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Sarah Blizzard

The 28th annual National Association of Graduate Admissions Professionals (NAGAP) Conference was held in New Orleans on April 8 – 11. The conference’s purpose is to bring graduate education management (GEM) professionals together to share and gain insight on a range of topics including, admissions policies and processes, career and staff development, graduate student support and financial aid, legal and ethical issues, marketing and recruitment, and student services. The theme of this year’s conference was, GEM Defined, A New Kind of Rhythm.

Morgridge College of Education Admissions Counselor and Higher Education EdD student, Sarah Blizzard, presented at this year’s conference. Her presentation entitled, Identifying Inclusive Admissions Practices for Transgender & Gender Nonconforming Graduate Students, created dialogue around admissions practices for creating inclusive spaces for Trans* and gender nonconforming graduate students, specifically related to language. Sarah’s presentation is extremely timely as many institutions are having conversations around ways to better serve and be more inclusive of non-binary gender identities. As she discussed in her presentation, applications, forms, statements, and policies are most often what prospective students see when inquiring about grad school; “The language we use and the culture(s) we demonstrate can change whether or not someone applies to our institution.”

Importance of language

A slide from Sarah Blizzard’s NAGAP presentation

Language is important and impacts whether or not students feel welcome/safe in our campus environment. To further engage in this conversation or to learn more email Sarah at Sarah.Blizzard@du.edu.

The University of Denver Morgridge College of Education was well represented at the 2015 American Educational Research Association (AERA) Annual Meeting. This year’s AERA meeting was held April 16-20, in Chicago, IL, with the theme: Toward Justice—Culture, Language, and Heritage in Education Research and Praxis.

With faculty from Child, Family, and School Psychology (CFSP), Higher Education (HED), and Curriculum Studies and Teaching (CST), as well as HED doctoral student Kristin Deal and Project Director at the Kennedy Institute for Educational Success, Doug Van Dine, at the conference, MCE made a great impression on Chicago.  Below is a list of the MCE faculty presentations:

HED Presentations:

  • Weaving Scholarship and Policy Making to Promote Inclusive Excellence in Traditionally White Higher Education Institutions — Dr. Frank Tuitt, Kristin Deal, et al.

 CST Presentations:

  • Black Girls and School Discipline: The Complexities of Being Overrepresented and Understudied Nicole M. Joseph, et al.
  • Blacks’ Mathematics Education before Brown: An Examination of Mathematics Curriculum in Industrial Schools in the Segregated South, 1854 – 1954 — Nicole M. Joseph
  • Which kindergarten Common Core domains are most predictive of later mathematics achievement — Dr. Douglas H. Clements, Dr. Julie Sarama, et al.

CFSP Presentation:

  • Preschool Teachers’ Perceptions of Shared Book Reading Strategies that Promote Content Vocabulary Learning in DLL Children Sharolyn D. Pollard-Durodola, et al.

The U.S. Green Building Council has awarded Katherine A. Ruffatto Hall, Gold LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) Certification.  The U.S. Green Building Council’s LEED certification is the standard for authenticating a building’s green features.  Katherine A. Ruffatto Hall is the 73,568 square-foot home of the Morgridge College of Education (MCE).  This $21.4 million building, constructed in 2010, offers state-of-the-art facilities for students, faculty, and staff.

The goal of all new construction at the University of Denver is to build to the principles of Sliver LEED standards.  However MCE and its stakeholders wanted to achieve an even higher level of certification.  This week, Katherine A. Ruffatto Hall met that important benchmark, Gold LEED certification.  All building space, both inside and out, were integral components in achieving this certification.  Every area was scrutinized for opportunities to make the building greener.  Some Gold Leed Certification features of the building include; utilizing high performance glass in all windows to reduce UV and infrared transmission in the building; having a building design that allows 93% of all regularly occupied spaces within the building to view the outdoors; water efficient landscaping that reduces water consumption by 50%; recycling stations provided throughout the building; carpeting that meets the requirements of the carpet and rug institute’s “green label plus” program throughout the building;  and low-flow and dual-flush plumbing fixtures that reduce water consumption by 30%.  Attaining Gold LEED certification is a real world application of MCE’s mission to be a force for positive change in the lives of individuals, organizations, and communities, by providing innovative and engaging spaces for learning.

