The Morgridge College of Education (MCE) is proud to recognize the faculty and students participating at the 2016 AERA Annual Meeting: “Public Scholarship to Educate Diverse Democracies.” If you would like to find out more about the sessions being presented by MCE faculty, students and alumni then review the list below.

The Roles of Transfer and Forgetting in the Persistence and Fadeout of Early Childhood Mathematics Interventions 
Douglas H. Clements, PhD; Julie Sarama, PhD
Sat, April 9: 10:35am-12:05pm, Convention Center, Level Two, Exhibit Hall D

Drs. Clements and Sarama will present their research on how the fadeout effect can be explained by a treatment-control difference during the forgetting of mathematics knowledge. They will present their findings on the fadeout of academic intervention impacts using the OLS probability regression analysis. Results indicate that while it is not the primary contributor of the fadeout, it is a significant contributor. It was found that the magnitude of this treatment-control difference in forgetting accounts for about 28% of the size of the fadeout effect of an early mathematics intervention.

Evaluating a Revised Developmental Progression for Volume Measurement—Kindergarten Through Grade 2
Douglas W. Van Dine, PhD
Sat, April 9: 10:35am-12:05pm, Convention Center, Level Two, Exhibit Hall D

Dr. Van Dine will present his research, which used Rasch modeling, on developmental progressions for filling, packing, building, and comparing volume measurement for Kindergarten through Grade 2. Van Dine will also present results, which indicate support that the developmental progressions are valid.

Academics in the Earliest Years of Formal Schooling: Building Evidence for Policy and Practice
Douglas H. Clements, PhD; Julie Sarama, PhD
Sat, April 9: 2:15-3:45pm, Convention Center, Level One, Room 146 A

This session explores a range of policy questions related to preschool and kindergarten. Faculty will present papers which explore questions related to academic and non-academic time in the earliest years of school as well as the effects of policy changes and interventions on a range of important student outcomes.

Technology & Transformation: Two Professors’ Experience Teaching Online for the First Time
Norma Hafenstein, PhD; Nicole Joseph, PhD
Saturday, April 9: 4:05-5:35pm, Convention Center Level Two, Exhibit Hall B

Drs. Hafenstein and Joseph will report the findings of a faculty self-study research they conducted to document and analyze their first-time experiences teaching in a virtual environment, including prior expectations, professional development, and the transferability of face-to-face pedagogical techniques and strategies.

Elliot Eisner SIG Business Meeting
P. Bruce Uhrmacher, PhD (Meeting Chair)
Saturday, April 9: 6:15-7:45pm, Convention Center Room 159A

In this meeting—chaired by Dr. Uhrmacher—Dr. Joel Westheimer will discuss the relationships between the work of Elliot Eisner and the 2016 Annual Meeting theme, “Public Scholarship to Educate Diverse Democracies.” Attendees will have input into the direction of the SIG as we discuss a variety of business matters.

Eisner in Mind: Fresh Perspectives on Inquiry and Education
P. Bruce Uhrmacher, PhD (Session Chair)
Sunday, April 10: 10:35am-12:05pm, Convention Center Room 153

Assessing and Increasing Novice Teachers’ Efficacy in Working with Families
Kirsten Hermanutz; Gloria Miller, PhD
Monday, April 11: 7:45-9:15am, Convention Center Room 141

Hermanutz and Dr. Miller will share their recently completed study to examine novice teachers’ self-reported efficacy, a factor affecting the attrition rate of novice teachers. Results are tied to specific field experiences enhancing novice educators’ efficacy about working with families and lessen the likelihood of leaving the field.

Discovery-Based STEM Learning 2.0: Are We There Yet?
Douglas H. Clements, PhD (Presentation Chair)
Monday, April 11: 7:45-9:45am, Marriott Marquis Level Two Salon 12

Approaching the centennial of Dewey’s ‘Democracy and Learning,’ presenters will appraise whether the field has realized John Dewey’s vision of meaningfully situated learning by establishing their contribution in a design study of STEM cognition and instruction.

