020). Mathematics and executive function competencies in the context of interventions: A quantile regression analysis. Journal of Experimental Education. 
    • Dong, Y., & Dumas, D. G. (2020). Are personality measures valid for different populations? A systematic review of measurement invariance across cultures, gender, and age. Personality and Individual Differences, 160, 109956. 
    • Dumas, D. G., Organisciak, P., & Doherty, M. (2020). Measuring divergent thinking originality with human raters and text-mining models: A psychometric comparison of methods. Psychology of Aesthetics, Creativity, and the Arts. 
    • Dumas, D. G., McNeish, D., & Greene, J. A. (2020). Dynamic measurement: A theoretical-psychometric paradigm for modern educational psychology. Educational Psychologist, 55(2), 88-105. 
    • Dumas, D. G., Organisciak, P., Maio, S., & Doherty, M. (2020). Four text-mining methods for measuring elaboration. Journal of Creative Behavior. 
    • Forthmann, B., Leveling, M., Dong, Y., & Dumas, D. G. (2020). Investigating the quantity-quality relationship in scientific creativity: An empirical examination of expected residual variance and the tilted funnel hypothesis. Scientometrics, 124, 2497-2518. 
    • Forthmann, B., Paek, S. H., Dumas, D. G., Barbot, B., & Holling, H. (2020). Scrutinizing the basis of originality in divergent thinking tests: On the measurement precision of response propensity estimates. British Journal of Educational Psychology, 90(3), 683-699. 
    • Forthmann, B., Szardenings, C., & Dumas, D. G. (2020). On the conceptual overlap between the fluency contamination effect in divergent thinking scores and the chance view on scientific creativity. Journal of Creative Behavior, 55(1), 268-275. 
    • Jablansky, S., Alexander, P., Dumas, D. G., & Compton, V. (2020). The development of relational reasoning in primary and secondary school students: A longitudinal investigation in technology education. International Journal of Technology and Design Education, 30, 973-993. 
    • Nguyen, M. H., Chang, C. Y., Kim, V., Gutierrez, R. A. E., Le, A., Dumas, D. G., & Teranishi, R. T. (2020). Asian Americans, admissions, and college choice: An empirical test of claims of harm used in federal investigations. Educational Researcher, 49(8), 579-594. 

Matusiak, Krystyna 

  • Book Review 
    • Matusiak, K. (2020). Machine translation and global research: Towards improved machine translation literacy in the scholarly community, by Lynne Bowker and Jairo B. Ciro. Journal of the Association for Information Science and Technology, 71(10), 1275-1278. 
  • Conference Proceeding 
    • Matusiak, K., & Werling, S. (2020). Implementing standardized rights statements in a digitized community archive. Proceedings of the Association for Information Science and Technology57(1). 
  • Journal Article, Academic Journal 
    • Matusiak, K. (2020). Studying visual literacy: Research methods and the use of visual evidence. IFLA Journal, 46(2), 172-181. 
    • Matusiak, K. K., & Bright, K. (2020). Teaching research methods in master’s-level LIS programs: The United States perspective. Journal of Education for Library and Information Science, 61(3), 357-382. 
    • Xie, I., Joo, S., & Matusiak, K. K. (2021). Digital library evaluation measures in academic settings: Perspectives from scholars and practitioners. Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, 53(1), 130-152. 

Organisciak, Peter 

  • Conference Proceeding 
    • Weber, N., Fenlon, K., Organisciak, P., Thomer, A., & Wickett, K. (2020). Workshop on conceptual models in digital libraries, archives, and museums. 2020 ACM/IEEE joint conference on digital libraries. Champaign, IL: IEEE. 
  • Journal Article, Academic Journal 
    • Dumas, D. G., Organisciak, P., & Doherty, M. (2020). Measuring divergent thinking originality with human raters and text-mining models: A psychometric comparison of methods. Psychology of Aesthetics, Creativity, and the Arts. 
    • Dumas, D. G., Organisciak, P., Maio, S., & Doherty, M. (2020). Four text-mining methods for measuring elaboration. Journal of Creative Behavior. 
  • Research Report 
    • Weber, N., Thomer, A. K., Fenlon, K., & Organisciak, P. (2020). SIG-CM 2019: Workshop on conceptual modeling report. Zenodo, June 5. 

Thomas Pitts, Robyn 

  • Journal Article, Academic Journal 
    • Thomas Pitts, R. (2021). Pinpointing where to start: A reflective analysis on the introductory evaluation course. Canadian Journal of Program Evaluation, 35(3), 437-449. 
    • Thomas Pitts, R. (2020). Finding common ground: Centralizing responsiveness within a multisite initiative. Evaluation Journal of Australasia, 20(2), 95-102. 
    • Van Ooyik, J. M., Lerner, J., & Pitts, R. L. T. (2021). The development of preservice teaching competencies. Educational Research: Theory and Practice, 32(1), 8-12. 
  • Proceedings  
    • Pitts, R. T., & Chouinard, J. A. (2020). Experiential learning: How novice evaluators apply their studies in fieldwork. In J. LaVelle & A. Gullickson (Eds.), Proceedings of the Working Conference to Chart the Future of Evaluation Education and Training.  Melbourne: International Society for Evaluation Education.  
  • Technical Report 
    • Nelson, C. A., Jordan, S., & Thomas Pitts, R. (2020). Native language revitalization grantee narratives. Native language revitalization grant-making in New Mexico. Battle Creek, MI: W. K. Kellogg Foundation. 
    • Thomas Pitts, R., Nelson, C. A., Gorman, B., & Poblete, M. (2020). Strategic success indicator (SSI) analysis & exemplar knowledge products (KPs). Native language revitalization grant-making in New Mexico. Battle Creek, MI: W. K. Kellogg Foundation. 
    • Thomas Pitts, R., Nelson, C. A., & Jordan, S. (2020). Methodology, references, and appendices. Native language revitalization Grant-making in New Mexico. Battle Creek, MI: W. K. Kellogg Foundation. 

Zhang, Duan 

  • Book chapter 
    • Franko, M., & Zhang, D. (2020). “Aligning Learning Preschool and Kindergarten Classroom  
    • Experiences: Effects on Children’s School Readiness, in Vorkapić, S. T., & LoCasale-Crouch, J. (Eds.), Supporting Children’s Well-Being During Early Childhood Transition to School (pp. 60-84). IGI Global.   DOI: http://doi.org/10.4018/978-1-7998-4435-8  
  • Journal Article, Academic Journal  
    • Snider, L. A., Talapatra, D., Miller, G. E., & Zhang, D. (2020). Expanding best practices in assessment for students with intellectual and developmental disabilities. Contemporary School Psychology, 24, 429-444.  

Teaching and Learning Sciences

Banerjee, Rashida 

  • Academic/Professional Blog Contributor 
  • Book Chapter 
    • McLean, M., Banerjee, R., Squires, J., & Hebbeler, K. (2020). Assessment: Introduction and overview. In M. McLean, R. Banerjee, J. Squires, & K. Hebbeler (Eds.), Assessment: Recommended practices for young children and families. Dallas, TX: Division for Early Childhood of the Council for Exceptional Children. 
  • Journal Article, Academic Journal 
    • Movahedazarhouligh, S., Banerjee, R., & Luckner, J. L. (2021). Leadership practices in early childhood and early childhood special education: A mixed methods study. Early Education and Development. https://doi.org/10.1080/10409289.2021.1909937 
    • Banerjee, R., Horn, E., Palmer, S. (2020). Morning or afternoon: Does it make a difference in preschool programs? Journal of Research in Childhood Education, 34(3), 447-462. https://doi.org/10.1080/02568543.2019.1705942 
    • Luckner, J. L., Banerjee, R., Movahedazarhouligh, S., & Millen, K. (2020). A systematic review of replicative self-determination intervention studies. Journal of Special Education, 54(1) 29-39.  Doi: https://doi.org/10.1177/0022466919850188 
  • Book: 
    • McLean, M., Banerjee, R., Squires, J., & Hebbeler, K. (Eds.) (2020). Assessment: Recommended Practices for Young Children and Families. Division for Early Childhood- Council for Exceptional Children.  

