DENVER CO – The University of Denver (DU) Morgridge College of Education’s Educational Leadership and Policy Studies (ELPS) program has been named in the top 30 nationally ranked best Educational Administration and Supervisionprograms by US News and World Report’s 2020 rankings. Coming in at number 27, the coveted spot in the top 30 was officially announced last week.

“This is big for us,” said Morgridge Dean, Dr. Karen Riley. “We’ve worked hard to create a program where the leadership skills are transferrable in and out of the classroom. We are seeing transformative leaders who graduate and keep in contact with their class cohorts for support, collaboration, and continued education. It is a unique program and it’s an honor to be recognized.”

According to the ELPS department chair Dr. Susan Korach, the ELPS faculty and staff are honored to receive this recognition.

“It fuels our efforts to continually improve our preparation and support for leaders, scholars and researchers,” Korach said. “Our students and the communities, schools, and districts where they serve are the center of our work and this ranking is reflective of their leadership efforts to improve teaching and learning.”

Morgridge is in good company in the top spot, listed among Vanderbilt, Columbia, and Harvard’s Educational Administration programs. The education college as a whole also made the top schools list, ranked at number 134 out of 200 in the top graduate schools in education.

The U.S. News & World Report rankingsare based on two types of data: expert opinions about program excellence and statistical indicators that measure the quality of a school’s faculty, research and students. Rankings data come from statistical surveys of more than 2,054 programs and from reputation surveys sent to more than 22,018 academics and professionals. The most recent surveys were conducted in fall 2018 and early 2019.

About DU’s Morgridge College of Education (MCE):MCE is a graduate college of education dedicated to creating positive change by unleashing the power of learning. The college infuses social justice, diversity and inclusion across its 23 advanced degrees in higher ed, teacher prep, public policy, special ed, counseling psychology, research methods, and information science.

DENVER – The Center for Rural School Health & Education (CRSHE) at the University of Denver Morgridge College of Education has been funded by the Colorado Clinical and Translational Sciences Institute to create a taskforce to address and combat the growing youth mental health crisis. Called the Community-University Partnership (CUP), the taskforce is comprised of 11 individuals with expertise in the areas of San Luis Valley K-12 schools and mental health services, evidence-based practices to promote student health and wellness, community-based participatory research, culturally and linguistically responsive mental health services, adverse childhood  experiences, positive youth development, and resiliency. The goal is to create a community informed, data driven, evidence-based action plan that can be implemented across all 14 San Luis Valley school districts to improve the social-emotional health of all San Luis Valley K-12 students.

 

“I was thrilled to find out we were funded and couldn’t wait to share the good news with our San Luis Valley Community Advisory Board,” said Dr. Elaine Belansky, CRSHE director and lead academic partner from Morgridge College. “The board went through an extensive ‘Year of Learning’ process that culminated in a decision to establish an upstream approach to addressing adverse childhood experiences. While the community has many assets, it also faces challenges of poverty and opioid addiction. This grant gives us the opportunity to take an important next step in making sure students have the coping and life skills they need to be healthy and happy.”

 

The action plan will include strategies related to 1) professional development for teachers on trauma-informed instruction, self-care to avoid teacher burnout and compassion fatigue, and meeting mental health needs of students; 2) evidence-based practices to implement in schools such as social emotional learning curricula to build youth resiliency, communication skills, and positive self-esteem; 3) systems-level strategies to align, coordinate, and leverage resources across key partners; 4) strategies to address the mental health workforce shortage by increasing clinical services through innovative partnerships with universities. Once the action plan has been established, the taskforce will develop a separate grant proposal to implement.

 

The long-term goal is to equip teachers with the knowledge and skills they need to support children’s social-emotional needs in the classroom, increase mental health clinical services by finding creative ways for universities to partner with communities, and help children obtain the knowledge and skills they need to be healthy and happy individuals.

 

The taskforce will begin its work this summer.

 

Community Partner: Clarissa Woodworth, Operations Director of Center for Restorative Programs

Academic Researcher:  Elaine Belansky, Director of Center for Rural School Health & Education

Funding period:  May 1, 2019-April 30, 2020, Funded by the Colorado Clinical and Translational Sciences Institute

 

 

 

About DU’s Morgridge College of Education(MCE): MCE is a graduate college of education dedicated to creating positive change by unleashing the power of learning. The college infuses social justice, diversity and inclusion across its 23 advanced degrees in higher ed, teacher prep, public policy, special ed, counseling psychology, research methods, and information science.