A Rasch Analysis of the Current Opioid Misuse Measure for Chronic Pain Patients
Lilian Chimuma; Kathy E. Green, PhD; Courtney Morris
Monday, April 11: 11:45am-1:15pm, Marriott Marquis Level Two Salon Four

Chimuma, Dr. Green, and Morris will present results of using the Current Opioid Misuse Measure—used by clinicians—to monitor patients on long-term opioid therapy, using the Rasch model for dimensionality and scale use. They will discuss the results in detail, including suggestions for measure revision and future research.

Many-Faceted Rasch Measurement: Assessing Rater Errors in Performance Assessment
Priyalatha Govindasamy; Kathy Green, PhD; Jessica Lerner, EdS; Maria del Carmen Salazar, PhD
Monday, April 11: 2:45-4:15pm, Marriott Marquis Level Two Salon Four

The presentation of this paper will address the teacher supervisors (raters) potential errors through Many Faceted Rasch Measurement (MFRM), a complex process in which raters tend to introduce errors that are not attributed to the actual ratees’ performance.

The Design & Implementation of an Evaluation Model for Equitable & Effective Teaching
Priyalatha Govindasamy; Kathy Green, PhD; Jessica Lerner, EdS; Maria del Carmen Salazar, PhD
Tuesday, April 12: 12:25-1:55pm, Convention Center Level Three Ballroom B

Govindasamy, Dr. Green, Lerner, and Dr. Salazar will describe the development, implementation, analysis, and results of a research study to design a preservice teacher evaluation tool known as the Framework for Equitable and Effective Teaching (FEET), and will assess rater bias, analyze measures of reliability and validity, and identify implications for revising the evaluation model and training for supervisors.

Teacher Education Program (TEP) student Krystal Giles participated in a round-table discussion with Denver Mayor Michael B. Hancock as part of the Make Your Mark campaign. The round-table, hosted by Denver Public Schools (DPS) Acting Superintendent Susana Cordova and Mayor Hancock, focused on the important role teachers of color play as advocates and role models for students of color.

The Make your Mark Campaign is an initiative dedicated to diversifying the faculty population working in Denver schools by recruiting educators of color. Mayor Hancock, DPS, six charter school networks, and several foundations have teamed up to lead this campaign. Their goal is to assure that the faculty working in Denver schools better reflects the diverse student population.

Diversifying teacher demographics is especially important in Denver. Statistics from Make Your Mark show that—in DPS—while over 75% of Denver students are of color, teachers of color make up less than 25% of the regions educators.

As part of the TEP field experience requirement, Giles, a Dual Degree Teacher Education candidate at MCE, works as an Apprentice Teacher at Barnum Elementary School in Denver. She was invited to participate in the round-table through the connections she developed during her field experience.

MCE promotes inclusive excellence and diversity in all of its programs, and recruits students who have a passion for inclusivity. Students like Giles are trained to become ideal candidates for schools looking to employ teachers dedicated to serving diverse populations.

The Morgridge College of Education (MCE) had a substantial presence at the 2016 Rocky Mountain Early Childhood Conference, which was held in Denver and attracted over 2,500 participants. Faculty from the Early Childhood Special Education (ECSE) program, Kennedy Institute, and Marsico Institute were all in attendance along with Students from several MCE programs. MCE faculty and students presenting included:

  • Julie Sarama, Ph.D – MCE Faculty and Kennedy Endowed Chair in Innovative Learning Technologies
  • Douglas H. Clements, Ph.D – MCE Faculty and Kennedy Endowed Chair in Early Childhood Learning
  • Jeanine Coleman, Ph.D – ECSE Clinical Assistant Professor
  • Pilyoung Kim, Ph.D – Assistant Professor at DU’s School of Art, Humanities and Social Science
  • Rachel Schiff-Gray – ECSE Alumni
  • Heather Blizzard – RMS Graduate Student
  • Laura Dietert – CI Graduate Student
  • Ksenia Polson – RMS Graduate Student
  • Jessica Carswell – ECSE MA Student
  • Tara Brand – ECSE MA Student
  • Katie Belleau – ECSE MA Student
  • Brita Strub – ECSE Cert Student
  • Hazuki Tochihara – – ECSE Alumni

Drs. Clements and Sarama were the keynote speakers for the conference alongside Dr. Bob Sornson Founder of the Early Learning Foundation. They started the Saturday morning conference with their presentation on early math education setting the stage for the rest of the event.

