Intern: Ashley Bartlett, second-year master’s student in higher education

Employers: Arapahoe Community College: A two-year college in the greater Denver area  offering more than 100 degree and certificate programs.

Suitts Graduate and Alumni Career Center: Operated by the Daniels College of Business, this center offers opportunities for graduate students to explore career options, prepare for interviews, and advance professionally.

What She Did

Arapahoe Community College (ACC): I worked at ACC as an academic advising intern where I assisted with database management and academic advising for scholarship students in effort to increase retention and persistence of these students.

Graduate Intern at Suitts Graduate and Alumni Career Center: I provided career coaching for graduate and alumni students of the Daniels College of Business that included resume and cover letter assistance, job search strategies, and networking advice.

How her Internships Helped her Career

Due to my grad student schedule, I was actually able to accommodate both internships during the school year. My goal upon entering the Higher Education program at DU was to get a job in career services in the Denver area upon graduation, and I knew coming in that higher education in Colorado is a close-knit industry where everyone knows everyone. Keeping that inWordpress Quote (1)
mind, I was very intentional about seeking internships. I did informational interviews with directors at different types of institutions (community colleges, business schools, law schools, etc.) and discovered that certain types of institutions prefer you to have experience at an institution similar to theirs. That prompted me to seek out an internship at a community college so that I could diversify my resume. I also capitalized on my B.A. in business administration since so many business schools have their own career centers. Between each of these internships and my required fellowship, I was really able to take what I learned from the classroom into a real world setting. I also feel that my contributions in class were better informed due to my outside experience.

Advice She’d Give to DU Grad Students

Grad school provides you with the unique opportunity to be in a position where people want to help you and develop you. Get out there and meet the key players in your field early on, and make great relationships with them. The more fans you have, the more opportunities will come to you. Also, be open to new and relatable experiences you may have not considered before. Advocate for yourself, and find ways to make new opportunities.

Lastly, my taking advantage of multiple opportunities helped to substantially grow my network in a short amount of time. This networking certainly paid off. I had options in my career search, and have even been able to secure a position prior to graduation.

This blog is a part of the University of Denver Office of Graduate Studies blog series, True Stories. The purpose of the series is to share DU student internship experiences to help prepare students for their upcoming summer jobs/assistantships/internships. The last True Stories blog featured Ben Lampert, a  master’s student majoring in sport and performance psychology who interned at Rivermend Health Wellspring Camps.

FOX31 Denver featured Educational Leadership and Policy Studies graduate turned principal, Nickolas Dawkins, on Sunday 21, 2015. Dawkins is dramatically improving the quality of education students receive in Denver.

The true value of our Teacher Preparation Programs is the student’s immediate immersion into the classroom under the mentorship and guidance of seasoned teachers and MCE faculty. The Denver Teacher Residency Master’s DegreeTeacher Education Master’s Degree, and Dual Undergraduate-Graduate Degree in Teacher Education prepare students for the realities of the 21st-century classroom.

Career OPPORTUNITIES with RMS

A degree in Research Methods and Statistics from the Morgridge College of Education provides access to a variety of career opportunities. Hands-on learning experiences embedded in the program prepare our graduates to apply their skills in the fields of higher education, government, health, and beyond. Many of our graduates have excelled in their careers and now stand as leaders in their field.

FeatureD Alumni

Research Methods and Statistics Alumni. Where Are they Now_4Assistant Professor – Philip Osteen, Ph.D is currently employed by the Florida State University (FSU) College of Social Work. At FSU Dr. Osteen teaches general linear modeling in the College’s Ph.D program. Dr. Osteen, who has a background in Social Work, focuses his research on crisis intervention, culturally competent practice, LGBTQ, measurement development, mental health, Social Work education, and suicide prevention.

Research Methods and Statistics Alumni. Where Are they Now_1Director, Accountability & Research – Mya L. Martin-Glenn, Ph.D is responsible for District and state level assessments within Aurora Public Schools. She supervises educational research meets by meeting with district and building administrators on assessment issues, designing and conducting evaluations, developing assessment reports, and sharing assessment results.

Research Methods and Statistics Alumni. Where Are they Now_3Research Manager – Veronica A. Gardner, Ph.D works at D3, an international research firm where she leads, trains, and mentors a team of research analysts that manage public opinion surveys, monitor and evaluate projects, and monitor media research in various countries. Dr. Gardner oversees projects throughout the full research cycle, from contracting to research design.