Garner, Brette 

  • Conference Proceeding 
    • Ehrenfeld, N., Horn, I. S., Moses, J., & Garner, B. (2020). Teacher groupwork monitoring routines and the nature of students’ conversation in small groups. In M. Gresalfi & I. S. Horn (Eds.), The interdisciplinarity of the learning sciences. International Society of the Learning Sciences (ISLS). 
    • Ehrenfeld, N., Schneeberger McGugan, K., Marshall, S. A., & Garner, B. (2020). Reconciling local contexts and external conceptual resources in mathematics teachers’ collaborative sensemaking. In A. I. Sacristán, J. C. Cortés-Zavala, & P. M. Ruiz-Arias (Eds.), Mathematics Education Across Cultures: Proceedings of the 42nd Meeting of the North American Chapter of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education. International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education. 
    • Shapiro, B. R., Garner, B., Chae, H. S., & Natriello, G. (2020). Classroom interaction geography: A case study. In M. Gresalfi & I. S. Horn (Eds.), The interdisciplinarity of the learning sciences. International Society of the Learning Sciences (ISLS).  

Hazel, Cynthia E. 

  • Book Chapter 
    • Hess, R., & Hazel, C. E. (2021). School programs that prevent school failure and school dropout. In Fostering the emotional well-being of our youth: A school-based approach (pp. 395-412). Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press. 
  • Journal Article, Academic Journal 
    • Newman, D. S., Hazel, C. E., Faler, A., & Pomerantz, L. (2021). Supervision training in APA accredited school psychology doctoral programs: An analysis of syllabi. Training and Education in Professional Psychology.  

Miller, Gloria E. 

  • Journal Article, Academic Journal 
    • Bold, E. C., Hodges, A., & Miller, G. E. (2020). Building relationships with families from underrepresented communities during the special education process. The School Psychologist, 74(3), 3-13. 
    • Pollard-Durodola, S. D., & Miller, G. E. (2020). Student interns and their field supervisors’ perceptions of a school psychology training program to support emergent bilinguals. International Journal of School & Educational Psychology.1-16. https://doi.org/10.1080/21683603.2020.1772160 
    • Snider, L. A., Talapatra, D., Miller, G. E., & Zhang, D. (2020). Expanding best practices in assessment for students with intellectual and developmental disabilities. Contemporary School Psychology, 24, 429-444.  
  • Book Chapters 
    • Miller, G. E. & Colebrook, J. (2020). Chapter 35: The Promotion of Family Support. In B. K. Nastasi, S. N. Hart, & S. Naser (Eds.) The International Handbook on Child Rights and School Psychology (pp. 361-375), NY, NY: Springer Publishing.    
    • Miller, G. E., & Hanh Nag (2020).  Home-School-Community Collaboration. In Hass, M., Nguyen T. M., & Dang H. M. (Eds.). (2020). Introduction to School Psychology in Vietnam. (pp. 84-99). Hanoi, Vietnam: Vietnam National University Press.   

Rausch, Alissa L. 

  • Journal Article, Academic Journal 
    • Rausch, A. L., Joseph, J. D., & Steed, E. (2020). Dis/ability critical race studies (DisCrit) for inclusion in early care and education: Ethical considerations of implicit and explicit bias. Zero to Three. 
  • Journal Article, Professional Journal 
    • Rausch, A. L., Bold, E., & Strain, P. S. (2020). The more the merrier: Using collaborative transdisciplinary services to maximize inclusion and child outcomes. Young Exceptional Children.  

Roberts, Garrett J. 

  • Journal Article, Academic Journal 
    • Garwood, J. D., McKenna, J. W., Roberts, G. J., Ciullo, S., & Shin, M. (2021). Social studies content knowledge interventions for students with emotional and behavioral disorders: A meta-analysis. Behavior Modification, 45(1), 147-176.  
    • Roberts, G. J., Vaughn, S., Roberts, G., & Miciak, J. (2021). Problem behaviors and response to reading intervention for upper elementary students with reading difficulties. Remedial and Special Education, 42(3), 169-181.   

Talapatra, Devadrita 

  • Journal Article, Academic Journal 
    • Talapatra, D. & Snider, L. (2021). Leveraging policies for college and career planning for students with intellectual disabilities. Contemporary School Psychology. https://doi.org/10.1007/s40688-020-00347-0 
    • Snider, L. A., Talapatra, D., Miller, G. E., & Zhang, D. (2020). Expanding best practices in assessment for students with intellectual and developmental disabilities. Contemporary School Psychology, 24, 429-444.   
    • Talapatra, D. & Parris, L. (2020). Introducing School Psychology Training and Pedagogy: Creating a Foundation for Advancing Training and Expanding Our Reach. School Psychology Training and Pedagogy, 37 (3), 1-4.  
  • Journal Article, Professional Journal 
  • Book Chapters 
    • Talapatra, D., Parris, L., & Roach, A. (2020). Teaching with passion and effectiveness. In Floyd, R. & Eckhart, T. (Eds.) Handbook of University and Professional Careers in School Psychology. Routledge: New York, NY. ISBN 9780367353681 
  • Technical Reports and National Guidelines  
    • Trainers of School Psychologists. (2021). School Psychology Unified Call for Deeper Understanding, Solidarity, and Action to Eradicate Anti-AAAPI Racism and Violence [PositionStatement]. https://tsp.wildapricot.org/resources/Documents/Final%20Unified%20Statement_4_30_21.pdf   
    • National Association of School Psychologists. (2020). Report of the NASP Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion Implementation Task Force [Taskforce report]. Bethesda, MD: Author  
  • Conference Proceedings 
    • Snider, L. A., Talapatra, D., & Parris, L. (2021). Conceptualizing and supporting grieving students with intellectual disability. Practitioner conversation presented at the National Association of School Psychologists 2021 Annual Convention, Virtual. 
    • Talley, J., & Talapatra, D. (2021). Map to the stars: Transition planning with family-school partnerships. [Practitioner Conversation]. National Association of School Psychologists 2021 Annual Convention, Virtual.*  
    • Talapatra, D., Talley, J., & McCredie, K. (2021). Criminals or victims: How students with intellectual disabilities become incarcerated. [Practitioner Conversation]. National Association of School Psychologists 2021 Annual Convention, Virtual.* 
    • Talapatra, D. & Parris, L. (2021). School Psychology Training and Pedagogy: Q&A with the Editors. [Presentation]. Trainers of School Psychologists: Virtual. 
    • White, L. C., Snider, L. A., Talley, J. M., & Talapatra, D. (2021). Building school psychologists’ awareness and prioritization of sexual health curriculum for students with intellectual disability. [Poster]. Trainers of School Psychologists: Virtual. 

Delaney, Mary Kay 

  • Book 
    • Delaney, M. K., & Mayer, S. J. (Eds.) (2021). In search of wonderful ideas: Critical exploration in teacher education. New York: Teachers College Press. 
  • Book Chapter 
    • Delaney, M. K., & Mayer, S. J. (2021). Pedagogy as counternarrative. In M. K. Delaney & S. J. Mayer (Eds.), In search of wonderful ideas: Critical exploration in teacher education (pp. 14-23). New York: Teachers College Press. 
    • Delaney, M. K. (2021). Awakening to teaching: Critical explorations, imagination, and equity. In M. K. Delaney & S. J. Mayer (Eds.), In search of wonderful ideas: Critical exploration in teacher education (pp. 39-57). New York: Teachers College Press. 
    • Delaney, M. K., & Mayer, S. J. (2021). Introduction. In M. K. Delaney & S. J. Mayer (Eds.), In search of wonderful ideas: Critical exploration in teacher education (pp. 1-8). New York: Teachers College Press. 
  • Editor, Journal Editor 
    • Delany, M. K., Generett, G. G., Price, P. G., & Rayle, J. (Eds.) (2020). Professing Education: Special Issue—9th International Conference on Education and Social Justice. Professing Education: A Journal of the Society of Professors of Education, 19(1). 
    • Delany, M. K., Generett, G. G., Price, P. G., & Rayle, J. (Eds.) (2020). Professing Education: Theme Issue—Courage and TeachingProfessing Education: A journal of the Society of Professors of Education, 18(1-2). 