“A few of the teachers in the audience commented that they could not wait to share what they had learned” said Heather Blizzard a Ph.D student in the Research Methods and Statistics (RMS) program. Blizzard presented on the effects of teaching geometry to young children alongside her peers Laura Dietert and Ksenia Polson.

The Morgridge College of Education is proud to recognize the faculty, alumni, and students from the Early Childhood Special Education program who will be presenting at the 2016 Rocky Mountain Early Childhood Conference in Denver on February 19 and 20.

This Is Your Brain on Poverty: Helping Families Overcome the Effects
Pilyoung Kim & Rachel Schiff-Gray (ECSE MA Graduate)
Friday February 19, 11:00am – Colorado Convention Center Room 604

This workshop will provide early childhood professionals an overview of the effect of poverty on brain development and practical evidence-based strategies that can help families overcome some of these effects. This workshop is ideal for participants who work with children exposed to poverty.

Saturday Keynote Address – The Building Blocks of Mathematics
Dr. Douglas H. Clements (MCE Faculty) & Dr. Julie Sarama (MCE Faculty)
Saturday February 20, 7:45am – Colorado Convention Center

What are the building blocks of mathematics? How important are they? Drs. Clements and Sarama will answer these questions by summarizing recent research and development work including works they helped write. These works include the National Research Council report on early childhood mathematics, the report of President Bush’s National Math Advisory Panel, and the Common Core. Effective instructional approaches featured in this session include basing instruction on learning trajectories, which will be illustrated through a set of NSF- and IES-funded projects. Video segments and hands-on activities will provide concrete examples.

The Power of Knowledge: Teaching Geometry to Young Children
Heather Blizzard, Laura Dietert, and Ksenia Polson (MCE Graduate Students)
Saturday February 20th, 9:00am

This session will include a presentation of graduate student research on the best methods for teaching geometry to young children. The presentation includes a workshop that will provide instruction to administrators and teachers on how to better discuss attributes of mathematical shapes with preschoolers.

Effective Inclusive Partnerships: Collaborating with Parents
Jessica Carswell, Tara Brand, and Katie Belleau (ECSE MA Students)
Saturday February 20, 9:15am – Colorado Convention Center Room 702

Participants will learn about the importance of keeping parents involved with inclusive practices within a classroom. The presenters will provide strategies for effective communication between all specialists, guardians and teachers involved in supporting a child’s development.

Engaging Ways to Support Fine Motor Development
Brita Strub (ECSE Certificate Graduate)
Saturday February 20, 9:15am – Colorado Convention Center Room 605

In this workshop participants will learn fun, easy, and effective ways to increase students’ fine motor skills. Participants will be able to implement these into the classroom immediately, in both large group and small group settings. The activities are easy to differentiate, set up/clean up, and interactive.

To Kindergarten & Beyond! Parents’ Perspective & Supporting Transitions
Hazuki Tochihara (ECSE Graduate) & Ali Van Heusen
Saturday February 20, 11:00am – Colorado Convention Center Room 502

This presentation will share firsthand accounts of what parents and guardians of young children with special needs have experienced before, during, and after major transitions, such as welcoming an infant with a disability to a family and going to Kindergarten.

Evidence-Based Practices for Children with Disabilities
Jeanine Coleman, Ph.D. (ECSE Clinical Assistant Professor) & Lissanna Follari
Saturday February 20, 1:30pm – Colorado Convention Center Room 402

The Division for Early Childhood recently published a new version of Recommended Practices. This presentation will bring the Recommended Practices to life by giving participants realistic examples of how to implement the practices within inclusive early childhood environments.

Teaching Strategies Gold: A Collaboration between ECE & ECSE Teachers
Jeanine Coleman, Ph.D. (ECSE Clinical Assistant Professor) & Max Panten
Saturday February 20, 3:15pm – Colorado Convention Center Room 402

This workshop will present a guide for itinerant Early Childhood Special Education (ECSE) teachers to use Teaching Strategies Gold (TSG) in collaboration with Early Childhood Education (ECE) teachers. ECSE and ECE teachers will understand how to use TSG to plan for differentiated instruction for children with disabilities, plan for tiered intervention strategies for children who are at risk for delays, and inform Individualized Education Program (IEP) annual reviews.

