Kate Newburgh, a Ph.D. student in the Morgridge College of Education Curriculum and Instruction Program, is working with Eagle Valley Schools to design and implement curricula that reflect the skills needed in today’s world. Newburgh, who joined Eagle Valley Schools earlier this year, supports the district’s middle and high school English and Language Arts departments. Her curriculum development incorporates “performance tasks” supplementing traditional content to develop “global-ready skills,” a concept created by Harvard University professor Tony Wagner.

The performance tasks prompt students to create projects that have a real-life impact in their communities; elementary-school students are working to research and install “buddy benches” on their playground to address bullying. Additionally, a ninth-grade class creates podcasts to tell the story of a local hero. Projects still in the works include one seventh-grade class working on a lesson in identifying and examining stereotypes by studying slam poetry and writing their own, with the intent of sharing their work with the community.

Eagle Valley Schools will measure student engagement in the performance-oriented curriculum to continually assess how to improve and expand upon a system designed to prepare students for a modern, global, and connected society. Her work in the district is particularly important in regards to people development because of the need to support the region’s growing immigrant and refugee population in an area that is isolated from the rest of the state.

The Morgridge College of Education extends its heartfelt congratulations to Higher Education Ph.D. student Meseret Hailu, who received the Fulbright-Hays Doctoral Dissertation Award. Hailu will use the award to conduct a study examining gender inequality within science and technology in Ethiopia.

Prior to enrolling in the Ph.D. program, Hailu attended the University of Denver and Regis University for her Bachelor’s and Master’s degrees in biological and biomedical sciences. She has served as an affiliate faculty member at Regis University and as an Academic Fellow at College Track, and currently works as a Graduate Research Assistant to supplement her doctoral studies. Hailu’s research interests revolve around international education and gender equality in STEM fields, particularly for Black women.

Congratulations, Meseret!

Educational Leadership and Policy Studies (ELPS) Ph.D. student Isaac Solano was selected by the University Council for Educational Administration (UCEA) as a 2016-2018 Jackson Scholar. The Jackson Scholars Network provides students of color with opportunities for professional development, mentorship, and networking in order to elevate their careers in educational leadership.

Solano is thrilled to become a Jackson Scholar, saying that “various scholarship organizations have made it possible for me to continue my education up to a PhD. I am just so grateful for the unwavering and constant support I have from my DU family.” Solano’s mentor for the program is Dr. Julian Vasquez Heilig of California State University, Sacramento.

Solano will participate in professional development and networking opportunities designed to enhance his doctoral experience. He will represent the Morgridge College of Education (MCE)—along with fellow MCE student Rana Razzaque, 2015-2017 UCEA Jackson Scholar—at the UCEA Convention in November.

About the Jackson Scholars Program

The UCEA Barbara L. Jackson Scholars Network began in November 2003 after a vote of the members of the UCEA Plenum. The two-year program provides formal networking, mentoring, and professional development for graduate students of color intending to become professors of educational leadership.

UCEA facilitates the development of a robust pipeline of faculty and graduate students of color in the field of educational leadership. As a result, Barbara Jackson Scholars and Alumni enhance the field of educational leadership and UCEA with their scholarship and expertise.

We are excited to highlight Morgridge College of Education Higher Education PhD student Delma Ramos. Delma focuses on social justice in higher education and explores systems of access and opportunity for underserved populations that stem, in part, from her experience as a first generation student. Her inspiring scholarship has led to a variety of opportunities including a summer associate position at the American Council on Education Center for Policy, Research, and Strategy! Below Delma shares her professional experience and advice:

Current research

I have been involved in collaborative projects guided by both qualitative and quantitative methodologies. Currently, I am participating in a study that explores the transition to college of low-income and first generation families and the systems institutions have in place to determine their involvement in their children’s college experience. Another project examines the academic trajectories of low-income, first generation women of color in racialized and sexualized academic settings.

Most recently I was invited to collaborate in two studies one which seeks to understand the role that low-income and families of color play in cultivating their children’s educational aspirations and ideologies, and one that involves the construction of a series of measures of Funds of Knowledge. I am also currently working with the Colorado Department of Higher Education on projects related to developmental education and performance metrics.  This summer, I look forward to joining the American Council on Education Center for Policy, Research, and Strategy in DC as a graduate summer associate exploring federal policies impacting higher education. Findings from at least two of the projects have been widely disseminated at forums including ASHE, NASPA, and AERA. Several publications that have emerged from this work are currently in the pipeline.

Collaborators

Most of the research inquiries I have participate(d) in are collaborations with various researchers.  In these settings, I play different roles as part of the research process from proposal development to finding dissemination and the creation of recommendations. These partnerships have taken place within the University of Denver, primarily with my academic advisor Dr. Judy Marquez Kiyama and with colleagues from outside organizations including the University of Missouri, the University of California-Los Angeles, Teachers College, the Denver Scholarship Foundation, RAND Corporation, and the Education Commission of the States.