Research Methods and Statistics Alumni. Where Are they Now_5Clinical Assistant Professor – Jini Puma, Ph.D teaches Research and Evaluation Methods courses at the University of Colorado Denver, Colorado School of Public Health. Dr. Puma also writes grants to fund her Culture of Wellness in Preschools (COWP) public health intervention program, oversees the implementation of the COWP intervention, advises students, and writes manuscripts.

Research Methods and Statistics Alumni. Where Are they Now_4 ( Michelle Vanchu_Orosco)Post-Doctoral Research Associate – Michelle Vanchu-Orosco, Ph.D, coordinates and runs activities necessary for the successful completion of the SSHRC-funded Partnership Grant. The project, entitled Digitizing the Wisdom of Our Elders: From Digital Storytelling to Life Learning Project, received the 1st Place Exhibits Session Award at Postdoctoral Research Day.

Research Methods and Statistics Alumni. Where Are they Now_2 (Morgan earp)Research Statistician – Morgan S. Earp, Ph.D works as a government employee for the Bureau of Labor Statistics Office of Survey Methods Research where she assesses non-response bias and measurement error. She also teaches courses in statistical analysis and quantitative research methods at George Washington University. Dr. Earp is an active member of the American Association for Public Opinion Research.

Inspired by  Dan Savage’s YouTube sensation; the It Gets Better Tour is a nationally renowned collaboration between the Gay Men’s Chorus of Los Angeles, Speak Theater Arts, and the It Gets Better Project. The Morgridge College of Education (MCE) invited the tour to our college to hold several events for MCE community Members, Local Elementary School Students, and the Greater Denver Community.

The week’s events included a morning session with students from the Ricks Center for Gifted Education and MCE Community members. In true Ricks’ spirit, students engaged in an array of difficult discussions about their own experiences with bullying. Discussions were interspersed with musical performances that livened the experience and had many participants clapping along.

Educators from across Denver participated in an evening session which included a panel discussion. Tour members presented counter-bullying techniques like their signature The It Gets Better World Cafe. World Cafés are developed in local, intimate venues, to facilitate  community dialogue which examines the LBGT experience.  Audience members were invited to attend the next Denver Café.

Two big themes included standing up for your peers when you see bullying and the impact that a single teacher can have on a student who is being bullied. MCE and the It Gets Better Tour are united in empowering educators to support children involved in these difficult encounters.

On Thursday April 9th the Morgridge College of Education hosted the Denver School of Science and Technology (DSST) Annual Technology Deep Dive. DSST boasts some of the state’s most impressive educational statistics including a 100% acceptance rate to 4-year colleges or universities over the last seven years for all of its graduates.

Attended by educators, MCE Faculty, and community members, the Deep Dive showcased how DSST uses data and technology to build some of Colorado’s most successful schools.  Leaders from DSST presented on many topics including the ways in which DSST faculty and staff use networks, technology, and data environments to empower students, families, teachers, and school leaders.

Innovators in the Field

Interested in becoming a librarian, archivist, or information professional? The Morgridge College of Education’s Library and Information Science Program can get you there. In a climate where information and cultural heritage professions are constantly changing, our faculty are focused on keeping pace with the latest technology and trends. Not only do faculty bring a wide array of experience, skills, and innovation, they connect students to the vibrant and engaged community of practitioners in the area.

Information is everywhere. Having a degree in Library and Information Science will open the doors to an almost infinite variety of professions. Technically-minded individuals have opportunities to work in the fields of web design, data curation, digital libraries, or digital archives. Those interested in connecting directly with people can find a place in community outreach, information literacy, youth librarianship, or reference. The career opportunities are limitless.

Graduates Leading Innovation

Library & Information Science at a Glance James RogersSenior Special Collection Librarian – James W. Rogers has many responsibilities at the Denver Public Library including managing the daily operations of the Western History/Genealogy Department, photo sales, reference desk, and WHG’s digital strategy.

Library & Information Science at a Glance Chris CoughlanInformation Architect – Chris Coughlan is an information architect for the digital strategy, design, and development agency Aten Design Group. Aten creates user-centered digital experiences for cause-driven organizations, such as Colorado Public Radio, UC Berkeley, Human Rights Watch, and the World Wildlife Fund.

Library & Information Science at a Glance Maria HuggerProduct Manager, Collection Development – Maria Hugger works for EBSCO Information Services as Product Manager of Collection Development tools for collections such as the H.W. Wilson Core Collections.