On Thursday April 9th the Morgridge College of Education hosted the Denver School of Science and Technology (DSST) Annual Technology Deep Dive. DSST boasts some of the state’s most impressive educational statistics including a 100% acceptance rate to 4-year colleges or universities over the last seven years for all of its graduates.

Attended by educators, MCE Faculty, and community members, the Deep Dive showcased how DSST uses data and technology to build some of Colorado’s most successful schools.  Leaders from DSST presented on many topics including the ways in which DSST faculty and staff use networks, technology, and data environments to empower students, families, teachers, and school leaders.

Join The Alumni Board of The Morgridge College of Education for the Spring Signature Event: A Discussion with Carrie Morgridge, Author of Every Gift Matters and Chancellor Rebecca Chopp, Chancellor of the University of Denver.

Carrie Morgridge is the author of Every Gift Matters and the Vice President of the Morgridge Family Foundation. For the past fifteen years, Carrie and her husband, John, have worked tirelessly to leverage their foundation’s funds, spark innovation, and fuel transformation. She graduated summa cum laude from International Academy of Design and Technology, giving her an edge on design innovation. Carrie is an aggressive athlete, finishing nine ironman competitions. She is recognized nationally for her work as a philanthropist, student advocate, and the creator of innovative professional development for teachers.

The event will feature an interview and Q&A session with Carrie Morgridge and Chancellor Chopp, a reception, and book sales/signing for Every Gift Matters.

Tuesday, May 5, 2015
5:00 p.m. – 8:00 p.m.
Katherine A. Ruffatto Hall

Interested in becoming a librarian, archivist, or information professional? The Morgridge College of Education’s Library and Information Science Program can get you there. In a climate where information and cultural heritage professions are constantly changing, our faculty are focused on keeping pace with the latest technology and trends. Not only do faculty bring a wide array of experience, skills, and innovation, they connect students to the vibrant and engaged community of practitioners in the area.

Information is everywhere. Having a degree in Library and Information Science will open the doors to an almost infinite variety of professions. Technically-minded individuals have opportunities to work in the fields of web design, data curation, digital libraries, or digital archives. Those interested in connecting directly with people can find a place in community outreach, information literacy, youth librarianship, or reference. The career opportunities are limitless.

What Graduates are Doing?

Library & Information Science at a Glance James RogersSenior Special Collection Librarian – James W. Rogers has many responsibilities at the Denver Public Library including managing the daily operations of the Western History/Genealogy Department, photo sales, reference desk, and WHG’s digital strategy.

Library & Information Science at a Glance Chris CoughlanInformation Architect – Chris Coughlan works as an information architect for the digital strategy, design, and development agency Aten Design Group. Aten creates user-centered digital experiences for cause-driven organizations, such as Colorado Public Radio, UC Berkley, Human Rights Watch, and the World Wildlife Fund.

Library & Information Science at a Glance Maria HuggerProduct Manager, Collection Development – Maria Hugger works for EBSCO Information Services as Product Manager of Collection Development tools, such as the H.W. Wilson Core Collections.

Library & Information Science at a Glance Natlia TingleAssistant Professor – Natalia Tingle is an Assistant Professor at the William M. White Business Library at the University of Colorado Boulder where she serves as a subject specialist for instruction and reference in the business disciplines.

Learn More About the LIS Program

MCE Child, Family, & School Psychology alum, Dr. Melissa Reeves, was recently elected to serve as President of the National Association of School Psychologists (NASP) for 2016-17. Dr. Reeves, an adjunct instructor for Winthrop University and a pre K-12 school psychologist, is a two time recipient of the NASP Presidential award (2006 & 2011). She has received numerous other accolades including the NASP Crisis Interest Group Award for Excellence (2007 & 2011), the Cheery Creek School District Golden Heart Award (2006) and the University of Denver, College of Education Leadership in Learning Alumni Award (2006).

