Morgridge Contributor Blog Archive

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Morgridge Contributor Blog Archive

Morgridge College of Education’s Teacher Education Program (TEP), was recently featured in the September 24, 2014, edition of  La Voz, “Colorado’s #1 Hispanic-Owned Bilingual Publication.” The feature can be found on page 8 of the Digital Edition, as well as in the print variant. The article highlights TEP’s 12-month Master’s Degree with Licensure as well as the 10-month Certification program for Licensure only.

Good day gold star 2We’d like to send a special congratulations to recent Teacher Education Program (TEP) graduate, Nina Jarnot. Nina has bas been awarded the Fox31 Good Day Gold Star Award, by Fox31 Denver. This monthly award goes to teachers who go above and beyond their call of duty.

With one week to go before the start of the 2014/2015 school year, Coyote Creek Elementary School in Highlands Ranch, CO, was in need of a second grade teacher. Nina quickly arrived to the rescue. She interviewed in the morning and by afternoon received a callback from administrators offering her the job, “It was a quick turnaround, but I was really thankful and excited,” Nina explains. The Good day gold star 3administrators aren’t alone in their approval of the new second grade teacher expresses one parent, “With her youth and enthusiasm, I think it really shines through, and I just think she’s a great asset to the school.”

The Morgridge College of Education and Teacher Education Program are proud of our very own, Nina Jarnot!

To see the Fox 31 segment highlighting Nina, follow this link:  http://www.covideo.com/p.php?s=51302bcd8b

Are you interested in a graduate program in the University of Denver Morgridge College of Education? Webinars are a great way to learn about Morgridge and our programs.

View the webinars recorded on various dates in our Student Resources

 

NOTE: You must download the Adobe Flash program prior to viewing this webinar. Please do so by visiting: http://get.adobe.com/flashplayer/

 

Morgridge’s very own Educational Leadership and Policy Studies (ELPS) Principal Preparation Program has been awarded the 2014 UCEA Exemplary Educational Leadership Preparation Program Award.  This award as presented by the University Council for Educational Administration (UCEA) recognizes ELPS for having well involved district partnerships, demanding recruitment and selection processes, faculty capacity, and program effectiveness, among many other factors.

ELPS shares this prestigious award with North Carolina State University’s Northeast Leadership Academy. The award along with a $7,000 cash prize will be presented to the ELPS Principal Preparation Program at the UCEA Awards Luncheon, Thursday, November 20th, 2014, at the 28th annual UCEA Convention in Washington, DC.

Let’s congratulate ELPS for this outstanding honor!

Special Event: 
October 6 2014, Transformative Leadership:  A Call to Action with Dr. Carolyn Shields

Please join us for a social hour with appetizers and non-alcoholic beverages, followed by a conversation on transformative leadership from one of the leading global scholars on socially just educational leadership and policy.

Cost: Free! Please RSVP here no later than October 4, 2014

The NY Times has recently published an article discussing professional struggles getting into the fields of Law, Business, Medicine, Dentistry, Education, Engineering. The highlight on the education profession features the TPP (Teacher Preparation Program) we participate in at MCE such as DTR and TPP.

Article Education Snippet from : Going Professional: The Ins and Outs: Law, Business, Medicine, Dentistry, Education, Engineering (2014 Aug 1)

EDUCATION | New Standards Coming

Getting in: Fair or not, education schools have a bad reputation. Their admission standards are too low, critics say, their curriculum out of touch. But there is promise of a new era. Recently, the Council for the Accreditation of Educator Preparation introduced new standards that will require entering cohorts to have at least a 3.0 grade-point average and test scores in the top 50 percent nationally by 2016-17. Once students graduate, they are likely to see tougher preparation and licensing requirements as well.

And out: Many education schools have been trying to do more to help students hone the skills they will need on the job. “There’s this idea that teacher prep has not been preparing students for the classroom,” says Ann Nutter Coffman, a senior policy analyst at the National Education Association. “So rather than focusing on theory, there’s a movement to have more clinically based preparation.”

That means future teachers are spending more time in front of students. Innovative teacher-residence programs, such as those offered by the University of Denver and University of Washington, allow participants to teach alongside a mentor in urban public schools while earning a master’s in education — a degree that puts teachers on a higher salary scale and opens up administrative job opportunities down the line.