Hafenstein, Norma L. 

  • Monograph 
    • Hafenstein, Norma L. (2021). Perspectives in gifted education: Influences and impacts of the education doctorate on gifted education II. Denver, CO: Institute for the Development of Gifted Education, Ricks Center for Gifted Children, University of Denver. 
  • Conference Proceedings 
    • Hafenstein, N. L. (2020, January). Celebrating Gifted Education: Reflecting on our past- Impacting our future. Policy Symposium Panelist. Office of the Daniel L. Ritchie Endowed Chair in Gifted Education, Policy Symposium. Morgridge College of Education, University of Denver, Denver, CO. 
    • Hafenstein, N. L., Arnstein, K., Coggin, K., Faulkner, M., Norberto-Whipple, M., Soto-Harrison, M., & Peralta, S. (2020, October). Diverse gifted learners: Strategies for practice from cutting edge research. Colorado Association for the Gifted and Talented (CAGT) 2020 Annual Convention, virtual delivery.  
    • Hafenstein, N. L. (Session Chair). Adams, A., & Ovalle, R. Making lemonade out of COVID-19 lemons: Helping EdD students complete a DiP during a global pandemic [Presentation]. The Carnegie Project on the Education Doctorate (CPED) 2020 October Convening, virtual delivery. 
    • Hafenstein, N. L., Michalec, P., Reinert, L., Schmidt, K. (2020, October). DIP as professional pathway: Scholarly Practitioners as Leaders/Change Agents. The Carnegie Project on the Education Doctorate (CPED) 2020 October Convening, virtual delivery. 
    • Hafenstein, N. L. (Conference Host). (2021, February). 2021 Gifted education policy symposium and conference: Addressing disproportionality in gifted education [Conference]. Office of the Daniel L. Ritchie Endowed Chair in Gifted Education, University of Denver, Virtual. 
    • Reinert, L., McGagin, B., Amiri, F., Lin, J., Hafenstein, N. L., Hesbol, K., Reichardt, R., & DeCesare, D. (2021, February). Initial descriptions, understanding, and design of I-REECCH [Poster]. 2021 Gifted Education Policy Symposium and Conference, Office of the Daniel L. Ritchie Endowed Chair in Gifted Education, University of Denver, Virtual. 
    • Hafenstein, N. L., Hesbol, K., Reinert, L., Lin, J., & Amiri, F. (2021, March). Impacting Rural Education through Expanding Culturally responsive curriculum, computer science training and Higher order thinking skill development (I-REECCH) [Presentation]. 26th National Congress on Rural Education in Canada, Virtual. 

Lerner, Jessica 

  • Journal Article, Academic Journal 
    • Van Ooyik, J. M., Lerner, J., & Pitts, R. L. T. (2021). The development of preservice teaching competencies. Educational Research: Theory and Practice, 32(1), 8-12. 
    • Lerner, J., Roberts, G. J., Green, K., & Coleman, J. (2021). Prioritizing competencies for beginning teachers in high-poverty schools: A Delphi study. Educational Research: Theory and Practice, 32(2), 17-46. 

Michalec, Paul 

  • Academic/Professional Blog Contributor  
  • Journal Article, Academic Journal  
    • Michalec, P. (2020). Disrupting the disimagination machine: Reflections on courage in the classroom. Professing Education: Theme Issue—Courage and TeachingProfessing Education: A journal of the Society of Professors of Education, 18(-2), 39-50. 
    • Michalec, P., & Wilson, J. L. (2021). Truth hidden in plain sight: How social-emotional learning empowers novice teachers’ culturally responsive pedagogy in Title I schools. Journal of Education. 
  • Newsletter 
    • Michalec, P. (2020). Lighthouse. 

McDiarmid, Amy 

  • Journal Article, Academic Journal 
    • McDiarmid, A. & Brown, K. (March, 2020). A Collaborative Training Model to Address Substance Use and Addictions in Schools. Communique. National Association of School Psychologists.   

Allen, Korrie 

  • Book Chapter 
    • Allen, K. & Milito, V. (2020). RE-CBT in the Treatment of Autism Spectrum Disorder.   
    • In M. Bernard & M. Terjsen (Eds.), Rational-Emotive and Cognitive-Behavioral Approaches to Child and Adolescent Mental Health: Theory, Practice, Research, Applications. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-53901-6_1

Marsico Institute for Early Learning and Literacy

Clements, Doug H. 

  • Academic/Professional Blog Contributor 
  • Book 
    • Clements, D. H., & Sarama, J. (2021). Learning and teaching early math: The learning trajectories approach, 3rd ed. New York: Routledge. 
  • Book Chapter 
    • Clements, D. H., & Sarama, J. (2020). Promoting a good start: Technology in early childhood mathematics. In E. Arias, J. Cristia, & S. Cueto (Eds.), Learning mathematics in the 21st Century: Adding technology to the equation (pp. 181-223). Washington, DC: Inter-American Development Bank. 
  • Journal Article, Academic Journal 
    • Clements, D. H., Banse, H. W., Sarama, J., Tatsuoka, C., Joswick, C., Hudyma, A., . . . & Tatsuoka, K. K. (2020). Young children’s actions on length measurement tasks: Strategies and cognitive attributes. Mathematical Thinking and Learning. 
    • Clements, D. H., Sarama, J., Baroody, A. J., & Joswick, C. (2020). Efficacy of a learning trajectory approach compared to a teach-to-target approach for addition and subtraction. ZDM – Mathematics Education, 52(4), 637-648. 
    • Clements, D. H., Sarama, J., Layzer, C., Unlu, F., & Fesler, L. (2020). Effects on mathematics and executive function of a mathematics and play intervention versus mathematics alone. Journal for Research in Mathematics Education, 51(3), 301-333. 
    • Clements, D. H., Vinh, M., Lim, C.-I., & Sarama, J. (2020). STEM for inclusive excellence and equity. Early Education and Development. 
    • Dong, Y., Clements, D. H., Sarama, J., Dumas, D. G., Banse, H. W., & Day-Hess, C. A. (2020). Mathematics and executive function competencies in the context of interventions: A quantile regression analysis. Journal of Experimental Education. 
    • Wan, S., Bond, T. N., Lang, K., Clements, D. H., Sarama, J., & Bailey, D. H. (2021). Is intervention fadeout a scaling artefact? Economics of Education Review, 82, 102090. 
  • Journal Article, Professional Journal 
    • Clements, D. H., Sarama, J., Brenneman, K., Duke, N. K., & Hemmeter, M. L. (2020). STREAM education at work—no, at play! A toy-making unit. YC Young Children, 75(2), 36-43. 
  • Podcast 
    • Clements, D. H. (2020). Episode #103: Learning and teaching early math: An interview with Dr. Doug Clements. Making Math Moments That Matter, November 16. https://makemathmoments.com/episode103. 

Day-Hess, Crystal A. 

  • Academic/Professional Blog Contributor 
  • Journal Article, Academic Journal 
    • Dong, Y., Clements, D. H., Sarama, J., Dumas, D. G., Banse, H. W., & Day-Hess, C. A. (2020). Mathematics and executive function competencies in the context of interventions: A quantile regression analysis. Journal of Experimental Education. 