Dr. Reeves has conducted more than 200 workshops and presentations and works with schools on establishing a positive and safe school climate that focuses on prevention programs and positive discipline measures to decrease behavioral incidences while increasing academic achievement. As the co-creator of the NASP PPREPaRE School Crisis Prevention and Intervention curriculum, she developed the first nationally disseminated school crisis prevention and intervention curriculum. She is also an accomplished author, having co-authored three books: School Crisis Prevention and Intervention: The PREPaRE Model; Identifying, Assessing, and Treating PTSD at School; and Comprehensive Planning for Safe Learning Environments: A School Professional’s Guide to Integrating Physical and Psychological Safety: Prevention through Recovery, in addition to co-authoring numerous journal articles and book chapters.

We are proud of NASP President, Dr. Melissa Reeves, and all of her accomplishments.

 

Morgridge’s Dr. Douglas H. Clements, Professor in Curriculum Studies and Teaching and Kennedy Endowed Chair in Early Childhood Learning at the Kennedy Institute, co-authored the report, Transforming the Workforce for Children Birth to Age Eight: A Unifying Foundation. The report, released through The Institute of Medicine (IOM) and The National Research Council (NRC), explores the science of child development, focusing specifically on the implications for professionals that work with children birth through age eight. Dr. Clements and his colleagues offer recommendations with a goal of developing a workforce unified through the foundations of the science of child development and early learning. Their research and recommendations promote shared knowledge and skills that are needed to provide consistent, high-quality support for the development and early learning of children from birth through age eight.

Check out the Report

The Educational Leadership and Policy Studies (ELPS) program at the University of Denver’s Morgridge College of Education in partnership with the Daniels College of Business (DCB) has been named by the Colorado Department of Education (CDE) as an identified provider for the School Turnaround Leadership Grant Program. The University of Denver Turnaround School Leadership Program is a tiered system of leadership development that includes the ELPS MA program for aspiring turnaround leaders (Turnaround Fellows) and a professional development program (Turnaround Leader Success Program) for existing principals, principal supervisors, district staff, and other stakeholders. Districts, charter schools, and the Charter School Institute can apply to CDE for funding to have eligible teachers, principals, and district staff participate in this comprehensive program that will prepare and support leaders to improve the performance of students in the lowest-performing schools and districts in Colorado.

ELPS, a frequent recipient of national awards and grants for its efforts in innovative and effective school leadership preparation, already provides a foundation for turnaround leadership competencies through the certificate programs: Executive Leadership for Successful Schools (ELSS) and the Ritchie Program for School Leaders (Ritchie). The collaboration with DCB will build on this foundation and deepen competency development for the turnaround environment through the additional coursework of the ELPS MA with a focus on entrepreneurial, re-culturing, business, and innovation leadership. The Turnaround Leader Success Program will provide an additional layer of support for building leadership capacity throughout schools/districts.  The ELPS-MA program is a 2-year, 7-quarter program; students are eligible to apply for CO Principal licensure at the end of their first year. The Turnaround Leader Success Program will be customized to meet the unique needs of participating districts/schools and the work of the Turnaround Fellows.

By increasing partnerships with school districts, charter schools, and the Charter School Institute, the program will focus student learning on the unique needs of low performing schools. Specifically, those of special education, low-income students and their families, and English language learners; developing leaders ready to make a difference in the community.

CPD Logo1We’re excited to announce that Morgridge is hosting The It Gets Better Journey. This is an opportunity to learn about helping young people who are confronted with bullying and other challenges in their adolescence. During the participation session you will be taken through the influential history of the It Gets Better Project; learn about the development of the live show, listen to artists share their personal narratives, and offer reflections on the project’s mission.