As for shortages, the nation’s schools have many, especially in math, physics and chemistry. Special-education instructors and middle-school teachers are in high demand. But K-6 teachers are more plentiful, and there’s a surplus of biology teachers. Getting certified in more than one subject can help applicants secure a position, which is why Ms. Coffman says prospective teachers should not put all their eggs in one basket. “Maybe you want to be an elementary schoolteacher,” she says, “but adding special education to that makes it more likely you’ll find a job.”

To view the full article, CLICK HERE.

From: Gregg Kvistad, Provost and Executive Vice Chancellor

It is with great pleasure that I share the news that Dr. Karen Riley has been named dean of the Morgridge College of Education. Chancellor Emeritus Robert Coombe and I launched the search for the permanent dean of the College in late spring. A search committee was formed and very ably led by Dr. Shelly Smith-Acuna, dean of the Graduate School of Professional Psychology. After meeting with the committee last week, the position was offered to Karen, and she enthusiastically accepted.

As many of you know, Karen served as interim dean of the College for the last year. She is an associate professor with tenure, in the area of Child, Family, and School Psychology. From 2011 until 2013, she was the department chair of the Educational Research Policy and Practice program. Between 2010 and 2012, Karen put her leadership skills to work as faculty director of the Fisher Early Learning Center at the University. Karen joined the University as an assistant professor in 2004. She received her master’s degree from DU in 1986 in early childhood special education, and her Ph.D. in 1998 in child and family studies.

Between 1986 and 1997, Karen served as an education practitioner, working as an early childhood specialist and special education preschool coordinator for Adams County School District #12. After completing her Ph.D., Karen shifted gears and embarked on a very productive research career that has won her international acclaim. Working on Fragile X Syndrome, Karen has been funded by the National Institute of Health, the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, the U.S. Department of Education, Novartis Pharmaceutical, the Colorado Department of Education, and other agencies and foundations.

In short, Karen Riley has excellent credentials and an impressive track-record of teaching and research distinction as well as academic leadership. Her candidacy received extraordinarily strong support from her colleagues at the College, other faculty members across the institution, and the many University administrators with whom a dean interacts at the University.

Please join me in warmly welcoming Dr. Karen Riley to the position of dean of the Morgridge College of Education.

Our Ryan Evely Gildersleeve , an associate professor of higher education at Morgridge College of Education at the University of Denver was recently interviewed by Matthew Lynch from Diverse Education. Ryan discusses the current and possible future trends of higher education and why they are so important to higher education professionals.

To view Article, view here: http://diverseeducation.com/article/66148/

Share Fair Nation (SFN) is a Morgridge Family Foundation (MFF) sponsored event that provides PreK-12 educators the opportunity to join the conversation around inspired teaching and learning, to collaborate and share best practices, to discover emergent strategies and technologies, and to see firsthand valuable and innovative approaches to delivering 21st Century learning.

The Share Fair Nation is made up of educators, administrators, parents, community leaders and others with an interest in transforming education beyond the 21st Century and it is coming to the Morgridge College of Education September 27, 2014.

If I had it to do all over again, I wouldn’t change a thing.

Like many twenty-somethings fresh out of undergrad, I landed in a position that felt more like a career than not, but certainly didn’t fulfill an all-encompassing life purpose. I was simply happy to be working in a position I enjoyed, not thinking too much about the next steps in my career path. I was fortunate to develop experience as a sales manager with a large and reputable company, which would later prove to be invaluable in my career change. But, as I eventually realized that particular job was not going to lead to a place of lasting interest to me, I had to decide how I was going to use the skills I had gained to work my way toward something more fulfilling.

A part time position at a public library lead me to discover something about myself. Whether it would be in libraries or another type of organization, I knew that I needed to pursue something that felt purposeful to me.

I decided it was important to obtain a Library Information Science degree, which would provide me with a basis of knowledge for a library position. I didn’t have a great deal of experience working in libraries, and felt that this would help prepare me for the type of work I was excited to begin doing.

I applied to a handful of LIS programs, and at the top of my list was the University of Denver and Morgridge College of Education’s LIS program. I wanted to be in Colorado if possible, and I wanted a program that would offer an in-person academic experience. Networking and learning from professionals face to face was one of my priorities, and DU delivered.