 

Research Methods and Statistics Ph.D Candidate Priyalatha Govindasamy received top award at the University of Denver Research and Performance Summit (DURAPS) on January 29. Govindasamy presented her research at the DURAPS poster session highlighting the software package that she has been developing with Antonio Olmos, Ph.D and Kellie Keeling, Ph.D.

Govindasamy explained that “effect size is the key to conducting meta-analysis, but not all the studies report empirical information required for computing effect sizes.” Studies will often report different types of statistical information that require different mathematical algorithms to compute effective sizes. To overcome this hurdle, Govindasamy and her supporting faculty developed the Effectssizecalculator Package in R for Meta-Analysis. This package was designed to compile all different mathematical algorithms and estimate the effective sizes into one module and leverages the R statistical analysis software.

The Morgridge College of Education would like to congratulate Miss Govindasamy on her award and recognize her fascinating research.

Now Recruiting Research Participants

Are you or your son/daughter between the ages of 6 and 25 years old? Do you like playing computer games? Your participation in this study could help us learn more about thinking and reasoning in individuals with intellectual disability.

The purpose of this research is to evaluate specialized tests for tracking cognitive changes.

wHO cAN pARICIPATE?1-29-16 MCE Research Measuring Cognitive Development in Individuals with Intellectual Disabilities Photo 2

  • Individuals with a confirmed diagnosis of intellectual disability caused by Down syndrome, fragile X syndrome, or another cause.
  • Males and females, between 6 – 25 years old
wHAT dOES THE sTUDY iNVOLVE

  • Cognitive and behavioral evaluations during 2-­‐3 visits. These visits typically last about 4-­‐4.5 hours scheduled over a two-day period.
wHAT wILL i RECEIVE?

  • The study will provide $30 compensation for your time and effort for the 1st study visit, $20 for the 2nd study visit, and $50 for the 3rd study visit.
  • One of our research psychologists will provide feedback on cognitive assessment results.
  • We can offer reimbursement for lodging and travel to the University of Denver from your home
aDDITIONAL iNFORMATION

The University of Denver is a private university dedicated to the public good.

All studies take place at the Morgridge College of Education which is located at 1999 E. Evans Ave. Denver, CO 80210.

Sign Up for rESEARCH

To learn more about participating in research, call Jeanine Coleman at 303-­‐871-­‐2496 or email
Jeanine.coleman@du.edu.

The Morgridge College of Education at the University of Denver hosted a screening of the Rocky Mountain PBS (RMPBS) film, Standing in the Gap, on Thursday, January 21. Over 250 attendees joined a welcome reception at Katherine Ruffatto Hall followed by a viewing of the documentary at Davis Auditorium.

The event featured a panel discussion moderated by Maria del Carmen Salazar, PhD, Associate Professor, Curriculum Studies & Teaching, Morgridge College of Education.

Panelists included:

  • Antonio Esquibel, Executive Director of West Denver Network Schools, Denver Public Schools
  • Burt Hubbard, Reporter, Rocky Mountain PBS News
  • Karen Riley, PhD, Dean, Morgridge College of Education
  • Julie Speer, Senior Executive Producer, RMPBS

Standing in the Gap explores the impact of federally mandated busing for Denver Public Schools, as well as the re-segregation that occurred when busing ended in the 1990s. During the film, students, parents, faculty, and administrators describe the challenges they face with segregation and the achievement gaps that continue to exist between white students and students of color.

The panelists stressed the importance of funding for schools, early childhood education, evidence-based best practices, and community and family involvement. The panel discussion was lively with a clear sense that there is not one magic bullet, but that there are strategies that schools, districts, and institutions of higher education are – and can — employ immediately.

The screening was included as part of the University of Denver’s annual Diversity Summit on Inclusive Excellence which is hosted by the Center for Multicultural Excellence. The theme of this year’s summit is “Beyond Good Intentions: Confronting My Bias to Change Our Community”. The documentary is part of RMPBS’s Race in Colorado initiative, produced with the goal to create a new vision for living in diverse communities and to demonstrate how systemic change will benefit communities.