Sarama, Julie 

  • Academic/Professional Blog Contributor 
  • Book 
    • Clements, D. H., & Sarama, J. (2021). Learning and teaching early math: The learning trajectories approach, 3rd ed. New York: Routledge. 
  • Book Chapter 
    • Clements, D. H., & Sarama, J. (2020). Promoting a good start: Technology in early childhood mathematics. In E. Arias, J. Cristia, & S. Cueto (Eds.), Learning mathematics in the 21st Century: Adding technology to the equation (pp. 181-223). Washington, DC: Inter-American Development Bank. 
  • Journal Article, Academic Journal 
    • Clements, D. H., Banse, H. W., Sarama, J., Tatsuoka, C., Joswick, C., Hudyma, A., . . . & Tatsuoka, K. K. (2020). Young children’s actions on length measurement tasks: Strategies and cognitive attributes. Mathematical Thinking and Learning. 
    • Clements, D. H., Sarama, J., Baroody, A. J., & Joswick, C. (2020). Efficacy of a learning trajectory approach compared to a teach-to-target approach for addition and subtraction. ZDM – Mathematics Education, 52(4), 637–648. 
    • Clements, D. H., Sarama, J., Layzer, C., Unlu, F., & Fesler, L. (2020). Effects on mathematics and executive function of a mathematics and play intervention versus mathematics alone. Journal for Research in Mathematics Education, 51(3), 301-333. 
    • Clements, D. H., Vinh, M., Lim, C.-I., & Sarama, J. (2020). STEM for inclusive excellence and equity. Early Education and Development. 
    • Dong, Y., Clements, D. H., Sarama, J., Dumas, D. G., Banse, H. W., & Day-Hess, C. A. (2020). Mathematics and executive function competencies in the context of interventions: A quantile regression analysis. Journal of Experimental Education. 
    • Wan, S., Bond, T. N., Lang, K., Clements, D. H., Sarama, J., & Bailey, D. H. (2021). Is intervention fadeout a scaling artefact? Economics of Education Review, 82, 102090. 
  • Journal Article, Professional Journal 
    • Clements, D. H., Sarama, J., Brenneman, K., Duke, N. K., & Hemmeter, M. L. (2020). STREAM education at work—no, at play! A toy-making unit. YC Young Children, 75(2), 36-43. 

Positive Early Learning Experiences (PELE)

Strain, Phillip S.  

  • Journal Article, Professional Journal 
    • Rausch, A. L., Bold, E., & Strain, P. S. (2020). The more the merrier: Using collaborative transdisciplinary services to maximize inclusion and child outcomes. Young Exceptional Children. 

Center for Rural School Health and Education (CRSHE)

Belansky, Elaine S. 

  • Journal Article, Academic Journal 
    • Belansky, E. S., Lohmiller, K., Ingman, B. C., N., Scarboro, S., & Borley, L. (2020). Creating healthy schools with middle school students as change makers. Health Behavior & Policy Review, 7(3), 260-270. 
    • Smith, N., Belansky, E. S., & Cutforth, N. J. (2020). The Southeast Colorado PE academy: Implementation and outcomes in rural elementary schools, 2014-16. Advances in Physical Education, 10(4), 436-458.   

Ingman, Benjamin C. 

  • Journal Article, Academic Journal 
    • Belansky, E. S., Lohmiller, K., Ingman, B. C., N., Scarboro, S., & Borley, L. (2020). Creating healthy schools with middle school students as change makers. Health Behavior & Policy Review, 7(3), 260-270. 
    • McMullen, J. M., George, M., Ingman, B. C., Pulling Kuhn, A., Graham, D. J., & Carson, R. L. (2020). A systematic review of community engagement outcomes research in school-based health interventions. Journal of School Health, 90(12), 985-994. 
  • Technical Report 
    • Ingman, B. C., Belansky, E. S., & Loecke, C. J. (2020). Make it happen annual report. 
    • Ingman, B. C., Loecke, C., & Belansky, E. S. (2020). Working to improve school health II final report. 

Graduation Regalia

Gowns & Robes

The academic gown is usually black and is worn at all levels of education. It is to be worn closed and zipped. The robe is often ankle- or mid-calf length.The Bachelor’s gown is the most simple; the Master’s gown typically has longer, oblong sleeves; and theDoctoral gown is more elaborate, made of velvet, and has three stripes on the bell-shaped sleeves that indicate the school/area of study.

Hoods

Hoods are conferred upon students when they graduate with a Master’s or Doctoral degree. They are made of the same material as the gown. The hood is3.5′ long (Master’s) or 4′ (Doctoral) and features a velvet trim that indicates the discipline of graduation.The lining of the hood indicates the colors of the college from where the student graduated.

Caps, Mortarboards & Tams

Caps and mortarboards also become more elaborate with more degrees. Bachelor’s and Master’s graduates have a flat cap with a tassel. The tassel starts on the right and graduates move it to the left once they receive their diploma (a good way to remember this is that they “left” their institution). A doctoral cap is known as a “tam” which is velvet; has four, six, or eight corners; and is floppier than the traditional cap.

Colors

The colors of hoods symbolize the department/discipline of graduation. Here are some common ones you might see:

  • Light blue – education, counseling
  • Citron (yellow) – social work
  • Dark blue – all Ph.D.
  • Purple – law
  • White – history, sociology
  • Gold – psychology
  • Crimson (dark red) – communication
  • Lemon – library science

Accessories

Graduates might wear other items with their graduation regalia, such as stoles, cords, medals, and medallions.

  • Academic stoles, which look like thinner, satin hoods, are decorative in nature and typically indicate membership in clubs and organizations.
  • Cords, or braided rope, are often worn to show academic achievement (e.g. summa cum laude).
  • Medals and medallions are bestowed upon faculty or students for important titles or positions (e.g. Chancellor,President, Valedictorian).

History

The history of the academic regalia we see today dates back to the 12th and13th centuries when colleges and universities in western Europe were first being founded. It was the traditional dress of the clergy and monks at the time who often conducted business in cold, unheated churches. Gowns were worn to keep warm and hoods, or skull caps, were used to cover shaved heads. Caps and gowns were seen as markers of privilege and distinguishment. The colors that we see today were implemented and standardized in the late 19th century in order to bring more uniformity to the ceremony following an increase in the number of college students.

#1Day4DU: Together, we can do more for children tomorrow

Published May 14, 2021

May 19, 2021 is #1Day4DU, the University’s annual day of giving. Community donations help to fuel innovative programs, research, and initiatives. Through a tax-deductible donation – or simply spreading the word – you can make a direct and meaningful impact for our students, faculty, and the communities they serve.

Our 2021 Project: Imagine Stronger Schools Next Year!

The COVID-19 pandemic has presented many challenges for students, educators, school leaders, and parents. While addressing the urgent issues of today, we must also plan now for the education system we need after COVID. In order to address the devastating effects of this crisis, schools must emerge stronger.

Students and faculty at the Morgridge College of Education are uniquely positioned to rise to this significant challenge. They are forward thinking and committed to driving positive change.

Among other issues, they are partnering with schools on mental health, school and family communication, and use of technology.

You can support our students as they evaluate the impacts of the adaptations made during this crisis, build on new opportunities, and dive deep to address challenges.

With your investment today, we can do more for children tomorrow. Together, we can plan for a brighter future!

The video above features Juanita Valdez, an MCE ELPS alum. If the video is not loading for you, please visit: Vimeo.

Historic Projects

In 2019, we partnered with the Brink Literacy Project to increase literacy rates and empower incarcerated women in the US prison system. Through our partnership, and with the support of our community, we were able  to enhance their curriculum, develop educator training, and help bring on new instructors. We are proud of our partnership and grateful to everyone who gave, shared, or engaged. To find out more about this project, please visit Brink Literacy Project: Frames Prison Program.

MCE Stands Against Violence & For Community

Published May 12, 2021

Dear MCE community,

Over the weekend, once again our Colorado community was impacted by a senseless act of gun violence. We are heartbroken to learn that a birthday party in Colorado Springs turned deadly when a man walked in and took the lives of six people, and then himself. 

Sadly, this was not the only shooting that took place over the weekend.Since Friday alone, there have been at least 10 acts of gun violence across the country, with a total of 194 mass shootings since the start of 2021 (NPR). With this widespread violence, there will undoubtedly be close connections to members of our MCE and DU communities. While we cannot adequately express our sorrow for all of these tragedies, MCE continues to fervently disavow violence and reaffirm the power of a community such as ours coming together during times like these. 