Initial Inspiration

My research interests include access, retention, and graduation from higher education institutions, with an emphasis on underserved populations. Additionally, I focus on the assessment of programs with similar foci and on issues pertaining to educational quality and inclusive pedagogies in higher education, with a special interest in measure development. Philosophically, my research agenda is driven by my passionate commitment to social justice and my vision for a more inclusive and accessible higher education system. My research interests are further strengthened by my background as a first generation student and my exposure to scholars who study inequities in higher education as influenced by economic, social, and political contexts.

Biggest Challenge

As a woman of color, my biggest challenge has been to identify support systems that strengthen my ability to persist and succeed in my program at DU. My support network is composed of colleagues within and outside of DU as well as family and friends outside of Higher Ed.

Research Advice: Make Connections

I have found networking to be a very effective tool to access a wide array of research and other professional development opportunities.  Reach out to those people you would like to work with, you’ve got nothing to lose!

NOTE: This blog post is being featured from the official blog of the University of Denver’s Office of Graduate Studies.

Research Methods and Statistics Ph.D Candidate Priyalatha Govindasamy received top award at the University of Denver Research and Performance Summit (DURAPS) on January 29. Govindasamy presented her research at the DURAPS poster session highlighting the software package that she has been developing with Antonio Olmos, Ph.D and Kellie Keeling, Ph.D.

Govindasamy explained that “effect size is the key to conducting meta-analysis, but not all the studies report empirical information required for computing effect sizes.” Studies will often report different types of statistical information that require different mathematical algorithms to compute effective sizes. To overcome this hurdle, Govindasamy and her supporting faculty developed the Effectssizecalculator Package in R for Meta-Analysis. This package was designed to compile all different mathematical algorithms and estimate the effective sizes into one module and leverages the R statistical analysis software.

The Morgridge College of Education would like to congratulate Miss Govindasamy on her award and recognize her fascinating research.

Keelie Sorel, a master’s candidate in the Higher Education department (HED) at the Morgridge College of Education, has been selected as one of two Distinguished Graduate Community Leaders for December 2015. The masters in HED empowers students to explore topics of access, equity, and inclusive excellence, and Keelie has developed a critical lens she uses to examine the effects of systemic inequity in education. She is committed to addressing these concerns through merging theory and practice.

At DU, Keelie serves as the program coordinator of the Social Justice Living and Learning Community, as a graduate assistant in the office of Student Outreach and Support and as an apartment fellow in Housing and Residential Education – and she loves it all. In each position, she has the opportunity to work with dedicated and passionate members of the DU community. Through her engagements, she works to support the holistic development of the students she works with while engaging with the larger community to support DU’s focus on inclusive excellence.

In that vein, she is eagerly planning a variety of events to support DU as we engage in equity work on our campus; she is working with the Colorado Women’s College to host a LunaFest film screening which is a series of short films directed and filmed by women about women’s issues, planning the fifth annual Social Justice Colloquium, which unites members of the community to engage in meaningful conversations that advocate for societal change, and will present about the need for interfaith cooperation at DU’s Diversity Summit this January.

She is incredibly grateful to be a part of the DU community and is honored to engage with peers, faculty, professional staff and students that are committed to making positive change in our communities. For more information about any upcoming events or to collaborate in the future, you can email her at keelie.sorel@du.edu.

DGCLA winners are selected through a peer-nomination process. To nominate a colleague, email du.gsgs@gmail.com with a 250-500 word statement describing why the nominee deserves to be an DGCLA winner.

Good day gold star 2We’d like to send a special congratulations to recent Teacher Education Program (TEP) graduate, Nina Jarnot. Nina has bas been awarded the Fox31 Good Day Gold Star Award, by Fox31 Denver. This monthly award goes to teachers who go above and beyond their call of duty.

With one week to go before the start of the 2014/2015 school year, Coyote Creek Elementary School in Highlands Ranch, CO, was in need of a second grade teacher. Nina quickly arrived to the rescue. She interviewed in the morning and by afternoon received a callback from administrators offering her the job, “It was a quick turnaround, but I was really thankful and excited,” Nina explains. The Good day gold star 3administrators aren’t alone in their approval of the new second grade teacher expresses one parent, “With her youth and enthusiasm, I think it really shines through, and I just think she’s a great asset to the school.”

The Morgridge College of Education and Teacher Education Program are proud of our very own, Nina Jarnot!

To see the Fox 31 segment highlighting Nina, follow this link:  http://www.covideo.com/p.php?s=51302bcd8b

If I had it to do all over again, I wouldn’t change a thing.

