Graduation Regalia

Gowns & Robes

The academic gown is usually black and is worn at all levels of education. It is to be worn closed and zipped. The robe is often ankle- or mid-calf length.The Bachelor’s gown is the most simple; the Master’s gown typically has longer, oblong sleeves; and theDoctoral gown is more elaborate, made of velvet, and has three stripes on the bell-shaped sleeves that indicate the school/area of study.

Hoods

Hoods are conferred upon students when they graduate with a Master’s or Doctoral degree. They are made of the same material as the gown. The hood is3.5′ long (Master’s) or 4′ (Doctoral) and features a velvet trim that indicates the discipline of graduation.The lining of the hood indicates the colors of the college from where the student graduated.

Caps, Mortarboards & Tams

Caps and mortarboards also become more elaborate with more degrees. Bachelor’s and Master’s graduates have a flat cap with a tassel. The tassel starts on the right and graduates move it to the left once they receive their diploma (a good way to remember this is that they “left” their institution). A doctoral cap is known as a “tam” which is velvet; has four, six, or eight corners; and is floppier than the traditional cap.

Colors

The colors of hoods symbolize the department/discipline of graduation. Here are some common ones you might see:

  • Light blue – education, counseling
  • Citron (yellow) – social work
  • Dark blue – all Ph.D.
  • Purple – law
  • White – history, sociology
  • Gold – psychology
  • Crimson (dark red) – communication
  • Lemon – library science

Accessories

Graduates might wear other items with their graduation regalia, such as stoles, cords, medals, and medallions.

  • Academic stoles, which look like thinner, satin hoods, are decorative in nature and typically indicate membership in clubs and organizations.
  • Cords, or braided rope, are often worn to show academic achievement (e.g. summa cum laude).
  • Medals and medallions are bestowed upon faculty or students for important titles or positions (e.g. Chancellor,President, Valedictorian).

History

The history of the academic regalia we see today dates back to the 12th and13th centuries when colleges and universities in western Europe were first being founded. It was the traditional dress of the clergy and monks at the time who often conducted business in cold, unheated churches. Gowns were worn to keep warm and hoods, or skull caps, were used to cover shaved heads. Caps and gowns were seen as markers of privilege and distinguishment. The colors that we see today were implemented and standardized in the late 19th century in order to bring more uniformity to the ceremony following an increase in the number of college students.

Dear Morgridge College of Education Students, Faculty and Staff,

The Morgridge College of Education stands against hate and racism. As a community of individuals committed to social justice we are dedicated to going beyond words to take action. Over the past few weeks, leaders across the College have worked collaboratively to continue existing efforts and to initiate new efforts to affect change within the College, the academy and the broader community. The following action items represent the overall areas of focus for the College. These have been identified as tangible, actionable steps toward building awareness of and dismantling systemic and institutional forms of racism. We will be working together throughout the summer to create more granular programming and action steps under each.

  1. We will continue to review and amend our recruitment processes to increase the diversity of our faculty, student and staff representation at MCE.
  2. We will continue college-wide training on issues related to systemic racism, institutional racism, and intersystems approaches to address these enduring forms of racism and discrimination that have marked the history of education in the U.S.
  3. We will collectively engage in Summer reading of How to Be an Antiracist by Ibram X. Kendi, to be followed by programming and small group discussions throughout the upcoming academic year. We will be providing more information soon on how students can acquire a copy of the book from the College.
  4. We will provide additional support and training for faculty to re-examine their courses to ensure integration of inclusive and critical approaches to subject matter content and its application.
  5. We will work with COESA to develop student-based programming that addresses training and education on systemic and institutional forms of racism.
  6. We will continue leadership training for Chairs, Directors, and Deans on dismantling systems and policies that reproduce inequities in the College.

The list above is not exhaustive. We will add and update these action steps as we continue this important work. Further, we want to hear from you (e.g., what could we do differently, what more could we be doing, what shouldn’t we be doing, what needs to happen first before other actions). Consider sharing your thoughts using this anonymous survey by Friday, June 19.

Thank you,

Dean Karen Riley

Associate Dean Mark Engberg

Members of the Inclusive Excellence Committee

Members of the MCE Leadership Team

President and Vice President of the MCE COESA

The CASE Winter Leadership Conference, taking place Feb. 2-3, 2017, has a significant presence from students, faculty, and alumni from the Educational Leadership and Policy Studies (ELPS) department. Additionally, the Morgridge College of Education is a Bronze-level sponsor of the conference.

Congratulations to all ELPS faculty, students, and alumni presenting!

Faculty

Ellen Miller-Brown, Assistant Professor
Title:
Lessons from the Field: Fresh Research from Doctoral Candidates

Alumni

Dr. Tricia Johnson, Ed.D. Graduate, Vice President, Academic Affairs, Community College of Aurora
Title: Leading for Change: Developing Equitable College and Career Guidance Systems

Dr. Danny Medved, Ed.D. Graduate, Principal and Lead School Designer, Denver School of Innovation and Design, Denver Public Schools
Title: Enacting Vision and Navigating Change Case Study: A Technical Report to New School Designers and Stakeholders

Dr. Matthew Weyer, Ph.D. Graduate, Senior Policy Specialist, National Conference of State Legislatures
Title: The Every Student Succeeds Act and Redesignation: Implications for School Leaders

Students

Rana Razzaque, Ed.D. Student, Learning Partner, Social and Emotional Learning, Denver Public Schools
Title: The Enlightened Educator: Exploring the Influence of Mindful Self-Awareness on the Culturally Responsive Practices of Teachers

Lorna Beckett, Graduate Assistant and Ph.D. Candidate, University of Denver
Title: Predictors of Colorado Urban Principal Turnover

Co-Presentations

Rana Razzaque, Ed.D. Student, Learning Partner, Social and Emotional Learning, Denver Public Schools
Dr. Ellen Miller-Brown, Assistant Professor
Title: Leadership Matters: Leading for Civility, Cultural Responsiveness and Community Engagement


Dr. Doris Candelarie
, Clinical Assistant Professor
CJ Cain, M.A. Student
Theresa Gilbreath, M.A. Student
Title: Design Thinking for School Leaders

Inspired by  Dan Savage’s YouTube sensation; the It Gets Better Tour is a nationally renowned collaboration between the Gay Men’s Chorus of Los Angeles, Speak Theater Arts, and the It Gets Better Project. The Morgridge College of Education (MCE) invited the tour to our college to hold several events for MCE community Members, Local Elementary School Students, and the Greater Denver Community.

The week’s events included a morning session with students from the Ricks Center for Gifted Education and MCE Community members. In true Ricks’ spirit, students engaged in an array of difficult discussions about their own experiences with bullying. Discussions were interspersed with musical performances that livened the experience and had many participants clapping along.

Educators from across Denver participated in an evening session which included a panel discussion. Tour members presented counter-bullying techniques like their signature The It Gets Better World Cafe. World Cafés are developed in local, intimate venues, to facilitate  community dialogue which examines the LBGT experience.  Audience members were invited to attend the next Denver Café.

Two big themes included standing up for your peers when you see bullying and the impact that a single teacher can have on a student who is being bullied. MCE and the It Gets Better Tour are united in empowering educators to support children involved in these difficult encounters.


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