We recognize that any shooting can understandably create feelings and anxieties, and we will continue to offer support and care. For anyone who feels like talking, sharing, or reaching out for help, please consider the campus resources listed below. And as always, please reach out and support one another, as we have before, and as we will now.

In Support,

The Morgridge College of Education

 

If You Need Support

Please explore the Support Services available to members of the University of Denver community. These include crisis support, therapy, and more. Many other resources are available.

Crisis and Suicide Prevention Resources

  • The National Suicide Prevention Lifeline provides 24/7 free and confidential emotional support to people in suicidal crisis or emotional distress: 1-800-273-8255.
  • Colorado Crisis Services provides 24/7 free support. To get help, call 1-844-493-8255 or text “TALK” to 38255
  • The Crisis Text Line provides 24/7 free support in live chat, text,  and on Facebook. Text HOME to 741741 to connect with a Crisis Counselor.

May 3, 2021 – Why do you read? Do you read for content, pleasure, or obligation? Maybe reading isn’t your thing. I read a lot. It is part of my job. I read articles and books for general knowledge or as possible texts for the classes I teach. I read academic papers and dissertations. In many ways I read for a living. Regardless of what I’m reading I’m frequently on the lookout for words or phrases that speak to my inner-teacher. I’ve noticed over the years that more times than not, the best and most enduring wisdom comes from non-teaching sources. I’m particularly enthralled by the ways that poetry, that never mentions teaching, learning, books or assessments, offers insights that often escaped me in all the articles, books and dissertations I’ve read. There is a time and place for academic reading and writing. It is an important way of describing the world and seeing into the complexity of teaching and learning. But I increasingly find the teaching world is much bigger than all the pages on education I read.

The singer and songwriter, David Byrne, when asked about the meaning of music responded, “I wouldn’t be surprised if poetry—poetry in the broadest sense, in the sense of a world filled with metaphor, rhyme, and recurring patterns, shapes, and designs—is how the world works. The world isn’t logical, it’s a song.” Such wisdom, I think, for effective teaching. I sense that a similar truth lies deep within the memory of teaching and learning when released from the industrial, rational and systematized form it currently inhabits. To paraphrase Byrne, education isn’t logical, it is melody, rhythm; the melody of individual voices, uniquely engaged in the common pursuit of living more fully in the world. Education is a song, both literally and metaphorically. I love listening to the ways a class comes together over time; the song unfolds along with their learning, exploring and expanding notions of truth. Experiencing learning and teaching as music, poetry and rhyme invites for a wider range of dialects (language, thinking and seeing). This, I believe, creates more space for marginalized students and voices to emerge.

Another example of teaching wisdom from non-education sources occurred recently when I was reading, Braiding Sweetgrass, by Robin Wall Kimmerer. Her writing is an inviting blend of her Indigenous knowing, scientific training, natural history and story of lived experience. A melody and rhythm that often sounds like poetry to me because it is expansive and imaginative. Her book is her song of right living, always in the making. As I read, I find myself continuously invited to consider the ways I might teach anew. Kimmerer is a Professor of Environmental Biology, plants are her deep interest and passion. She argues that the green world is a gift to the human world, but a gift that is rarely fully appreciated by the Western-scientific mind: “Plant blindness and its relative, species loneliness, impedes the recognition of the green world as a garden of gifts. The cycle flows from attention, to gift, to gratitude, to reciprocity. It starts with seeing” (p. xii).

I often speak about teaching as a gift; a gift I offer my students as well as a gift I encourage my students to give away. The word gift flows out of mind and heart as water flows from a spring. But my understanding, as I reflect on Kimmerer’s words, is shallow and more instrumental than I would like to admit. In short, I sometimes teach from a place of “instructional blindness and its relative, student loneliness”. I haven’t fully grasped and internalized what it means to teach from a gift orientation instead of treating education as a commodity. Kimmerer’s description of gift as a “cycle [that] flows from attention, to gift, to gratitude, to reciprocity” is stunning and instructive for me. She is speaking of plants, but I hear words of wisdom for my teaching. At its best, education is a cycle with particular elements that blend and flow like a multi-vocal song. The word that grabs my attention is “reciprocity”. It raises all kinds of personal and instructional questions, questions that don’t require answers but rather questions to live into. To me, in the context of the cycle of gifting, answers feel like a dam that hinders or prevents the free flow of the gift. It creates a sort of blindness and transactional quality that limits the possibility for imagination and the unexpected.

Reciprocity is contingent on relationships. Certainly, the most obvious relationship is between teacher and learner. But the question is why? Why is that relationship the first place I go when there are other relationships to consider? For instance, external relationships with colleagues, text, or the social context of the world; and internal relationships with my calling, heart and soul. I suspect that the teacher/learner relationship rises to my attention because that is the relationship must evident in the literature; and it is most evident in the literature because it is most amenable to the questions of science. The outer dimensions of teaching are more susceptible to measurement than the internal relationships of self and the inner-life. The outer and technical are important but so too is the ineffable. Those mysterious elements of teaching that are always just on the edge of knowing, but not fully knowable. Kimmerer’s quote ends with the reminder/charge that the cycle, “starts with seeing”. Starting, not for the purpose of working toward the end of the cycle but seeing as continuous starting.

Which word in the gift cycle speaks to you? Where are your blind spots that foster a sense of loneliness for self and others in your teaching? Who or what can help you see into and beyond that loneliness, to invite you into instructional relationships that are life giving? What might it mean to envision the classroom as a “garden of gifts” waiting to offer wisdom of healing for you, your students and the world? Do you really see your students? Do they really see you? Where might you find wisdom on teaching in non-education sources?

2020-2021 COESA Award Nominations Open

In recognition of the outstanding contributions of MCE students, COESA is pleased to announce the call for nominations for the following 2020-2021 COESA Awards:

  • Changemaker Award: In recognition of a student’s implementation of breakthrough solutions to complex challenges using an intersystem approach within their field of study or our MCE community.
  • Community Partnership Award: In recognition of a student who has built partnerships within the community that promote an intersecting professional world.
  • Inclusive Excellence Award: In recognition of a student’s commitment to and enactment of the values of Inclusive Excellence in their field of study or our MCE community.
  • Leadership Award: In recognition of a student’s efforts to promote college-wide thinking & action through collegiality, leadership, and collaboration.
  • Practitioner Award: In recognition of a student’s application of research to their professional practice.
  • Research Impact Award: In recognition of a student’s research contributions to their field of study.
  • Service Impact Award: In recognition of a student’s collaborative impact in service to others within their field of study or our MCE community.

Nominations are due Monday, May 10th, 2021 at 11:59pm.

You can submit nominations here: https://udenver.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_ekyp1HGG20Bbe1o

All students, faculty, and staff are welcome to submit nominations. Award recipients will be notified by May 14th, 2021. The COESA Executive Board members are not eligible to be nominated for or receive COESA Awards.

If you have questions or concerns, please reach out to the COESA Executive Board at COESA@du.edu.

A Special Take on Special Education in Colorado 

What can the State of Colorado do to improve the educational experience for individuals with  differences? How can parents of children with special needs be empowered more effectively?  To find out answers to these and other questions, we sat down with Stephen Fusco.  

Stephen, who plans to graduate in June with his PhD in Educational Leadership and Policy Studies at Morgridge, was recently appointed to the Colorado Special Education Advisory Committee (CSEAC). The committee provides policy guidance to the State on issues relating to special education. CSEAC is mandated by both state and federal law. Representatives include parents of children with special needs, service providers, and other members of our community. As we started out conversation, Stephen voiced concerns that many in our community have expressed, saying that he was “surprised at how little attention children with special needs still receive,” especially in Colorado. This is one of the reasons why he wanted to participate in CSEAC. Representatives can not only participate in critical advocacy for children, but also inform important decision-making at the state level. 