The It Gets Better Journey Comes to the Morgridge College of Education_3

The It Gets Better Journey

A multimedia journey through It Gets Better‘s history. Join the conversation about helping young people face challenges.
Tuesday, April 21, 2015

5:30 p.m. – 6:30 p.m.
Katherine A. Ruffatto Hall Commons

RSVP Here for the Event

The It Gets Better Journey Comes to the Morgridge College of Education_2

Often new teachers enter their career excited and full of energy, but rapidly begin to feel like something is missing. Too quickly they feel like leaving. Is this you? Someone you know?

Paul michalec

Dr. Paul michalec

Early Career Teachers: Sustaining the Fire is an opportunity to join a community of other early career teachers to share stories, develop skills and provide support during this critical time of professional identity formation. The early years of teaching often follow a yearly pattern that starts with excitement in the fall and bottoms out in December with disillusionment followed by anticipation in the late spring. Most schools and school districts lack the capacity for helping teachers work through the learning associated with disillusionment and loss of heart. Consequently, many teachers exit the field of education before they have three years of experience. Under the guidance of Dr. Paul Michalec, you will learn both the latest research in the experiences of early career teachers, strategies and techniques for responding to the challenges, and participate in a community of fellow practitioners sharing stories of early career experiences.

The session will be held Wednesday April 8th, 2015 from 5:00 – 7:00 PM. It will be held in Ruffatto Hall, room 202, 1999 E. Evans Avenue, Denver CO 80208 and will cost $25.

We hope you will join us and continue your professional learning, transforming passion into purpose.

Find Out More Here

Educators gathered at MCE on Monday, March 23rd, to listen to Dr. Fredrick M. Hess discuss his soon to be released book The Cage-Busting Teacher. Dr. Hess, a graduate of Harvard University and director of Education Policy Studies at The American Enterprise Institute, is an iconic author on education policy and administration.

“Teachers tend to get stuck at policy, bureaucracy, and leadership” said Dr. Hess, who then went on to present a number of ways for teachers to proactively improve their schools and systems through interaction with administration and policy. The evening concluded with a lively discussion that focused primarily on Colorado’s education policy as participants discussed their own experiences, both positive and negative.

Dr. Shimelis Assefa exemplifies Inclusive Excellence through his scholarly work in global knowledge production. His research focus on knowledge production and knowledge diffusion highlights a new form of social-class division, which is commonly known as the north-south divide, which he frames as the knowledge divide. For Dr. Assefa, knowledge divide between a developed and a developing country is based on human capital. As the key element to the wealth of nations and globalization, human capital facilitates the free flow of ideas, information, best-practices, know-how, and knowledge on a global scale. He investigates how Africa’s limited access and non-recognized contribution to the global knowledge base creates a challenge for Africa, hindering it from playing an active role in today’s knowledge-based economy. In his book chapter Unfulfilled Promises of Globalization: Global Knowledge Production and Africa, he argues that global knowledge production is critical for a speedier, wider, and deeper interconnectedness that is inclusive and benefits all nations involved. Dr. Assefa is an Associate Professor in the Library and Information Science program.

Dr. Shimelis Assefa talks with students

In 2012, Dr. Assefa organized a panel discussion at the Association for Information Science and Technology annual meeting on the topic of Content Divide: Africa and the Global Knowledge Footprint. Taking research outputs and patent applications across all regions of the world, he analyzed the volume of production as a barometer for the well-being of nations’ scientific and innovation impact. Last year, at the same conference in Seattle, WA, he organized and led another panel on the topic of Open Access: The Global Scene, with the goal of reviewing global open access practices and suggesting ideas for the implementation of an international infrastructure that supports and sustains the future of open scholarly communication. In his recent interview with Janet Lee, Dean of Libraries at Regis University, he discussed challenges and opportunities of library collaboration from an international perspective. One key theme he discussed in the interview is exemplified through the practices of PubMed Central (PMC), the world’s largest free full-text database of bio-medical and life sciences  that archives more than 3.3 million journal articles and scientific papers. Hosted by the National Library of Medicine and the National Institute of Health, so far PMC International (PMCI) supports only Europe (Europe PMC) and Canada (PMC Canada).