The department of Educational Leadership and Policy Studies (ELPS) at the Morgridge College of Education hosted a colloquium on November 30 that focused on the challenges and experiences of turnaround schools in the greater Denver area. The event featured a panel discussion between principals of current turnaround schools as well as district administrators working with turnaround schools.

The colloquium’s panelists, all of whom have graduated from, or are current students of, the Turnaround Success Program, included:

  • Peter Sherman, Executive Director of the District & School Performance Unit at the Colorado Department of Education
  • LaDawn Baity, Instructional Superintendent and former principal of Trevista at Horace Mann
  • Ivan Duran, Assistant Superintendent for Elementary Education, a graduate of Denver Public Schools, and a current EdD candidate at the Morgridge College of Education
  • Nick Dawkins, principal at Manual High School
  • Lisa Mahannah, principal at Oakland Elementary
  • Julie Murgel, principal at DCIS Montbello
  • Jésus Rodríguez, principal at Trevista at Horace Mann and current doctoral candidate at the Morgridge College of Education

The panelists held a discussion about the realities of providing leadership in turnaround schools and the many factors, internal and external, which can contribute to a school requiring turnaround services. Pre-conceived notions about communities, the difficulty of providing adequate mental health services, and disparities in low-income and disadvantaged communities all contribute to a lack of student success.

Culture was an important theme of the discussion; panelists talked about how important it is to create a structure and provide high expectations and accountability to change students’ perceptions of learning.

A second, and significant, theme of the evening was innovation. The ability to innovate varies between each school due to differences in priorities. Despite this, panelists all agreed that having the ability to take initiative to get results in schools is of the utmost importance.

After the panel discussion, attendees engaged in a design thinking activity in collaboration with the Daniels College of Business. Jennifer Larson, a student at the Daniels College, led a brief presentation describing design thinking – the experience of “how” rather than just “what,” and asking “what if we?” or “why can’t we?” – in relation to solving a challenge. The activity included participants breaking out into groups to learn from each other about unique experiences with challenges in their educational work.

Susan Korach, the ELPS Department Chair, closed the event by asking what the audience heard and did not hear from panelists and fellow participants. Attendees noted that they did not hear discussions about test scores or practicing for assessments, nor did they hear pessimism or excuses from their colleagues about the work they do. They did hear an emphasis on relationship-building in their communities, honesty about equity and oppression, and hope and optimism regarding the future.

The 6th annual Students of Color Reception held on November 11, 2015 had its biggest turnout ever with over 100 community members, students, and educators in attendance. The reception, which is held every year and is moderated by Dr. Frank Tuitt, is designed to give MCE students of color a forum to discuss their experiences in the College and on campus.

The panel this year consisted of students across a range of programs, and included:

The panelists described their experiences as first-generation and underrepresented students and stressed the value of the cohort model used at MCE. Richard Maize, who is in his last year of the Dual Degree Program in Teacher Education, explained that the cohorts create a feeling of belonging and community.

Panelists described how faculty members’ embrace all students into the academic community going as far as to provide customized research opportunities tailored to the student interests and background. Research Methods and Statistics Ph.D student, Kawana Bright, explained that the flexibility of her degree enabled her to focus on a very specific and unique topic of interest for her dissertation.

During the Q&A session, panelists discussed scholarship opportunities for students and the funding of graduate degrees, work life balance, and the need for commitment to your degree.

The evening’s discussion was made particularly poignant by the current events happening at the University of Missouri. The experiences of students of color on campuses across the nation is a topic of much conversation among MCE students and faculty who care deeply about providing an inclusive college environment and strive to support a diverse community where all students feel they belong.

LEWISVILLE, N.C. – Kaplan Early Learning Company announced today the launch of an innovative approach to early childhood education that puts math and science at the forefront of learning. Connect4Learning: The Pre-K Curriculum is a research-based, interdisciplinary approach to learning that was developed by nationally recognized experts in early childhood education and through funding from the National Science Foundation.

The Connect4Learning (C4L) curriculum, available January, is exclusively sold through Kaplan Early Learning Company. A preview of the curriculum and its components will be revealed at the National Association for the Education of Young Children conference on November 18. Curriculum principal investigators are Julie Sarama, PhD, University of Denver; Kimberly Brenneman, PhD, Heising-Simons Foundation; Douglas H. Clements, PhD, University of Denver; Nell K. Duke, EdD, University of Michigan; and Mary Louise Hemmeter, PhD, Vanderbilt University.