Library & Information Science at a Glance Natlia TingleAssistant Professor – Natalia Tingle is an Assistant Professor at the William M. White Business Library at the University of Colorado Boulder where she serves as a subject specialist for instruction and reference in the business disciplines.

Often new teachers enter their career excited and full of energy, but rapidly begin to feel like something is missing. Too quickly they feel like leaving. Is this you? Someone you know?

Paul michalec

Dr. Paul michalec

Early Career Teachers: Sustaining the Fire is an opportunity to join a community of other early career teachers to share stories, develop skills and provide support during this critical time of professional identity formation. The early years of teaching often follow a yearly pattern that starts with excitement in the fall and bottoms out in December with disillusionment followed by anticipation in the late spring. Most schools and school districts lack the capacity for helping teachers work through the learning associated with disillusionment and loss of heart. Consequently, many teachers exit the field of education before they have three years of experience. Under the guidance of Dr. Paul Michalec, you will learn both the latest research in the experiences of early career teachers, strategies and techniques for responding to the challenges, and participate in a community of fellow practitioners sharing stories of early career experiences.

The session will be held Wednesday April 8th, 2015 from 5:00 – 7:00 PM. It will be held in Ruffatto Hall, room 202, 1999 E. Evans Avenue, Denver CO 80208 and will cost $25.

We hope you will join us and continue your professional learning, transforming passion into purpose.

Educators gathered at MCE on Monday, March 23rd, to listen to Dr. Fredrick M. Hess discuss his soon to be released book The Cage-Busting Teacher. Dr. Hess, a graduate of Harvard University and director of Education Policy Studies at The American Enterprise Institute, is an iconic author on education policy and administration.

“Teachers tend to get stuck at policy, bureaucracy, and leadership” said Dr. Hess, who then went on to present a number of ways for teachers to proactively improve their schools and systems through interaction with administration and policy. The evening concluded with a lively discussion that focused primarily on Colorado’s education policy as participants discussed their own experiences, both positive and negative.

The Morgridge College of Education (MCE) has received a substantial donation in support of its Library and Information Science Program from Ruth D. Klein. The donation will go to scholarships for this year’s incoming Master’s students. Ms. Klein is a graduate of DU’s LIS Program and served as a librarian in the Denver Public Schools for over 30 years.

Ruth Klein was honored by the Morgridge College of Education and DU’s Office of Advancement at a luncheon on March 4th, where Dean Karen Riley (MCE) and Dean Nancy Allen (Anderson Academic Commons) joined LIS students and faculty members to thank Ms. Klein for her contributions to the field of library information science.

The Institute for the Development of Gifted Education (IDGE) is pleased to announce Dr. Julia Link Roberts as recipient of the 2015 Palmarium Award. She is the Mahurin Professor of Gifted Studies at Western Kentucky University as well as the Executive Director of The Center for Gifted Studies and The Carol Martin Gatton Academy of Mathematics and Science in Kentucky.

The Palmarium Award is awarded to the individual most exemplifying the vision of the Institute for the Development of Gifted Education. A vision of, “a future in which giftedness will be understood, embraced, and systemically nurtured throughout the nation and the world.”

Recipients demonstrate the Institute’s vision through understanding of giftedness in the areas of:

  • Practice by impacting graduate education, pre-service, and P-12 community
  •  Outreach through advocacy at a variety of levels (local, national, international)
  • Publications informing teachers, children, parents, policy makers, and academia
  •  Research influencing theory, practice, and policy

For the full article on Dr. Julia Link Roberts visit WKUNews.

The Marsico Institute for Early Learning and Literacy (MIELL) is assisting the North Dakota Department of Public Instruction (NDDPI) in conducting a state-mandated study. This study centers on the development, delivery, and administration of comprehensive early childhood care and early childhood education in North Dakota. Dr. Carrie Germeroth, Assistant Director of Research at Marsico and the project director, works closely with a State Advisory Committee to provide insight on early childhood needs. The Marsico study “has really given us a roadmap, I think last session we didn’t have enough information to really make some changes,” said Senator Michael Nathe in the Grand Forks Herald. The state funding would cover approximately half of the cost of pre-kindergarten education for an estimated 6,000 children through annual grants of $1,000 per student. “With just 36 percent enrollment among 3- and 4-year-olds, the state ranks fifth from the bottom in early childhood education,” said Kirsten Baesle, State Superintendent. Under the legislation, communities would have to organize coalitions of early childhood education providers, both public and private. Dr. Germeroth also works closely with the State Advisory Committee developing a state Early Care and Education Framework and Parent Brief to support further legislative efforts.

aSSURING a qUALITY eDUCATION

MCE’s Child, Family, & School Psychology (CFSP) Ph.D. and Ed.S. programs are both arccredited by the National Association of School Psychologists (NASP).

