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This week, Karen Riley, Ph.D, Dean of the Morgridge College of Education, testified at the State Committee on Education for House Bill 15-1001. The bill, which addresses distribution of money for scholarship programs that assist early childhood education professionals, did not appear to cover programs that train individuals in early childhood special education. “We have a shortage of individuals with credentials to work with very young children with special needs,” said Dean Riley. “Typically early childhood and early childhood special education programs are separate programs with different requirements and an inclusive measure would serve the broader community while remaining consistent with the intent of the measure.”

Read the Bill Here

Dr. Sam Museus exemplifies Inclusive Excellence through his scholarly work. His recent project, the Culturally Engaging Campus Environment (CECE) Project utilizes the CECE model, which investigates the impact of campus environments on diverse student populations. A major goal of the project is to create conditions that are conducive for a diverse college student body to thrive. When assessing a culturally engaging campus environment there are nine characterizing indicators: Cultural Familiarity, Culturally Relevant Knowledge, Cultural Community Service, Cultural Validation, Meaningful Cross-Cultural Engagement, Collectivist Cultural Orientations, Humanized Educational Environments, Proactive Philosophies, and Holistic Support.

Natasha Saelua, Raquel Wright-Mair, Dr. Sam Museus, Varaxy Yi

The CECE Project has deep association with the Morgridge community. Serving on the CECE Project advisory board is Dr. Frank Tuitt, Associate Provost for Inclusive Excellence and Associate Professor of Higher Education. Also contributing are, Dr. Judy Marquez Kiyama, Assistant Professor of Higher Education, and Dr. Ryan E. Gildersleeve, Associate Professor of Higher Education, who work as affiliated scholars on the project.  Three current Morgridge College of Education students serve on Dr. Museus’ research team, Natasha Saelua, Raquel Wright-Mair and Varaxy Yi.

Dr. Museus is an Associate Professor of Higher Education at Morgridge, Asian American and Pacific Islander Research Coalition (ARC) fellow, and Director of the CECE Project at DU. He earned his PhD from the Pennsylvania State University, and served as a faculty member at the University of Massachusetts Boston, University of Hawaii at Manoa, and Nagoya University in Japan, before becoming a faculty member at the University of Denver Morgridge College of Education in the fall of 2013. His scholarship focuses on “understanding the racial, cultural, and structural factors that affect the experiences and outcomes of diverse populations in higher education.”  Dr. Sam Museus is an accomplished author, having produced over 100 publications, many in top-tier peer-reviewed academic journals. He has authored numerous books, including his forthcoming book The New Majority and Higher Education: A Synthesis of Research on College Students of Color. To learn more about Dr. Museus and his work in Inclusive Excellence, please check out his portfolio below.

On January 14th, MCE held Colorado’s first and only public screening of the documentary “TEACH”. Over 200 educators and community leaders participated in the event which concluded with a panel discussion hosted by MCE Faculty member Paul Michalec, PhD, Program Coordinator and Clinical Professor for the Curriculum Studies and Teaching program.

Four of the Denver teachers and building leaders featured in the film were invited to be part of the panel, including Matt Johnson, MCE alum from the Denver Teacher Residency Program. During the discussion, Michalec quoted a stunning statistic that over 50 percent of new teachers will leave the education field within five years of beginning their careers. Why would teachers continue to teach despite an overwhelming number of obstacles stacked against them? Johnson, teacher at McGlone Elementary, explained that the students are his reason for continuing, a sentiment echoed by others. Lyndsay Young, teacher at MLK Early College, expressed that many students have never known a high school graduate and need a constant driving force in order to succeed. She saw herself as that force.

Carrie Morgridge, of the Morgridge Family Foundation, asked the panel, “What can [we]…do to help improve the system for you?” The panel’s overwhelming response was that teachers could be better prepared for these struggles if colleges of education provided more opportunities for their students to gain hands-on experience. “We need more forums between professors, teachers, and working practitioners,” said Suzanne Morey, Principal at McGlone Elementary School.

The event was featured in the DU Clarion. MCE will continue to drive critical conversations about teaching and teachers. Stay tuned for more events and opportunities to engage.

12 Jan / 2015

2014 A Year In Review

2014 was an eventful year for the Morgridge College of Education. From the introduction of new leaders to exciting student opportunities; we are excited to share with you some of our favorite moments of 2014.

Morgridge College of Education community members had the unique opportunity to ask new University of Denver Chancellor, Dr. Rebecca Chopp, questions about higher education, inclusive excellence, technology, and community building. The video series Chatting with Chopp features Chancellor Chopp as she answers questions posed by the DU Community.