In his recent publication Diffusion of scientific knowledge in agriculture: The case for Africa, he developed a knowledge diffusion model that enhances the existing extension service that is slow and hierarchical. Borrowing from the method of translational research, Dr. Shimelis investigates methods on how scientific research findings reach farmers, in a format and language that is easy to use and provides timely access, thereby narrowing the gap from knowledge to action/decision-making. Dr. Assefa also organized and led a workshop for agricultural scientists at the International Association of Agricultural Information Specialists titled Using Moodle as an Online Learning Management System to offer Professional Development Courses to Agricultural Extension Workers in Africa. He has played leadership roles in the Association for Information Science and Technology, where he served as co-chair (2011-2012) and chair (2014-2015) of the Special Interest Group in International Information Issues. We look forward to his continued dedication to Inclusive Excellence.

Dr. Shimelis Assefa - Portfolio

The Morgridge College of Education (MCE) has received a substantial donation in support of its Library and Information Science Program from Ruth D. Klein. The donation will go to scholarships for this year’s incoming Master’s students. Ms. Klein is a graduate of DU’s LIS Program and served as a librarian in the Denver Public Schools for over 30 years.

Ruth Klein was honored by the Morgridge College of Education and DU’s Office of Advancement at a luncheon on March 4th, where Dean Karen Riley (MCE) and Dean Nancy Allen (Anderson Academic Commons) joined LIS students and faculty members to thank Ms. Klein for her contributions to the field of library information science.

Find Out More About the Library & Information Science Program

Dr. Ryan Evely Gildersleeve exemplifies Inclusive Excellence through his scholarly work, investigating the social and political contexts of educational opportunity for historically marginalized communities. Specifically, his research focuses on college access and success, higher education policy and critical qualitative inquiry. Dr. Gildersleeve is an Associate Professor and the Program Coordinator in the Higher Education (HED) Program.  He is an alumnus of Occidental College, and after, received his M.A. in Higher Education and Organizational Change and Ph.D. in Education from UCLA.

Currently, Dr. Gildersleeve is embarking on research that explores Latino graduation ceremonies. On a previous project, Los Estudiantes Migrantes y Educación (LEME), Gildersleeve worked with 12 migrant youth and their families, in California, over an eight year period. During this time all but two of the youth graduated from college and invited him back to attend their graduations. Of those 10 students, nine participated in Latino graduation ceremonies, preferring Gildersleeve to attend the Latino specific ceremony over the institutional commencement ceremony. His notion of the graduation ceremony was reimagined. Gildersleeve explained, “I noticed they were somewhat different than the institutional commencement ceremonies that I had become accustomed to; there was something really interesting in how the Latino ceremonies focused on students and families.” This is where his focus on Latino graduation ceremonies began, “One of these students from LEME was on a graduation committee, and he invited me to be the keynote speaker. That was really the beginning of the project for me.”

“I noticed they were somewhat different than the institutional commencement ceremonies that I had become accustomed to; there was something really interesting in how the Latino ceremonies focused on students and families.”

For Dr. Gildersleeve, part of why it’s important to examine Latino graduation ceremonies is that “ceremonies produce and reflect changing power structures in the purposes and values of higher education. Particularly, as we see the demographics of the United States changing rapidly, and an ascendancy of a stronger Latino middle class.” Morgridge HED students Darsella Vigil and Ben Clark are aiding Gildersleeve throughout the project. As Gildersleeve’s research gets underway, he will be visiting with student organizers of Latino graduation ceremonies and attending a number of these ceremonies throughout the spring of 2015. We look forward to the findings of his research and his continued dedication to inclusive excellence!

Dr. Ryan Evely Gildersleeve - Portfolio

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