Our Interview 

Let’s talk about coronavirus. The current situation has caused significant concern among some special needs parents and advocates in the context of education. While the fear of “losing ground” certainly weighs heavily on a lot of parents’ hearts, practical and legal issues abound.  Some Colorado parents of children with special needs have expressed concerns that the use of virtual or remote learning is, in and of itself, a violation of FAPE. Can you share your thoughts on the interaction between coronavirus restrictions, remote learning, and FAPE?    

As Stephen let us know, “FAPE is about the services offered to students. Those services are determined by an [individualized education program/plan or] IEP.” To the question of whether a “school district is providing the services that [a specific] IEP calls for, ” he said, “that is hard to say. Families should look at what is called for in the student’s IEP and compare that with what the school district is providing.”  Thanks to potential legal issues related to this topic, we’d like to pause to note that nothing mentioned in this article should be interpreted as legal advice or an endorsement of any legal actions.  

Some local parents have found variable in-person coronavirus restrictions (like the prohibition of equipment like CPAPs in a classroom setting) to be problematic. Others have worried that required screen time for remote learning could be detrimental to children who, as an example, experience seizures with prolonged display use. What, if anything, do you think that the State of Colorado could do to improve the provision of special needs education during these challenging times? 

“A couple of things come to mind. The state needs to provide concrete guidance and ensure compliance with applicable special education rules and regulations… [and] there needs to be more funding for special education services. The State of Colorado needs to provide more  money specifically earmarked for kids with special needs.” On the topic of funding, Stephen let us know that two considerations are particularly important: targeted or individualized funding and flexibility regarding the spending of funds. As he pointed out, each child is unique and every child deserves the educational services, equipment, and supports that “they need to be successful.”  

You’ve mentioned the importance of IEPs. In the status quo, though, many IEP meetings are being held virtually and may include professionals who have never even met the children they are meant to support. Is there a solution to this issue?  

“You always want the professionals with the most direct knowledge of the child present. Parents have the right to ask that those who have the most direct knowledge be present. No one should be making decisions about a child without that knowledge – no matter what the setting.” Stephen went on to explain that, in addition to parents having the right to request the participation of those with the most understanding of their child’s experience and needs, alternative modes of participation may be available. As an example, if someone familiar with a child’s needs is unable to attend a virtual meeting, they may be able to provide a written report.   

For many parents of children with special needs, the reality of “parent as para” has resulted in significant challenges (including job losses). As parents increasingly fill the roles of therapists and others for their children, what role do you think the state should or could play in providing guidance, resources, or even compensation to parents?  

“It’s hard enough to be a parent” and, for parents of children with special needs, “this role can be even more intensive.”  Parents “should not be expected to fill the role of an educator or paraprofessional… they should not be burdened in this way.” As many would likely agree, “it is very difficult to play the role of parent and educator.”  

In addition to the potential strain placed on parents who must take on one or several new roles in the context of their child’s education, Stephen let us know that this reality can also be problematic for educators and other professionals. When the roles of these individuals, who often have years of highly specialized education and experience, are adopted by necessity by others, it can create a cascading disservice. In addition to being problematic for parents, “it dismisses the trained professionals as if anyone could fill these roles, which is untrue.” While there may not be an answer to the “parent as para” problem, Stephen noted that the State could provide “additional guidance, training, and information.” 

A lack of in-person education may translate into a lack of interventions, difficult IEPs, and delayed or absent evaluations. Do you think that the potential delays experienced by children and their families will have long-term effects on their outcomes?  

“There is no doubt that Covid-19 is going to have long-term educational implications for all students.  There are probably more significant concerns for students with disabilities.” The potential for more concerns for children with special needs stems, in part, from an important element of the special education model: one-on-one attention. This is necessarily highly personalized and geared towards helping “address achievement gaps” and the needs of each student. It is, ideally, something that all students should receive. Without this, and other critical educational experiences during the pandemic, “there will be significant repercussions that we can’t even understand yet.”  

Evaluations include a “body of evidence.” Typically, “standard suites of assessments” are an important component of evaluations. Some have suggested that assessments cannot be completed (or must be delayed) due to the pandemic. Stephen explained that this is a “cop out.” Students  can be meaningfully assessed using other sources of information. Teachers, he noted, ”can assess whether a child may have special needs” even in the absence of formal assessments. A teacher’s perspective, informed by their education, professional experience, and interactions with a child is  invaluable. Observations by parents and other informal assessments can also contribute critical data. “Teachers and parents need to get creative – what is an evaluation? It is not just a standardized test.”  

So, Stephen, what do you hope to do? What issues are on your mind? 

“One of the things missing from the conversation is the importance of transportation to educational outcomes. If you look at the past year, there’s a whole group of students we’ve lost because technology wasn’t available and we don’t know how to get education to them. If we could get those students to an educational provider, then what changes could we have seen for that group of kiddos? No one is talking enough about the link between transportation and educational outcomes.” These outcomes are not specific to children with special needs. An example provided by Stephen was children experiencing homelessness. If children move (to a hotel, shelter, or other temporary accommodation), or have no fixed home, “transportation could ensure they get to stay at the same school.”  

“What doors could we open for these extremely forgotten children? My hope is that people begin to look at transportation as a service that is as important as any special education service in a classroom. It is directly related to how well or successful that student will be. Let’s talk about what transportation means and how we can do it differently.” 

Resources for Parents and Community Members 

  • Individualized Education Programs or Plans (IEPs) -   
  • State special education guidance - If you would like information on the current guidance provided by the State, including disability-specific information, visit COVID-19 and Special Education. In addition to activities and other resources, the State provides virtual meeting information for various topics. 

About Stephen 

Stephen Fusco holds a Bachelor of Arts in Political Science, a Juris Doctorate, and a Master of Education in Behavioral and Learning Disabilities. His professional roles have included Vice President of Policy and Research at A+ Colorado, Educational Advocate and Pro-Bono Attorney with Advocacy Denver and The Center for Special Education Law, and Deputy General Counsel with Denver Public Schools. He currently serves as corporate counsel for HopSkipDriveRecent publications include Access to Mental Health Services in Denver Schools: Recommendations for Mental Health Funding in DPS , COVID-19 Learning Loss: Recommendations to Improve Student Outcomes During COVID-19 Pandemic, and Colorado School Districts: Initial Response to COVID-19. 

A quick disclaimer: none of the viewpoints or opinions expressed or inferred herein should be interpreted as legal advice. All questions, and their answers, are personal and do not necessarily represent the views of the Morgridge College of Education or the University of Denver. 

 

MCE Hooding Ceremony Information

The MCE Hooding Ceremonies for 2020 and 2021 doctoral graduates of the Morgridge College of Education are under way! Attendance is limited, but every ceremony will be live-streamed online. Please check back regularly for updated event information.

On This Page:

Schedule Change

The schedule for the August 20, 2021 ceremony has changed: there will now be a single ceremony beginning at 9:00am. All 2020 and 2021 graduates will participate in one ceremony.

Registration Closed

The deadline to register for the August 20, 2021 hooding ceremony has passed. All inquiries about the ceremony should be sent to mce.marketing@du.edu.

Confirming Registration: Registered participants will receive a confirmation e-mail around 2 weeks before the event. If you are unsure if you registered, or would like to verify your registration, please send a note to us and be sure to include your full name.

Late Registration: If you missed the deadline but still want to participate, send us an email with your name, dissertation title, and advisor. We may be able to process your request but cannot guarantee that your information will be included in the program or other resources.

Important Safety and Attendance Information

DU Covid-19 regulations and limitations will apply to all ceremony dates. For daily updates on DU’s current restrictions, please visit DU Coronavirus Alert Levels.

Safety Basics

The following guidelines are subject to change and were last updated on June 27, 2021.

  • A maximum of 4 guests are allowed.
  • Graduates will be treated as DU community members and will need to complete a COVID-19 survey at check-in for the event.
  • Masks will be required at all times.