Chancellor Chopp brings a wealth of experience to DU.  Most recently, she served as the president at Swarthmore College in Pennsylvania. In addition to her advanced administrative roles at numerous institutions, Chancellor Chopp is a widely published author and editor. In 2013, she co-edited the book Remaking College: Innovation in the Liberal Arts. The Morgridge College of Education is excited to share our opportunity to Chat with Chopp.

Watch the video above to learn more about Chancellor Chopp’s perspective on higher education.

Morgridge College of Education faculty member, Dr. Douglas Clements, sat down with NPR Morning Edition to discuss Why Math Might be the Secret to School Success. Across the country, enhancing the education of young children has been a major area of focus from academia to politics. This podcast focuses on Building Blocks, a math curriculum developed by Dr. Clements and Dr. Julie Sarama.Currently, in New York City, a $25 million study is collecting evidence on ways to effectively raise educational outcomes for children in poverty. Building Blocks is one math curriculum being tested in the study. Dr. Clements and Dr. Sarama believe that math may be key to increasing educational outcomes.

The NPR Morning Edition podcast was released a day prior to the December 10, 2014, White House Summit on Early Childhood Education. Morgridge faculty are at the forefront of the conversation of early childhood learning. Their work is pushing the envelope on how teachers engage and promote educational outcomes for future generations.

Listen to the NPR podcast here

The University of Denver Morgridge College of Education (MCE) is screening the film TEACH by Davis Guggenheim, on Wednesday, January 14, 2015. Teach follows the struggles and triumphs of America’s education system through the eyes, minds and hearts of its most essential resource: teachers.

The film is hosted by Queen Latifah and directed by Oscar®-winning filmmaker Davis Guggenheim, who also created the documentary, Waiting for “Superman.” Guggenheim focuses on how to develop and retain great teachers in the United States; Morgridge’s Teacher Preparation Programs (TPP) are a part of this movement. A  Morgridge Alum, Matt Johnson, is featured in the film.

The screening is being held for educators from across the Denver metropolitan area. It will also feature a special Q&A session with two of the film’s featured teachers, Matt Johnson (McGlone Elementary School-Denver) and Lindsay Chinn (MLK Early College-Denver), as well as an administrator from each school. Because we’ve had such a positive response from community members/educators, there will be a separate screening for MCE students, faculty and staff.

TEACH by Davis Guggenheim

TEACH by Davis Guggenheim

The 2014, Students of Color Reception: Celebrating a More Inclusive College was a success. Despite bitterly cold temperatures (day high of 39°, and 19° at the start of the event) the fifth annual installment of the event saw increased attendance from the past couple years, with nearly 70 guests joining Morgridge faculty, staff and a student panel. Beginning the night with delightful hors d’oeuvres, prospective students were introduced to current students and faculty to hear more about Morgridge and learning opportunities within the college. Current Higher Education Masters student, Ana Ramirez, spoke of the event saying, “It was a great opportunity to meet other individuals within the Morgridge College of Education and share my experience with prospective students.”

Guests at Morgridge Students of Color Reception

Guests at Morgridge Students of Color Reception

Associate Provost for Inclusive Excellence and Associate Professor of Higher Education at Morgridge, Dr. Frank Tuitt, was the event facilitator for the evening. He spoke to the ongoing need for the college to utilize Inclusive Excellence pedagogy, in order to create equitable education opportunities for all students, specifically students of color. Dr. Tuitt then introduced a panel of current and former Morgridge students of color, to speak about their experiences as students of color on the predominantly white campus of the University of Denver. The panel spoke at length about the investment of the college’s faculty in the success of students of color, both emotionally and academically. There was much praise by the panel on the cohort model as an aid in confronting the challenges that come with being a grad student (e.g. balancing work/social life, having children, the substantial school-workload). Financial resources on campus was a topic of great interest by many of the prospective students. There was an echoed sentiment of the panels’ initial perceptions of the University of Denver being that of a private school with excessive tuition prices; upon acceptance to their respective programs and further conversations with different departments on campus, they discovered the multitude of assistantship, fellowship, and scholarship opportunities to help fund their education.

The event was impactful. Prospective and current students were able to share their stories and engage in conversations with regard to the meanings of their journeys in and through higher education.  The night culminated with panel member, Dr. T. Lee Morgan’s plea to diversify the makeup of the campus and bring voice to communities of color, “If we are going to change the diversity of DU, of Morgridge, we need you here. You have valuable experiences that no one else can bring to the table.”