Each year the Denver Business Journal (DBJ) chooses 40 professionals under 40 who are movers and shakers in the Denver community. These hardworking individuals are some of the brightest Denver has to offer and Morgridge is delighted to call one of our alumni a DBJ 40 Under 40 winner. Scott Laband, MA ’10, is the current president of Colorado Succeeds, a 501(c)(3) non-profit, nonpartisan coalition of business leaders focused on improving the state’s education system. Scott recently sat down to chat with us about his award, his time at Morgridge, and where he sees himself in the future.

Tell me about your time at Morgridge.

The Morgridge College of Education at the University of Denver is known for encouraging out of the box thinking and my time at Morgridge did not fall short of my expectations. I came to Morgridge at a time when I was making a seismic shift in my career, from corporate to nonprofit – with a stop in public service along the way. I was inspired, challenged, and met amazing people who are still engaged in the movement to improve our nation’s schools today.

Why did you choose a degree in higher education?

I remember it vividly. I’m the oldest of five children and was doling out advice to my siblings entering their adult life, encouraging them to follow their passions. While chating with my youngest sister about her college major, it struck me that I should take a dose of my own advice. In a matter of weeks, I quit my comfortable corporate job, found a new role as a Legislative Director with in the State Senate, and enrolled at Morgridge to study leadership and organizational change inside education.

Coming from a family of educators, I have immense respect and admiration for their radical commitment to the next generation.  It was important for me to understand how I could contribute and do my part. The Morgridge College helped me find my role. My focus then, and still is today, large-scale systems change to create educational experiences that work for all students.

This starts with understanding the diverse needs and interests of all learners and empowering eduators to address them in relevant ways. When we talk about great leaders, we talk about educators and we are committed to supporting them and clearing a path for them to succeed.

Did your degree help you in your career path?

Both personally and professionally. The professional growth is perhaps the most obvious through the expertise, networks, and educational thought-leaders I gained during my time at Morgridge. On a more personal level, I was able to fine tune my skills in time management and discipline as I suddently found myself reporting to one of the most prominent Senators in the Statehouse by day, pursuing a full time degree by night, and learning the ropes as a father for the first time. Talk about a growing opportunity!

What lead you to Colorado Succeeds?

Colorado Succeeds came as a welcomed and natural transition after my time at the Capitol. I was 2010 and I brought on as employee #2, with big expectations to meet. Succeeds was in its infancy, created by a coalition of passionate, prominent business leaders who wanted to exert their leadership and acumen to improving schools, ensuring all students benefit from the types of high-quality educational experiences they received. At the time, we were largely a policy and advocacy shop.

Nine years later, it’s fun to look back and see how we’ve evolved. We’ve all grown together – as a staff, as a membership, and as an incubator for innovation and employer-educator partnerships that are reimagining the learning experience. What led me to Succeeds is the same reason I’m still here today, nearly a decade later: I can be a social entrepreneur laser focused on impact, while reporting to a board comprised of wickedly-smart business executives who a deeply committed to this work.

How does it feel to be listed as one of Denver’s 40 Under 40?

It is humbling and a true honor and at the same time, I know that the reasons I’m being acknowledged are hardly my own to tout. The Board and team at Succeeds was just excited to hear the news and is equally deserving of the recognition. We’re all attending the award reception to celebrate together. It’s a great opportunity to step back, reflect, and toast to the journey.

What is next for your future?

I have never been more excited about the vision and trajectory of Colorado Succeeds. Our leadership is working to create agile learning pathways that respond to the diverse needs and interests of learners. Employers have an important role in coming together with educators to inform those pathways. We’re expanding beyond policy to incubate partnerships and direct philanthropy, putting both our network and money to work. Together, these 3 focus areas – policy, practice, and philanthropy – will increase student access to relevant and rigorous learning environments where they can acquire transferable skills and competencies that will help them achieve economic security and mobility regardless of where the future takes us.

 

 

The Office of the Daniel L. Ritchie Endowed Chair in Gifted Education at the Morgridge College of Education is pleased to announce Dr. Frank C. Worrell as recipient of the 2019 Palmarium Award, an annual award given to an individual who most exemplifies the vision of the Office of the Daniel L. Ritchie Endowed Chair in Gifted Education. The office seeks a future in which giftedness will be understood, embraced, and systemically nurtured. Recipients of the Palmarium Award demonstrate the vision through understanding of giftedness in the areas of:

  • Practice by impacting graduate education, pre-service, and P-12 community
  • Outreach through advocacy at a variety of levels (local, national, international)
  • Publications informing teachers, children, parents, policy makers, and academia
  • Research influencing theory, practice, and policy

“Through the generosity of the Considine Family Foundation, the Palmarium Award provides professional acknowledgment and tangible support to eminent leaders in the field of Gifted Education,” said Norma Hafenstein, the Daniel L. Ritchie Endowed Chair in Gifted Education. “We are pleased to recognize Frank for his visionary work in recognizing potential in gifted and talented youth and in advocating for populations frequently underserved.”