I was able to learn from many different professionals working in the field locally. The in-person program provided me with a variety of hands-on, practical experiences that boosted my knowledge and local support system. I graduated with my MLIS and a job in public libraries at the end of 2 years. And, during that time, I discovered a particular interest within libraries and non-profits I wouldn’t have known existed without going through the LIS program within Morgridge.

With the many opportunities the program led to, I discovered evaluation, analysis, and assessment in libraries and non-profits. The work is an excellent match to my passion that was there before I even knew what to do with it. While completing the LIS program, I became familiar with the Research Methods and Statistics program in MCE, and it proved to be the perfect avenue to continue my studies and deepen my focus in my chosen field. I’m completing my first year in the RMS doctorate program now, while continuing to work in public libraries, which will inform my work in research to come.

The faculty in MCE have been continuously supportive and steadfast in assisting me in reaching my goals. I’m continually challenged to think about my path, the steps I’m taking to get there, and how this is fulfilling my goal and professional purpose. My time working on my graduate studies at MCE has certainly shaped me as a professional, as an individual, as well as a seeker of education. Community and education is the thread of passion that links all MCE graduate students together. I’ve discovered that, as varied as our careers and interests are, our common goal is to do meaningful work in our fields.

 

Message from the Interim Deankaren riley

Hello, I am Karen Riley, Interim Dean for the Morgridge College of Education at the University of Denver. Education serves as the foundation and the means for positive change within our society. At Morgridge College, we have strong programs within our three departments (Educational Research, Policy, and Practice; Research Methods and Information Science; and School and Counseling Psychology) that provide our students with a solid foundation to become agents of change.

Choosing a graduate school is one of the most important decisions you will make in your career. This is an exciting time, yet it can be overwhelming as you have many options and are faced with a great deal of information. The University of Denver has a long-standing reputation for excellence, innovation and community involvement. Founded in 1864, our university is recognized as the premier private university in the Rocky Mountain region. Our graduates reside across the country and the world, holding prominent positions within their communities and serving as agents for positive change. We seek students who will perpetuate this positive pattern and continue our mission for equity and inclusive excellence.

The Morgridge College of Education has a commitment to excellence in education. Regardless of your choice of program and ultimate profession, your experience here will include high-quality and rigorous academics provided by a nationally recognized faculty, utilizing engaged pedagogical practices. Our commitment to the student experience ensures that we have smaller class sizes so students have opportunities to work closely with faculty on research and community-oriented projects.

We have a diverse student body that serves to enhance the academic experience. Working with your peers and professors will facilitate your professional development as well as your personal growth. We provide programs tailored to full-time traditional students as well at those that are convenient for working adults. Some of our courses are provided via a blended online approach. Regardless of the program or the delivery method, our mission is to help prepare you through well-designed coursework and relevant practical experiences.

A graduate degree or certificate from the Morgridge College of Education serves as a nationally recognized credential. Our programs are approved through the Colorado Department of Education and accredited by relevant national organizations.

As a DU/MCE alumna, I take great pride in our programs and our commitment to excellence and innovation. Please take the time to review the information on our website and reach out to our admissions team with any additional questions. We also encourage you to attend one of our information sessions so that we can meet you in person and give you a tour of our state=of-the-art building, Katherine A. Ruffatto Hall. This building is loaded with the latest in educational technology to advance your learning experience as well as to prepare you to use these tools effectively as you serve others in your future profession. We hope to see you in the fall!

karen-riley-signature

See more about Dr. Riley and Here

This videos highlights the entire financial aid process for the University of Denver

If you missed the Deposited student webinars for Fall start programs and for TEP please feel free to review them at the links provided below.

 

Deposited student webinar for all Fall-start programs: https://connect.du.edu/p1t80gl4n8e/

Deposited student webinar for TEP: https://connect.du.edu/p19deeyo5g0/

Since joining the Morgridge College of Education faculty in 2011, Dr. Nicole M. Joseph, Assistant Professor of Curriculum and Instruction, advances research and practice around issues related to access, equity and achievement for underrepresented minorities. Her work focuses particularly on social justice for African American females in math education. In addition to her research, Dr. Joseph is strongly committed to teaching, employing transformative practice to co-construct deep learning experiences for her students. Congratulations are in order; Dr. Joseph was recently awarded the 2014-2015 National Academy of Education/Spencer Postdoctoral Fellowship.