Thank you to all who attended and supported the Students of Color Reception, and a special thank you to Dr. Frank Tuitt and the panel members:

  • Casey Crear, Curriculum and Instruction PhD (Current Student)
  • Dr. T. Lee Morgan, Educational Leadership and Policy Studies PhD (Alum)
  • Raquel Wright-Mair, Higher Education PhD (Current Student)
  • Ruby Lopez, Teacher Education Program MA (Alum)
  • Hazuki Tochihara, Early Childhood Special Education MA (Current Student)
  • Jamie Kawahara, Child Family and School Psychology EdS (Current Student)

The Morgridge College of Education, Educational Leadership and Policy Studies (ELPS) program at the University of Denver is launching a unique partnership with Teach For America – Colorado.  One of an elite few hybrid programs Executive Leadership for Successful Schools (ELSS) brings together graduate school faculty, local principals and educational organizations.  The focus of this collaboration is to infuse Colorado with transformational leaders from across the country. A highly sought after placement, top Teach For America alumna will be selected from a competitive pool of applicants to participate in the TFA ELSS cohort of the Educational Leadership and Policy Studies program at the Morgridge College of Education.  Students will collaborate with exceptional faculty as they prepare to become courageous, visionary and transformative school leaders.  In an innovative hybrid teaching environment, students will work online throughout much of the program, but will have the opportunity, via Colorado Teach For America funding, to travel to Denver multiple times over the course of the program.  Once in Denver, students will visit schools in Denver Public Schools and shadow principals on Friday and attend full-day workshops with local aspiring school leaders at the Morgridge College of Education.

The exciting partnership blends the goals of Teach For America – Colorado to be a catalyst to help create transformational classrooms and schools for all kids with the Morgridge College of Education’s tradition of providing purposeful in-context learning experiences that help to transform people, communities and the world.  The Educational Leadership and Policy Studies (ELPS) program has been awarded the 2014 UCEA Exemplary Educational Leadership Preparation Program Award by the University Council for Educational Administration (UCEA). This award showcases institutions that benefit children and schools through advancing the preparation and practice of educational leaders.  The ELPS – Teach For America – Colorado partnership is another example of the many ways in which the Morgridge College of Education is an innovative leader working to transform people, communities and the world.

It is every child’s right to have a transformational leader in every school and every classroom — this video will show you what happens when transformational leaders create strong cultures in their schools, and the lasting impact these people have on our students.

This video tells this story through the lens of Educational Leadership & Policy Studies Graduate & DPS Principal, Nick Dawkins, who was recognized for excellence by the DPS Foundation.

Karen Riley - Desk

Dr. Karen Riley

Multi-site project will establish new tests that will track improved thinking and problem-solving skills in people with fragile X, Down syndromes, and other intellectual disabilities

Researchers with The Morgridge College of Education at The University of Denver are partners in a multi-site project that will develop and evaluate tests designed to measure and track changes in the cognitive functioning of people who typically are difficult to assess accurately. The research will be funded through a new, five-year, $3.2 million grant from the National Institutes of Health (NIH).

Investigator Karen Riley, Dean and Associate Professor, The Morgridge College of Education; Elizabeth Berry-Kravis, Associate professor,  Rush University Medical Center, Chicago; David Hessl, Professor, UC Davis Mind Institute; and Richard Gershon, Associate Professor, Northwestern University School of Medicine will all participate in this ground breaking research.

“The importance of appropriate outcome measures is foundational for intervention research. This project provides an opportunity for The University of Denver to collaborate with national leaders in the field and to partner with researchers at The Children’s Hospital, including Dr. Nicole Tartaglia in the Child Development Center and Dr. Fran Hickey in the Anna and John J Sie Center for Children with Down syndrome. It also provides a unique research opportunity for our students and builds capacity within our community to support children and their families with neurodevelopmental disorders,” said Dean Riley.

The tests will eventually be used to ascertain the effectiveness of medications and other treatments, specifically for people with fragile X and Down syndromes and other intellectual disabilities. Fragile X and Down syndromes are among the leading causes of intellectual disability in the United States and around the world. Fragile X syndrome also is the leading single-gene cause of autism spectrum disorder.

Often new teachers enter their career excited and full of energy, but rapidly begin to feel like something is missing. Too quickly they feel like leaving.

Is this you? Someone you know?

Paul Michalec

Dr. Paul Michalec.