Worrell is a Professor in the Graduate School of Education at the University of California, Berkeley, where he serves as Director of the School Psychology Program, Faculty Director of the Academic Talent Development Program, and Faculty Director of the California College Preparatory Academy. He also holds an affiliate appointment in the Social and Personality Area in the Psychology Department, and was a Visiting Professor in the Faculty of Education and Social Work at the University of Auckland (2014–2017). His areas of expertise include at-risk youth, cultural identities, gifted education/academic talent development, scale development and validation, teacher effectiveness, time perspective, and the translation of psychological research findings into school-based practice. Worrell served as Co-Editor and Editor of Review of Educational Research from 2012 to 2016 and as a Member at Large (2016 – 2018) on the Board of Directors of the American Psychological Association (APA). He is a Fellow of the Association for Psychological Science, the American Educational Research Association, and five divisions of APA, and an elected member of the Society for the Study of School Psychology and the National Academy of Education. Worrell is a recipient of UC Berkeley’s Chancellor’s Award for Advancing Institutional Excellence (2011), the Distinguished Scholar Award from the National Association for Gifted Children (2013), the Distinguished Contributions to Research Award from Division 45 (Society for the Psychological Study of Culture, Ethnicity, and Race) of APA (2015), and the Outstanding International Psychologist Award from Division 52 (International Psychology) of APA (2018). He has ongoing international collaborations in China Ethiopia, Germany, Iran, Israel, Italy, Japan, New Zealand, Nigeria, Peru, Slovenia, Sweden, Turkey, and the United Kingdom.

Worrell will receive his award and present the lunchtime address at the 9th Annual Gifted Education Symposium and Conference, “Theory & Practice: Conceptual Foundations and Classroom Strategies in Gifted Education” at the University of Denver on Thursday, Feb. 6, 2019. Please visit the conference link for registration and other conference details. For more information about this award, visit the conference webpage.

The University of Denver (DU) Morgridge College of Education (MCE) Center for Rural School Health & Education (CRSHE) will be expanding its work in rural communities with the addition of a new grant-funded initiative through the Colorado Department of Education’s (CDE) Plan into Action Grants. CRSHE’s goal with this initiative is to create a robust rural school mental health workforce in order to meet the mental health needs of rural students and provide classroom teachers with the support they need by increasing the number of mental health professionals placed in rural schools. MCE will work with state and community partners in southeast Colorado to build and sustain a rural school mental health workforce that can alleviate some of the pressures classroom teachers face in trying to meet those students’ emotional needs. The University anticipates that teacher retention rates will increase as a result of teachers feeling more supported in the classroom.

CRSHE director, Dr. Elaine Belansky, has been working in rural schools in Colorado for 19 years. While new to DU, Belansky is not new to challenges faced by rural communities.

“I have been working with rural school districts since 1999 and what’s striking to me is that in the past few years, every rural school district our team works with has named student mental health as a top concern,” Belansky said. “We don’t have enough school mental health professionals to meet the needs of rural students and classroom teachers are under a lot of pressure to teach content and meet the mental health needs of their kids. This grant gives us an opportunity to address these challenges.”

The $123,950 grant will allow Belansky and her team to partner with the Colorado Rural Education Collaborative and two Boards of Cooperative Educational Services (BOCES) to create strategies aimed at increasing the school mental health workforce across underserved areas of the state. The grant consists of three components:

  • Conduct an immersion in Southeast Colorado for school mental health graduate students
  • Develop a statewide Professional Learning Community for school mental health professionals via ECHO DU
  • Create a hiring forecast that includes cost-effective, innovative strategies to meet rural school mental health workforce demands

The long-term goals and impact of the grant are to see an increase in the rural school mental health workforce, increased teacher retention rates, and increased mental health of rural students. The 12 month grant period begins fall 2018.

Dr. Doug Clements, Director of Marsico Institute for Early Learning at the Morgridge College of Education, University of Denver, has been appointed as one of 18 members of a new advisory panel created to encourage U.S. scientific and technological innovations in education, as authorized by the American Innovation and Competitiveness Act. Clements was chosen after extensive interviews and consideration of 500 other candidates by The National Science Foundation (NSF), in consultation with the Department of Education, NASA and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).


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