After years of research and classroom testing, C4L’s principal investigators designed the curriculum to address growing concerns that the majority of Pre-K instructional time is not balanced among literacy, science, math, and social-emotional domains. One study found that a literacy-based curriculum teaches only 58 seconds of mathematics instruction in a 6-hour day.* Limited opportunities for early math and science learning are factors that can contribute to the United States falling behind other countries in math and science proficiency**.

The C4L prekindergarten curriculum includes 6 units that address 140 measurable learning objectives and support children’s development of 10 fundamental cognitive processes. The learning objectives are fully aligned with the new Head Start Outcomes Framework and state early learning standards. C4L seamlessly integrates child-centered activities with teacher-led instruction. With its project-based approach and rich vocabulary use, C4L aligns with recommended practices to support dual-language learners and children from under-resourced communities. Fundamental to the curriculum is the importance of play-based learning:

Research tells us that children naturally explore and engage with content areas such as mathematics during free play,” says Clements. “So we know that, when they are playing, they are acting out the foundations of their lessons from the classroom.”

Results from pilot programs report that children achieve their learning goals beyond expectations, and teachers and parents have been surprised at how effectively the curriculum improves the children’s performances across all domains.

The C4L curriculum also includes:

  • Pre-K Teacher’s Handbook
  • Director’s Handbook for Pre-K or Principal’s Handbook for Pre-K
  • Pre-K Kit
  • Classroom Book Set
  • Formative Assessments
  • Online Portal, including how-to videos, professional development offerings, classroom management tools, and math games

*Farran, Lipsey, Watson, & Hurley, 2007.

** Ginsburg, Cooke, Leinwand, Noell, & Pollock, 2005

 

About Kaplan Early Learning Company

Kaplan Early Learning Company is based in Lewisville, North Carolina, and provides products and services that enhance children’s learning. Since 1968, the company has delivered innovative products and services that support educators and caregivers worldwide in the creation of quality learning environments.

Morgridge College of Education (MCE) Alumni and Community members gathered at Katherine Ruffatto Hall (KRH) on October 15, 2015 for the final Alumni Signature Event sponsored by the MCE Alumni Board. The event included an interview with Mark Twarogowski, MCE Alumni, PhD candidate, and current Headmaster of Denver Academy. Mark was interviewed by Robert Sheets, MCE Alumni and the first Director for the Colorado Council on the Arts and Humanities. The spirited interview included a conversation on the role a school’s architecture plays in fostering culture and how it affects student’s ability to learn which is the focus of Twarogowski’s current doctoral research.

The event concluded with the unveiling and dedication of the MCE Alumni Board Signature Event Honoree wall which features photos of the 17 individuals whom have presented at Alumni Signature events between 2007 and 2015. The Honoree wall is located on the 2nd floor of KRH and MCE invites anyone to stop by while visiting the college. The creation of this wall of portraits was inspired by the generosity of alumni Berwyn and Gail Davies.

MCE would like to extend a special thank you to all of our Alumni Signature Event Honored Guests.

Dr. Jerry Wartgow

Dr. Marion Downs

Dr. Camila Alire

John & Carrie Morgridge

Dr. Carolyn Mears

Dr. Gregory Anderson

Dr. Mary Gomez

Mindy Adair

Dr. Kristin Waters

Dr. Lucy Miller

Dr. Donna Shavlik

Senator Michael Johnston

Barth Quenzar

Wendy H. Davenson

Dr. Karen Riley

Mark Twarogowski

Trevista at Horace Mann

Trevista at Horace Mann

Jesús Rodriguez is the current elementary school principal of Trevista at Horace Mann in Denver Public Schools. Trevista is a school with turnaround status that met the expectations of the Colorado Department of Education’s school performance framework for the first time last spring under the leadership of previous principal LaDawn Baity. Baity, along with Rodriguez, is a graduate of the Morgridge College of Education’s (MCE) Educational Leadership and Policy Studies (ELPS) Ritchie Program for School Leaders. Rodriguez, who is also a current ELPS Ed.D. candidate at MCE, became principal of  Trevista at the end of the 2014-2015 school year, having  worked as the assistant principal at Trevista prior.