Watch Ceremonies Live

To view any of the MCE Doctoral Hooding Ceremonies, visit our MCEatDU YouTube Channel. Livestreams will be available during each event. Recordings will be available after.

Graduate FAQs (What to Expect)

The Day of Your Ceremony

  • Where is the ceremony?
    In the Village Green, which is the outdoor space between Ruffatto Hall and the new Dimond Residential Village.
  • How many guests can I bring?
    You may bring a maximum of 4 guests.
  • When should I arrive? Where should I go?  
    Arrive 30 minutes before your ceremony, please. Meet us at the Outdoor Classroom.
  • Do I need to stay after the ceremony?
    Please do! Immediately after the ceremony, graduates can go to Ruffatto Hall to get professional photos taken with a backdrop.
  • Should I wear my cap and gown?
    Yes! For more information on what graduates wear, check out Graduation Regalia.
  • Do I carry my hood or wear it before the ceremony?
    Bring your hood with you, but do not wear it.
  • What actually happens during the ceremony – what can I expect?
    Graduates will process (march) into the ceremony space, as will the faculty. Program-by-program and faculty-by-faculty, individual grads will be invited up to the stage to be “hooded” by their faculty advisor (or faculty designee). Grads will have an opportunity to say a few words to the audience (both in-person and virtual!). Speaking time will be limited to 2 minutes. Grads will then exit the stage and return to their seat. There will be welcoming remarks by the Dean and closing remarks by an Associate Dean.
  • Where should I park?
    Daily parking should be available for all ceremonies. If passes or permits are issued, students will receive them via e-mail.

Steps to Attending

Important: Please complete the DU Visitor Access Protocol before arriving on campus.
  • For the question, “Please provide the name and email address of the DU employee who is coordinating your visit” enter:
    1. First Name: Eric
    2. Last Name: Mareck
    3. E-mail: Eric.Mareck@du.edu
  • For the question, “What building(s) and room number(s) will you be visiting?” enter:
    1. Building Name(s): Ruffatto Hall
    2. Room Number(s): 100

Ceremony Dates and Times

2020 Ceremonies  

Hooding Ceremonies for 2020 Graduates will be held on May 14 (1-3:00pm), June 10 (3-5:00pm), and August 20 (3-5:00pm).

2021 Spring & Summer Ceremonies 

The Hooding Ceremonies for Fall 2020, Winter 2021, Spring 2021, and Summer 2021 graduates will be held on two dates: June 10 from 9:00am to 1:00pm and August 20 from 9:00am to 1:00pm. Exact times will be based on department or program.

Schedule

The schedule for the ceremony has changed: there will now be a single ceremony beginning at 9:00am on August 20, 2021. All 2020 and 2021 graduates will participate in one ceremony.

At-a-Glance

May 14 June 10 August 20
1:00pm 9:00am 12:00pm 3:00pm 9:00am 12:00pm 3:00pm
2020 – All
2021 – ELPS
2021 – HED
2021 – RMS
2021 – C&I
2021 – CP
2021 – SP

Video & Photography

Photography

A photographer will take photos during the event. After the ceremony, graduates can have a professional photo taken.

Videos

For livestreams or recordings, visit the MCEatDU YouTube Channel.

MCE Supports BIPOC Students, Staff and Faculty

Published April 20, 2021

Dear MCE Community,

The past weeks have again demonstrated the continued necessity for action toward social justice and against racial violence. We live and learn in a time of on-going tragedy marked most recently by mass shootings in Atlanta, Boulder, and Indianapolis, the police-shootings and deaths of Adam Toledo in Chicago and Daunte Wright outside of Minneapolis, and the trial of Derek Chauvin for the murder of George Floyd. These tragedies are pressing upon our hearts, our minds, and our souls. Together we struggle to make sense of the role of a college focused on education, mental health, and information science in supporting our BIPOC community and building a better world.

We write to you today to provide resources of support, engagement, and action toward addressing systemic racism and building a better world where everyone has the opportunity to thrive.

Support

For those in our community who might appreciate specific mental health support, we want you to know about services available to members of the DU Community.

Engagement

For those who would like to engage with other members of the MCE Community in providing peer-to-peer support, processing current events, and/or just desire a space to be in community rather than alone right now, we want you to know about these organized meetups and conversations that have been planned across the College. These include program/department specific groupings, student affinity groups, and a special student-to-student only group organized by COESA.

Action

For those who want to participate in one or more of the newly forming MCE DEI Council Task Forces, including a specific task force to address support and success of BIPOC students, we want you to know about these on-going action groups that are designing and implementing new reforms, practices, and programs to help MCE better live its mission and continue creating an intentional culture that values diversity, equity, and inclusivity as we battle against racial discrimination, inequality, and dehumanization.

We recognize each individual incident of gun violence, police violence, and racialized violence is but symptoms of broader systemically designed problems related to the white supremacist and settler colonial foundations of our country and the global economic system. Within these systems of oppression, it is evident that different cultural communities are impacted differentially, and by design, Black, Indigenous, and People of Color (BIPOC) are particularly targeted for discrimination and systemic disadvantage.

We categorically denounce white supremacy and settler colonialism.

At the same time, we recognize that higher education and the University of Denver itself, were founded and established through practices and policies that benefitted from and perpetuated these systems of oppression. Any effort to engender equity and subvert foundational inequality at interpersonal, organizational, and systemic levels of influence will most likely be insufficient, particularly in light of the generational pain, harm, and dehumanization that historically marginalized communities – and BIPOC in particular – have endured. The collective trauma and grief that our BIPOC community members are acutely experiencing right now is a clarion call for immediate and on-going redress that we are committed to collaboratively supporting. Over the rest of Spring Quarter, we commit to informing the MCE Community of our on-going efforts to support, engage, and take action in making progress toward serving our BIPOC community members. BIPOC students, staff, and faculty deserve the best of MCE and our best must continue to get better.

We hope you will join us in the ways you find meaningful and rewarding. We are dedicated to making MCE a stronghold of social justice, which means we will continue to take action, reflect, take stock, and return to action. Such is our social justice praxis.

 

Sincerely,

The Morgridge College of Education

You’re Invited: Webinars for Incoming Students 

Do you have questions about financial aid? Are you curious about research opportunities? Join us virtually to learn more about the MCE experience. Check back regularly for updated webinar details and new events. If you a miss a session, don’t worry – we’ll post recordings of past events.  

Upcoming

Program Information  

Details coming soon. 

  • When: June, 2021  
  • Zoom Link: Coming Soon 

Past Events

Incoming Student Social

This is an opportunity to connect with other incoming students within your program. This will be informal, allowing you to get to know future classmates without a structured agenda.

Recorded: June 8, 2021

A public video is not available for this event. 

Deposited Student Webinar 

Get ready for all things Morgridge! Learn about “next steps” including preparing for registration, important dates, orientation, your first day, and much more! 

Recorded: May 27, 2021  

Life in Denver 

Want to know more about the Denver metro area? We’ve got you covered. Join us for this webinar to get connected to local resources and learn about neighborhoods. 

Recorded: April 29,  2021 from 1:00pm – 2:00pm MT

Get Engaged: MCE Centers, Institutes, and Research Opportunities  

Have you heard of the PELE CenterOr the Ricks Center for Gifted Children? These are just two of the centers and institutions at MCE that promote innovative approaches and provide research opportunities.  Explore our directory to learn more about these and other institutes.  

Recorded: April 21, 2021

Graduate Student Life

Learn about graduate student life at MCE! In addition to student activities, you’ll find out about the College of Education Student Association (COESA).

Recorded: March 31, 2021

Get More Info 

If you have questions, please reach out to us. You can find additional information about campus, housing, and more at Resources for Students.   

April 9, 2021 – On February 19, 2021, it was announced that Dr. Karen Riley, Dean of the Morgridge College of Education, would be leaving to join Regis University as Provost. Dr. Bruce Uhrmacher has agreed to serve as Interim Dean of the Morgridge College of Education, starting May 1, 2021.