NASP accreditation is an important indicator of quality graduate education in school psychology, comprehensive content, and extensive and properly supervised field experiences and internships, as judged by trained national reviewers. In addition, a program attaining NASP approval allows for a streamlined process for program graduates to obtain the Nationally Certified School Psychologist (NCSP) credential.

“NASP program approval is your assurance that the key professional association in the field recognizes the content and quality of Morgridge’s CFSP PhD and EdS programs” said Cynthia Hazel, PhD (Associate Professor and Program Coordinator).

Our NASP Accredited Programs

Since joining the Morgridge College of Education faculty in 2011, Dr. Nicole M. Joseph, Assistant Professor of Curriculum and Instruction, advances Inclusive Excellence research and practice around issues related to access, equity and achievement for underrepresented students. Her work focuses particularly on social justice for African American females in math education. In addition to her research, Dr. Joseph is strongly committed to teaching, employing transformative practice to co-construct deep learning experiences for her students. Congratulations are in order; Dr. Joseph was recently awarded the 2014-2015 National Academy of Education/Spencer Postdoctoral Fellowship.

Dr. Joseph is currently working on a number of research projects. She is the lead co-author of a book with MCE alumna Dr. Chayla Haynes Davison and Dr. Floyd Cobb entitled, Interrogating Whiteness and Relinquishing Power: White Faculty’s Commitment to Racial Consciousness in STEM Classrooms, which seeks to link issues of inclusion to teacher excellence by illuminating the critical influence that racial consciousness has on the behaviors of white faculty in the classroom (Haynes, 2013). The important work specifically examines STEM classrooms because of the over saturation of white faculty teaching in STEM, in addition to the STEM system being a white institutional space that perpetuates hegemony, thereby negatively influencing racially minoritized students’ equitable outcomes. The book is scheduled for release in the spring of 2015.

In addition to finishing her book, Dr. Joseph continues her work on the mathematics education of Blacks during segregation from 1854 to 1954 through a University of Denver funded PROF grant. This study focuses on archival data collected from 25 Historically Black Colleges and Universities across 11 states from sources such as mathematics textbooks, mathematics faculty papers, institution catalogs, yearbooks, and school newspapers. This history project is now being funded by her National Academy of Education/Spencer Postdoctoral Fellowship.  Additionally, Dr. Joseph recently submitted an article to the Journal of Negro Education based on this work and is also working on turning this research into a book manuscript.

In the Fall 2014, Dr. Joseph began working with a University of Denver Interdisciplinary Research Incubator for the Study of (In) Equality (IRISE) post-doctoral fellow, Subini Annamma, to study race, class and gender inequalities in K-12 schools. Over the next two years, she and Dr. Annamma will be working together on research that focuses on these important areas.  Additionally, Dr. Annamma will offer a graduate course that will be cross-listed in education, social work, and law.

Dr. Joseph and Kate Crowe pose with 9News' TaRhonda Thomas

Dr. Joseph and Beverly Leali pose with 9News’ TaRhonda Thomas

As the founder of the Sistah Network, Dr. Joseph is committed to the experiences of Black women at DU. She is currently partnering with Kate Crowe, the Special Collections and Archives Curator to conduct oral histories of Black women alums from the University of Denver from the early 1950s to the present. These oral histories are important because they help to reconstruct a more complete picture of the student experience at the University  of Denver’s rich history. Dr. Joseph and Ms. Crowe will create a repository of these oral histories for future researchers who would like to study this area.  TaRhonda Thomas, from Channel 9 news recently did a story on this project, DU seeking out diverse history.

This week, Karen Riley, Ph.D, Dean of the Morgridge College of Education, testified at the State Committee on Education for House Bill 15-1001. The bill, which addresses distribution of money for scholarship programs that assist early childhood education professionals, did not appear to cover programs that train individuals in early childhood special education. “We have a shortage of individuals with credentials to work with very young children with special needs,” said Dean Riley. “Typically early childhood and early childhood special education programs are separate programs with different requirements and an inclusive measure would serve the broader community while remaining consistent with the intent of the measure.”


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