Rodriguez is dedicated to improving student performance at Trevista, and was recently featured in Chalkbeat Colorado (“Opening a new chapter, a Denver elementary school on the rebound changes its look and feel.”) The article illustrates the dramatic changes that have occurred under the leadership of Rodriguez and how these affect student culture.

This post is part of a series of stories recognizing MCE graduates during National Principals Month.

On September 25, 2015 Douglas H. Clements, Kennedy Endowed Chair in Early Childhood Learning, Executive Director for the Marsico Institute for Early Learning and Literacy, and Professor of Curriculum Studies and Teaching at the Morgridge College of Education, testified before members of Congress about early math education policy. Dr. Clements was invited by The Friends of the Institute of Education Sciences (IES) to present the research that he and Dr. Julie Sarama, Kennedy Endowed Chair in Innovative Learning Technologies and Professor of Curriculum Instruction at the Morgridge College of Education, have been compiling.

The briefing shed light on the role of IES and the important research it funds. The goal of the briefing was to inform policy makers on early math education so that they can make informed decisions when creating legislation related to early education and STEM learning. Topics included how young learners acquire mathematical knowledge, the impact of curricula and teaching approaches, and the effect of socio-economic background on math literacy. Other presenters included Hirokazu Yoshikawa, Ph.D from New York University, and Prentice Starkey, Ph.D from WestEd. The briefing’s principal Co-Sponsors included the American Educational Research Association, the American Psychological Association, the Society for Research in Child Development, and WestED.

Photo credit to National Science Foundation Education & Human Resources

Dr. Frank Tuitt is devoted to the examination and exploration of topics related to access and equity in higher education, including issues of race, Inclusive Excellence, and diversity in and outside the classroom from the purview of both faculty and students. As Senior Advisor to the Chancellor, Provost for Diversity and Inclusion, and Associate Professor of Higher Education at the Morgridge College of Education, his studies are centered on teaching and learning in racially diverse college classrooms, diversity, and organizational transformation.

On Tuesday, July 21, 201Dr. Frank Tuitt. Exemplifies Inclusive Excellence5, the American Council on Education released the report, Race, Class, and College Access: Achieving Diversity in a Shifting Legal Landscape at a release convening in Washington, D.C. As a member of the research oversight committee for the report, Dr. Tuitt contributed to a panel discussion at the event for a conversation on the report findings. During the final session of the day, focused on the connection between admissions and student success, he commented, “ We recognize our students, faculty, and staff come to us with a variety of experiences that are assets—not something that should be checked at the door—but that are valuable resources that will help them be successful and we find ways to help them leverage those rich assets to support their overall success.”

The report fosters a much-needed dialogue on how institutions can best respond to a shifting policy and legal landscape at a time when access to postsecondary education has never been more vital and our citizenry never so diverse. The researchers examine contemporary admission practices at four-year colleges and universities across a wide range of selectivity in the context of recent legal challenges to race-conscious admissions, including the pending U.S. Supreme Court case Fisher v. University of Texas at Austin. Among other findings, the authors examine the most widely used and effective diversity strategies; changes in admissions factors after the 2013 Fisher ruling and statewide bans on race-conscious admissions; and, the most sought after research and guidance given the current legal and political landscape.

The Rocky Mountain Prevention Research Center (RMPRC), under the leadership of Jini Puma, PhD, clinical assistant professor in Community and Behavioral Health and Research Methods and Statistics (RMS) Program graduate, has been awarded new funding from the Buell Foundation to expand the Culture of Wellness in Preschools Program (COWP). The expansion will include 20 additional preschools serving 1,240 children and 170 staff.

COWP works collaboratively with preschools to implement coordinated and comprehensive evidence-based activities aimed at increasing daily healthy eating and activity by preschool students, staff and parents. This new grant will expand COWP with a focus on outdoor playtime. COWP was also refunded by the Colorado Health Foundation in February for $1.4 million over the next 3 years and is now receiving on-going sustainability funds of $100,000 annually from Denver’s Great Kids Head Start. This is the first time that the Buell Foundation will be funding health promotion as part of their focus on positive youth development and  brings the funding for this year to over $2.1 million across COWP projects.


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