Dr. Joseph is currently working on a number of research projects. She is co-editing a book with MCE alumna Dr. Chayla Haynes and Dr. Floyd Cobb entitled, Interrogating Whiteness and Relinquishing Power: White Faculty’s Commitment to Racial Consciousness in STEM Classrooms, which seeks to link issues of inclusion to teacher excellence by illuminating the critical influence that racial consciousness has on the behaviors of White faculty in the classroom (Haynes, 2013). The important work specifically examines STEM classrooms because of the over saturation of White faculty teaching in STEM, in addition to the STEM system being a White institutional space that perpetuates hegemony, thereby negatively influencing racially minoritized students’ equitable outcomes. The book is scheduled for release in the spring of 2015.

In addition to finishing her book, Dr. Joseph continues her work on the math and science education of Blacks during segregation from 1854 to 1954 through a University of Denver funded PROF grant. This study focuses on archival data collected from 28 Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) across 11 states from sources such as math and science textbooks, math and science faculty papers, institution catalogs, yearbooks, and school newspapers. This history project has advanced Dr. Joseph to be a semi-finalist for the 2014 National Academy of Education/Spencer Postdoctoral Fellowship.  Additionally, Dr. Joseph recently submitted an article to the Journal of Negro Education based on this work and is also working on turning this research into a book manuscript.

Beginning Fall 2014, Dr. Joseph will work with a University of Denver Interdisciplinary Research Incubator for the Study of (In) Equality (IRISE) post-doctoral fellow to study race, class and gender inequalities in K-12 schools. Over the next two years, she and the post-doc will be working with the historical study data as well as designing a graduate course that will be cross-listed in education, social work, and law.

While working on these projects, Dr. Joseph also continues her work with The Sistah Network, a group she founded in 2012 that includes more than 50 Black women who are current doctoral students and faculty members across the university. The Sistah Network brings these women together to provide them with academic opportunities for professional development and support their psychological, social and emotional success.

A morning advocating for additional support for children with autism, to an evening dinner networking with some of the great thinkers in the field of School Psychology. This was a day in the life of Brittany Sovran and Jessica S. Reinhardt at the National Association of School Psychologists (NASP) Annual Convention.  The highlight, however, was the two students’ attendance at the Woodcock-Muñoz Foundation’s Dinner. For the first time in the history of the Woodcock-Muñoz Foundation’s Dinner event at the NASP Annual Convention, students were nominated by faculty to attend.

The Woodcock-Muñoz Foundation (WMF) is a private, nonprofit, operating foundation that supports the advancement of contemporary cognitive assessment. The WMF engages in programs of instructional support to professional preparation programs, research concerning the abilities of individuals with diagnosed exceptionalities, and closely-related educational and research projects and applications.

Child, Family and School Psychology faculty members, Dr. Karen Dittrick-Nathan and Dr. Cynthia Hazel, who were invited to the dinner event, nominated Brittany Sovran and Jessica Reinhardt for the honor of attendance. The two University of Denver students were then selected by the event’s planning committee to attend.

Both Jessica and Brittany took the conference as an opportunity to network and advocate for their agenda.  Earlier in the conference they visited Colorado Senator Mark Udall (D) to advocate for additional funding for mental health in school. Jessica shared that the event, “was a great opportunity to meet a variety of professionals in the field, including faculty from other universities, and those highly regarded in the area of test development.” Both students stressed that the opportunity to form relationships with potential mentors from other institutions, could prove beneficial for learning additional techniques for educating and training school psychologists.

Jessica emphasized that it is life changing to meet the frontrunners in test development at various moments of the conference. “This event [WMF dinner], specifically at this conference inspired me to pursue a career in academia.” Jessica describes herself as both an academic and practitioner, and although she wants to continue working at the grassroots level, her appreciation for having a more systemic impact by training school psychologists is even greater. She shares that “in the future, I can now see myself in a faculty position at a university, where having a greater impact is possible.”

The Faculty in the Child, Family and School Psychology Program encouraged all Morgridge College of Education students attending the conference to speak with legislators who can influence change on a variety of issues affecting child, family, and school psychologists in Colorado. The CFSP program provides students the foundation to not only be Change Agents and advocates in the field but also highly competent, collaborative, ethical and self-reflective scientist-practitioners.  To learn more about the program and the Morgridge College of Education, visit www.du.edu/education.


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