Dr. Uhrmacher has been a long-serving member of the MCE faculty, with expertise in curriculum and instruction as well as research methods and statistics.

Dr. Uhrmacher has served as both past Chair of the Educational Research, Policy, and Practice department and current Interim Chair of the Higher Education department.  Having earned his undergraduate degree at the University of Wisconsin-Madison and two masters degrees at Indiana University and Harvard University, respectively, Professor Uhrmacher was awarded a Ph.D. in the design and evaluation of educational programs from Stanford University.

MCE is extraordinarily fortunate to have Dr. Uhrmacher lead MCE through the transition to our next Dean.  Dr. Uhrmacher is a deeply thoughtful teacher-scholar and caring leader who exemplifies DU and MCE’s commitments to the highest standards of integrity and collegiality.

April 2, 2021 – I’m blessed with the guidance and wisdom of many teachers and mentors. I have my colleagues, friends and institutional leaders who offer advice. The shelves in my office are crammed with books, each holding a different key to the puzzle of effective teaching. My students are always a good source of wisdom and counsel on how to teach more effectively and with greater integrity. All I need do is listen and not discount their feedback or inflate my ego with their complementsBut my most faithful and oldest teacher is nature. When I go for a walk the bigness of the natural world helps unravel my questions and problems. I often find wisdom in the ways that nature responds to challenge and creates opportunities for growth. For instance, life is both fragile and tenacious. This is a good reminder to me that the learning relationships I seek with students are fragile (easily broken) and tenacious (can weather through tough times and challenges). 

Nature’s wisdom and its application to teaching has been on my mind lately, or more accurately it has been on my heart. The last few days the wind has been blowing with a persistent fierceness. I can hear it moving across the landscape, gathering speed, before it whips through the trees outside my window. It sounds like the shingles on the roof will be torn free at any moment. Nature teaches me that sometimes the best way to handle the wind of change is to get out in it and feel the fullness of its power. So that is what I did. I walked the high hills near my house. A treeless landscape where the wind is free to flow over and through the ravines, ridges and particularities of the land. It fills all of existence. It fills my very being with its energy and passion 

Strange thing about wind. It is both a physical and spiritual phenomenon. Many, Eastern, Indigenous and Western wisdom traditions speak of wind as the creative force of the gods, divine beings and eternal ones. In these stories, wind can be as gentle as the breath of life and as violent as storms stirring the waters of the earth in preparation for that which is yet to be born. The winds of my teaching life are also like this. They can be creative and destructive, containing both physical and spiritual dimensions. 

As I walked, I reflected on the relationship between wind and teaching; both as an element of creation and a force for change. I was reminded of Cornel West’s description of “prophetic pragmatism” as a unique American philosophy for both acting as an agent of change while living into the perpetual and destructive nature of racism. Prophet in the sense of being a voice of radial social critique of inequalities and dehumanizing structures. Teachers can be prophetic winds speaking truth to power, creating spaces where marginalized learners experience humanizing forms of pedagogyTeachers can enact a form of tough love directed toward the betterment of schooling as an institution. The poet Rosemerry Wahtola Trommer in her poem “Home” describes this form of love in this way; icomes crashing in / like western wind, breaking branches / and rearranging the yard, as if to say / it is here to change everything”. Yet prophetic-love is also pragmatic. It is a form of wisdom that realizes the struggle for freedom is elongated and complicated requiring a long-view and the capacity to adjust. It is a learning tradition that relishes in personal struggle, always leaning forward in gentle and persistent provocation to challenge systems of power and privilege.  

As I walked, I noticed that at times the wind was to my back. I was a participant in the process of change. Dust and rocks dislodged by my feet scoured the trailside, changing the ground with each step. Such is often the case when I take an activist role to help sustain change in schools or in my classroom. But when I turned a corner in the trail, the wind and I were now face to face. If I wasn’t careful, I was pushed off balance and found myself stumbling along on unsure feet. For teachers as prophets they are sometimes part of the winds of change. And at times they must face into the winds of institutional normalcy that are often set against their will toward freedom and liberty. West’s invitation toward “prophetic pragmatism is particularly relevant in these moments. Sailors know that by setting their sails at 22 degrees to a squall they can tack into the wind and move toward, not away, from their destination. Pragmatism is a form of strategic tacking in response to the winds that push toward the status quo and maintenance of power and privilege in schools and classrooms.  

My last reflection on walking into and with the wind is that it is hard work. I arrived home feeling refreshed, blown clean, but also slightly disoriented. My body still remembered all the ways it had swayed, stumbled and sought out firm footing. Even standing still I was still in motion. The question I now held was how to remain strong and resilient while practicing “prophetic pragmatism” in my teaching? Success in teaching, as practiced in Western-industrial societies, is often measured and calibrated according to external standards. Many teachers “measure up” to these metrics but the cost can be high in terms of their heart’s longing and burnout. The teacher as prophet is walking a path that never ends and thus the future is not theirs. I find an element of comfort in this truth. My success as an agent of change cannot be measured and catalogued as some fixed goal to achieve, but it can be witnessed in the day to day actions I take to create life-giving instructional spaces. Additionally, knowing that the trail of freedom and justice is long and winding reminds me of the importance of resting and participating in self-care. Being a prophet of a future that is not my own means that I can rest without guilt, renewing my heart and spirit for those times when the wind is in my face. But rest is not retreat or complacency. I must always remember that even in a restful state my body, my heart, my soul knows its true purpose is to keep dancing with the winds of change.   

Morgridge Ranked in Top 100 Graduate Colleges of Education 

Morgridge College of Education has entered the top 100 best Graduate Colleges of Education, representing a jump of 27 spots in U.S. News rankings. Two programs have been named in the top 35We are thrilled to share this good news, reflecting the dedication and commitment that the Morgridge community – our students, faculty, staff, alumni, donors, parents and community members – have contributed to the College to reach this milestone. Morgridge is now ranked 85th in the top graduate schools in education.  

“The acknowledgment from US New World Report is certainly meaningful, but what is truly inspiring is what this recognition signifies” said Morgridge Dean, Dr. Karen Riley. “This acknowledgement represents dedication and commitment of every member of our community and demonstrates our collective pledge to teaching, service and scholarship.” 

The College of Education traces its roots back to the 1890s when teacher preparation was its primary focus. Today, in addition to teacher preparation, the College has expanded to offer master’s and doctoral degrees in the disciplines across the spectrum of education, wellness, data, information and human development. 

Program Rankings 

Morgridge’s Educational Leadership and Policy Studies program has maintained a spot as one of the top Education Administration programs in the nation. This year, the program came in at number 21 on the annual list, up 4 spots from last year. The College’s Library and Information Science program is also well represented, ranking 35th. Both programs at Morgridge have a deep commitment to serving our community, which allow their students to engage in impactful and invaluable experiences, setting them apart from competitors.  

The Library and Information Science program offers innovative practices in a rapidly changing digital era, a unique specialization in research data management prepares graduates to immerse themselves in the research data lifecycle. The Educational Leadership program prepares equity focused, transformative leaders and immerses students in field-based learning that prepares them to meet challenges within complex systems. Each student’s experience is customized to their individual needs and the school where they work.  

“At a time when education is facing some of the most challenging circumstances in recent history we could not be prouder of the impact of our research and community engagement,” continued Dr. Riley. “Facilitating the development of leaders in education, mental health, and data and research science remains the core of our mission as a college of education. Our faculty, students, staff and alumni are working every day to improve the lives of individuals in our communities.”  

 Thank you again for your tremendous contributions to the Morgridge College of Education. 

The Ranking Process 

Each year, U.S. News & World Report ranks professional school programs in business, education, engineering, law, medicine and nursing, including specialties in each area. The Best Graduate Schools rankings in these areas are based on two types of data: Expert opinions about program excellence and statistical indicators that measure the quality of a school’s faculty, research and students. The data for the rankings in all six disciplines comes from statistical surveys of more than 2,000 programs and from reputation surveys sent to more than 24,000 academics and professionals, conducted in fall 2020 and early 2021.  


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