Early Career Teachers: Sustaining the Fire is an opportunity to join a community of other early career teachers to share stories, develop skills and provide support during this critical time of professional identity formation. The early years of teaching often follow a yearly pattern that starts with excitement in the fall and bottoms out in December with disillusionment followed by anticipation in the late spring. Most schools and school districts lack the capacity for helping teachers work through the learning associated with disillusionment and loss of heart. Consequently, many teachers exit the field of education before they have three years of experience. Under the guidance of Dr. Paul Michalec, you will learn both the latest research in the experiences of early career teachers, strategies and techniques for responding to the challenges, and a community of fellow practitioners sharing stories of early career experiences.

Sessions will be held the first Wednesday of each month, beginning December 3, 2014 from 6:30- 8:00 PM The session will be held in Ruffatto Hall, Boardroom (off the main lobby), 1999 E. Evans Avenue, Denver CO 80208 and will cost $150, with students and multiparty sign ups receiving a discounted price of $75.

We hope you will join us and continue your professional learning, transforming passion into purpose.

Renew your Teaching -

Dr. Patton O. Garriott joined the Morgridge College of Education as an Assistant Professor in Counseling Psychology in 2012 after receiving his Ph.D. in Counseling Psychology from the University of Missouri and completing his pre-doctoral internship at the University of Texas at Austin Counseling and Mental Health Center. Dr. Garriott’s work focuses on those who are underserved, underrepresented, and excluded in higher education and specific career domains. He is currently a Co-Investigator on a $1,491,909 National Science Foundation (NSF) grant that will examine the persistence of women and Latinas/os in engineering. Dr. Garriott teaches several courses in the Master’s and Doctoral program in Counseling Psychology, including Multicultural Counseling, Ethics and Research seminars. He is a strong believer in mentorship and providing students with opportunities to “learn by doing.”

As the Director of the Career and Social Attitudes Lab, Dr. Garriott and his research team are working on several projects. His most recent work has focused on first-generation college students’ academic and career development as well as students of color in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) fields. Within the former domain, Dr. Garriott is examining predictors of first- and non-first-generation college students’ academic and life satisfaction. Given recent increases in first-generation college students’ attendance at institutions of higher education and their disproportionate non-persistence rates, this research could have implications for ensuring the success of this underserved student group. Dr. Garriott’s research in the area of STEM careers has focused on prospective first-generation college students as well as Mexican American high school and college students. The goal of this line of research is to help end the disproportionate overrepresentation of whites and males in growing occupational sectors that offer opportunities for social mobility. In addition to uncovering pathways to success for underrepresented groups, Dr. Garriott also believes in the necessity of interrogating privilege to foster social change. His research in this area has examined the efficacy of various approaches to multicultural education among white college students and explanatory mechanisms by which they work (e.g., guilt). Dr. Garriott and members of his research lab have been successful publishing their research in peer-reviewed journals as well as delivering presentations at national conferences.

In the future, Dr. Garriott plans to investigate help seeking behaviors among historically underrepresented students in higher education as well as socioeconomically distressed individuals. He continues to have an active research lab of around 10-15 Master’s and Doctoral students and welcomes student interest in research. Dr. Garriott is also working in collaboration with faculty from Higher Education and Sociology as well as the DU Center for Multicultural Excellence to qualitatively examine student perceptions of campus climate at DU. He hopes this work can have an impact at the macro level and inform institutional practices around inclusion and equity.

Dr. Patton Garriott - Portfolio

The Morgridge College of Education at the University of Denver is hosting its annual Students of Color Reception.

We are Celebrating a More Inclusive College. The Students of Color Reception: Celebrating a More Inclusive College allows us to recognize the ways in which our students of color and faculty are working to be transformational leaders. With a highlight on the student experience, prospective students and the greater Denver Metro area community share in an opportunity to explore the Morgridge College, including accessibility of academic programs, services and financial aid.

We would love for you to join us and see some of the amazing work in which our college is involved. This is a chance for prospective students of color to engage in a welcoming atmosphere, and see how a diverse, inclusive and innovative environment drives our commitment to social justice.

For more information call: (303)871-2509 and click here to RSVP.

Also, visit our Facebook page.

 

Morgridge College of Education’s Teacher Education Program (TEP), was recently featured in the September 24, 2014, edition of  La Voz, “Colorado’s #1 Hispanic-Owned Bilingual Publication.” The feature can be found on page 8 of the Digital Edition, as well as in the print variant. The article highlights TEP’s 12-month Master’s Degree with Licensure as well as the 10-month Certification program for Licensure only.


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