Like many twenty-somethings fresh out of undergrad, I landed in a position that felt more like a career than not, but certainly didn’t fulfill an all-encompassing life purpose. I was simply happy to be working in a position I enjoyed, not thinking too much about the next steps in my career path. I was fortunate to develop experience as a sales manager with a large and reputable company, which would later prove to be invaluable in my career change. But, as I eventually realized that particular job was not going to lead to a place of lasting interest to me, I had to decide how I was going to use the skills I had gained to work my way toward something more fulfilling.

A part time position at a public library lead me to discover something about myself. Whether it would be in libraries or another type of organization, I knew that I needed to pursue something that felt purposeful to me.

I decided it was important to obtain a Library Information Science degree, which would provide me with a basis of knowledge for a library position. I didn’t have a great deal of experience working in libraries, and felt that this would help prepare me for the type of work I was excited to begin doing.

I applied to a handful of LIS programs, and at the top of my list was the University of Denver and Morgridge College of Education’s LIS program. I wanted to be in Colorado if possible, and I wanted a program that would offer an in-person academic experience. Networking and learning from professionals face to face was one of my priorities, and DU delivered.

I was able to learn from many different professionals working in the field locally. The in-person program provided me with a variety of hands-on, practical experiences that boosted my knowledge and local support system. I graduated with my MLIS and a job in public libraries at the end of 2 years. And, during that time, I discovered a particular interest within libraries and non-profits I wouldn’t have known existed without going through the LIS program within Morgridge.

With the many opportunities the program led to, I discovered evaluation, analysis, and assessment in libraries and non-profits. The work is an excellent match to my passion that was there before I even knew what to do with it. While completing the LIS program, I became familiar with the Research Methods and Statistics program in MCE, and it proved to be the perfect avenue to continue my studies and deepen my focus in my chosen field. I’m completing my first year in the RMS doctorate program now, while continuing to work in public libraries, which will inform my work in research to come.

The faculty in MCE have been continuously supportive and steadfast in assisting me in reaching my goals. I’m continually challenged to think about my path, the steps I’m taking to get there, and how this is fulfilling my goal and professional purpose. My time working on my graduate studies at MCE has certainly shaped me as a professional, as an individual, as well as a seeker of education. Community and education is the thread of passion that links all MCE graduate students together. I’ve discovered that, as varied as our careers and interests are, our common goal is to do meaningful work in our fields.

 

For the first time ever, the DU ASIS&T student chapter was selected as a recipient of the ASIS&T (Association of Information Science & Technology) Student Chapter of the Year award for 2013. This award is given to student chapters to recognize their participation and contributions to ASIS&T and the advancement of information science. The University of Denver’s Library and Information Science (LIS) program supports multiple student chapters that aim to build skills and grow together professionally. The DU ASIS&T group primarily focuses their attention on introducing and furthering knowledge of LIS technologies to students in the field.

According to the Chapter Assembly, Association for Information Science and Technology, DU was chosen because “for a chapter of its size, the student chapter at the University of Denver is extremely active. Among the particularly noteworthy activities of this chapter are the number and quality of local events, the frequency and constancy of communication with its membership, the oversight and concern for local chapter finances and the quality administration provided by the officers. The chapter offers many diverse and interesting activities and has attempted to work with other organizations. It has also shown creative use of social media as communication tools. They not only have a well-maintained organization, but also clearly articulated future plans.”

During the 2012-2013 school year, the group recruited professionals to present short 30-minute talks, called TechBytes, to students. Some of these presentations included Jamie LaRue on the Future of Ebooks in Libraries, Alex Martinez on the Information Architecture of DU’s VideoManager, and Megan Kinney on using Drupal in Libraries. In addition, they planned and executed a full-day Technology Bootcamp. In an attempt to collaborate with students in other programs at the Morgridge College of Education, the group asked COESA (College of Education Student Association) to co-sponsor the event and invited all students in the college to attend. The 37 students that attended the event attended 4 sessions from DU professors and DU ASIS&T Officers throughout the day with topics ranging from Digitization to Visual Programming Language to Creating Community with Social Media.

Finally, chapter members helped with two panel presentations, one on web services librarianship and one on getting hired as a professional librarian. In addition to DU LIS students, individuals from the local community were invited to attend. Both events were a huge success and provided great career information. In order to publish these events, the group needed a robust web platform; therefore, members created a new chapter website, documented policies and procedures, and started a video archive of the recorded TechBytes.

Officers for the 2012-2013 Board:

Christine Coughlan, Chair

Lindsay Roberts, Vice-Chair

Jules Robinson, Treasurer

Josh Davies, Co-Program Director and Secretary

Julia Havelick, Web Content Manager

Kathleen Carothers, Co-Program Director

Rebecca Bolger, Marketing Director


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